Pete Rose said on The Dan Patrick Show on Tuesday that he bet around $2,000 per game on the Reds while he was managing them.

"It was like $2,000. That's it," Rose said in the interview. "And it didn't change -- because I know you're going to say, Well betting's all about pitching and stuff like that -- I didn't care who was pitching for me or who was pitching for the opposition. I just made it easy for the guys making the bets and just bet this much every game and that's the way we did it."

In his 2004 book, My Prison Without Bars, Rose had admitted to betting $1,000 per game as manager of the Reds, starting in 1987, and said he bet $2,000 on football games. The $2,000 figure for baseball bets was mentioned in 1989's Dowd Report, the findings of baseball's investigation into Rose's gambling, but Rose had never previously confirmed that amount.

Rose was banned from baseball for life by then-commissioner Bart Giamatti in September 1989 but denied those allegations until early 2004, when he came clean and admitted to betting on the Reds while he was their manager.

The banishment has kept baseball's all-time hits leader out of the Hall of Fame. Rose, who retired after the 1986 season, compiled 4,256 hits, made 17 All-Star teams at five different positions, won the 1963 NL Rookie of the Year award, the 1973 NL MVP award and helped three teams to World Series titles. He managed the Reds from 1984 until his banishment in 1989.

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