Thursday August 20th, 2015

While training at USA Basketball's August minicamp, Carmelo Anthony, John Wall and a host of other stars shared their opinions on the NBA's fast-moving media landscape.

With Twitter and Instagram becoming the sources for stories, particularly in the off-season and oftentimes as much as players and league personnel themselves, the rate at which news disseminates and small things can become big stories has increased rapidly. Couple that with intense interest in a historically busy off-season in terms of free agent contracts, and things get hectic.

CBS Sports' Ken Berger compiled answers from many of the team's stars on a variety of topics, including what they think the most frustrating aspect of media (and social media) is.

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It's been a relatively trying off-season for Carmelo Anthony, who's dealt with reports about his unhappiness with the Knicks (and their drafting of Kristaps Porzingis) and has responded to fans' criticism on Instagram multiple times.

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“Especially in the off-season, it's just a matter of everybody trying to get a story; everybody trying to get a byte,” Anthony told CBS Sports. “It frustrates me because I have to sit back and I have to read all this and look at all this and I don't say anything, I stay to myself in the off-season. And I always look and it's always a different topic. It's always a different story. One day it's me and Phil [Jackson], one day it's me and Fish [Derek Fisher], one day it's me and [Kristaps] Porzingis. It's always something.

“Untrue stories,” Clippers forward Blake Griffin responded. “I think the worst thing that's happened to sports is ‘sources say.' Sometimes it takes the credibility out of it. But it's a part of it now, and I think guys are learning how to deal with it and learning how to stay out of harm's way.”

One such story this off-season was DeAndre Jordan's free agent signing-day saga, with rumors flying surrounding what was happening inside the Clippers center's house as he decided to remain in Los Angeles rather than join the Mavericks.

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“Our lives are out in the open. We don't have a choice,“ Jordan said. “Guys get drafted when they're 17-18 years old, and their lives are a show. Nobody asked for that. But at the same time, in my situation, we've all made decisions in our life where we go, ‘Did I make that decision too quick?' I'm pretty sure everybody here has gone back on a decision, but in our case, it gets blown out of proportion and it makes us look like bad people. The reality is, we're human.”

Wizards point guard John Wall said he appreciated interest from media and fans, although it can get tiring at times. “But you also have to think,” Wall said, “for this kid, it might be the first time and the last time that they see you in person, so you try to make sacrifices. If you sign 300 pictures and then forget the last five people, they're still going to talk trash about you. So you've got to suck it up and deal with it because you know what you did and what you sacrificed.”

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- Jeremy Woo

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