Wednesday June 24th, 2015

Harvey Pollack, the longtime 76ers director of statistical information and the lone remaining employee from the NBA's inaugural 1946–47 season to still be working in the league, died Tuesday at age 93. 

Among Pollack's credited contributions to the sport is the initiation of tracking the league's offensive and defensive rebounds, steals, turnovers, blocked shots and minutes played. He also came up with the concept of the triple-double.

"He may never have laced up his sneakers, but few have done more to advance the game, in the NBA or Philadelphia basketball, than Harvey," said Philadelphia 76ers Chief Executive Officer Scott O’Neil.

Pollack is perhaps best remembered for keeping score at the Philadelphia Warriors game in 1962 in which Wilt Chamberlain set the NBA single-game scoring record of 100 points. Pollack wrote '100' on a piece of paper and handed it to Chamberlain, who held it up to the cameras and posed for an iconic photo. 

Pollack was awarded the Naismith Hall of Fame's lifetime achievement award, the highest honor bestowed to an individual who has not been enshrined. 

Commissioner Adam Silver released a statement Tuesday noting that "there has never been an NBA without Harvey Pollack."

"He documented NBA history for nearly 70 years with passion, curiosity and a relentless work ethic," Silver said.

"Harvey has been a true caretaker and ambassador of the game, and he will be sorely missed. The entire NBA family sends its deepest condolences to the Pollack family as well as the Philadelphia 76ers organization."

- Will Green

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