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Kentucky Recruit Andrew Harrison Thinks He'd Beat Michael Jordan In One-on-One ... In His Prime?

Andrew Harrison and brother, Aaron, will be a part of Kentucky's incoming recruiting class. (Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)Andrew Harrison and brother, Aaron, will be a part of Kentucky's incoming recruiting class. (Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)

Every now and again, you come across a story that doesn't need a long-winded introduction or flowery scene setting. Today, we have one of those, where the immediately visceral reaction of "LOL, c'mon son" is more than enough starting context.

According to USA Today, Andrew Harrison, a top-10 prospect who, along with twin brother, Aaron, will be part of Kentucky's loaded freshman class in the fall, thinks he can beat Michael Jordan one-on-one. And, apparently, he's not talking about today's 50-year-old Jordan, the one who worked over Michael Kidd-Gilchrist mano a mano a couple months ago. You know, the Kidd-Gilchrist who was the No. 2 overall pick in the draft last year after helping take Kentucky to the national title.

No, Harrison thinks (apparently) that he could have handled MJ in his prime.

“I think he’d get a couple buckets here and there, but then I’d start to lock him down and give him buckets. Yeah, I think I’d get him.”

Now let's step back for a second. The other kids in that article who picked themselves to beat Jordan appeared to have been kidding, at least in part. The descriptions on how they would handle the showdown range from slightly lighthearted to obviously joking. Harrison's quote has none of that nuance to it, but it's entirely possible it's false bravado, depending on the context of the interview, who else was clowning around, etc.

So let's give him the benefit of that doubt, because if he's serious ... well, he's not being serious. Because MJ would "get a couple buckets here and there." And then a couple more. And then, well, basically anything else he wanted, depending on what was being wagered on the outcome. 

Extreme confidence in an elite athlete is a plus, but the line crossing over to irrationality is a very thin one. Maybe if this gets back to Jordan himself, we'll see that distinction in vivid color.

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