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Rob Bironas toxicology report released
NFL
Rob Bironas toxicology report released
Friday October 3rd, 2014

Toxicology testing on former Tennessee Titans kicker Rob Bironas showed that he had a blood alcohol level of .218 percent, reports Jim Wyatt of The Tennessean.

The legal limit is .08. 

Wyatt reports that a low level of Diazepam (Valium) was also detected, but the medical examiner said this level would have had a negligible effect on Bironas.

Bironas, who was 36, was killed in a single-vehicle crash on Sept. 20. Police said his vehicle veered off the road, hitting multiple trees before ultimately coming to a halt upside down in a drainage culvert. He was transported to a hospital, where he was pronounced dead on arrival. 

Since the crash, two different witnesses have reported that they saw Bironas driving erratically before the accident. One couple alleged that he tried to run them off them off the road, and a college student told a newspaper that Bironas pulled up next to their truck and said he was going to kill them. 

Robert Klemko wrote a feature about Bironas for The MMQB earlier this week in which former Titans teammate Matt Hasselbeck says that alcohol was part of his regular weekend routine earlier in his career, but that he had heard Bironas had cleaned up that part of his life.

"If it ends up being alcohol, that's OK, because it's a part of his story," Hasselbeck told Klemko in an unpublished part of their conversation. "It can be a lesson."

Bironas was released by the Titans in March after playing nine seasons for the team. Bironas went undrafted out of Auburn in 2001 and made his NFL debut in 2005 with the Titans.

The Titans announced earlier Friday that they will honor Bironas before Sunday's game. 

- Molly Geary

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