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President Obama on Lions non-call: 'I'd be aggravated'
0:50 | NFL
President Obama on Lions non-call: 'I'd be aggravated'
Wednesday January 7th, 2015

President Barack Obama said he would be "pretty aggravated" if he were a Detroit Lions fan after the NFL acknowledged that two plays during the wild-card game against the Dallas Cowboys could have been called.

During the fourth quarter of Dallas' 24-20 victory, Lions quarterback Matthew Stafford's pass to tight end Brandon Pettigrew fell incomplete after being defended Cowboys rookie linebacker Anthony Hitchens. Hitchens "face-guarded" Pettigrew and never turned around to find the ball. A penalty flag was thrown for pass interference on Hitchens, but the flag was then picked up with no explanation.

The NFL then said on a penalty flag should have been thrown when Cowboys lineman held Ndamukong Suh on a crucial fourth down play. Dallas went on the score the winning touchdown later in the drive.

BURKE: Blandino explains gaffe in Lions-Cowboys, but concerns remain 

"I haven't seen that before — so I will leave it up to the experts to make the judgment as to why that happen — but I can tell you, if I was a Lions fan, I'd be pretty aggravated," Obama said to the Detroit News.

Obama was in Michigan to visit the Ford Motor Company and said he can't remember a time when officials picked up a flag and had another player who wasn't participating in the game come onto the field. Cowboys receiver Dez Bryant entered the playing field with his helmet off to protest the call. Again, no flag was thrown.

Obama said he can't have too much sympathy for the Lions, because he is a Bears fan.

"You guys were in a lot better position than we were. I'd love to have your defense right now." Obama said.

- Scooby Axson

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