NFL

Tuesday's Sports In Brief

BASEBALL

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) After a nearly decade-long steroids prosecution, Barry Bonds emerged victorious Tuesday when federal prosecutors dropped what was left of their criminal case against the career home runs leader.

The government's pursuit of Bonds ended quietly with a one-paragraph motion by the U.S. Department of Justice announcing Solicitor General Donald B. Verrilli Jr. will not ask the U.S. Supreme Court to review the appellate decision that overturned Bonds' obstruction of justice conviction.

A jury found the former San Francisco Giants star guilty in 2011 for giving a meandering answer to a federal grand jury in 2003 when asked whether his personal trainer gave him anything that required a syringe for self-injection. An 11-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals overturned that conviction in April, and the government had until Wednesday to file for a Supreme Court review.

The jury deadlocked on three counts accusing Bonds of making false statements when he denied receiving steroids or human growth hormone or any substance that required a syringe for self-injection from the trainer, Greg Anderson. The government dismissed those counts in August 2011, and the 9th Circuit barred a retrial on the obstruction charge, citing double jeopardy.

---

NBA

LOS ANGELES (AP) - DeAndre Jordan thought the Dallas Mavericks offered everything he wanted, including a fresh start and a bigger offensive role.

When Jordan thought about it a little more, the craziest free-agent recruitment story in recent NBA history ended with him back on the Los Angeles Clippers.

The league rebounding champion was reintroduced Tuesday by the Clippers, who managed to keep Jordan after he changed his mind about his verbal commitment to Dallas.

While referring to his free agency as ''this whole fiasco,'' Jordan gave a bit of insight into his reasoning for his flip-flop.

Jordan initially thought he needed change in his career after seven seasons with the Clippers, and Dallas offered a starring role.

But Jordan soon realized he would be leaving a title contender in a city he loves.

---

NFL

DALLAS (AP) - A company partly owned by Tony Romo is suing the NFL over a canceled fantasy football event that was to involve the Dallas quarterback and other star players in Las Vegas.

The Fan Expo LLC filed a lawsuit in Dallas County on Tuesday alleging that the league intimidated players with threats of fines and suspensions for associating with what the NFL called a gambling-related event.

The Texas-based company claims the NFL initially approved the event by allowing some members of league-owned media outlets to participate. The suit says family members of some players were called with warnings of discipline.

The lawsuit seeks more than $1 million. The NFL said it was reviewing the lawsuit.

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) - Adrian Peterson and the Minnesota Vikings agreed Tuesday to restructure the final three years of his contract, giving the six-time Pro Bowl running back $20 million in guaranteed money.

The Vikings announced the agreement four days before players will report to training camp, clearing away any lingering haze that surrounded their relationship with Peterson. Initially disinterested in returning to the team following his reinstatement by the NFL, Peterson softened this spring and took part in several offseason practices with the Vikings last month.

Peterson and his lead agent, Ben Dogra, didn't appear to have any leverage in negotiations once Vikings general manager Rick Spielman stood firm in his intent to keep Peterson on the team rather than trade him.

---

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) - UAB football will take the field again in 2017 and remain an FBS program.

Athletic director Mark Ingram said Tuesday that rifle will return in the upcoming season, while bowling will compete in 2016-17 and football in two years.

UAB dropped all three sports in December to cut costs, then announced six months later that they would be reinstated.

The NCAA cleared UAB to resume playing football in 2017 and continue competing in the Football Bowl Subdivision, Ingram said.

''I am so excited that UAB football will return to FBS competition in 2017,'' said Blazers football coach Bill Clark, whose current contract runs through 2016. ''Like our fans, I wanted to light the scoreboard much sooner, but doing it right is more important than doing it fast, and this was our best option.

---

NHL

The NHL is one step closer to establishing expansion teams in Las Vegas and Quebec City.

The league announced Tuesday it has received applications from prospective ownership groups in both markets, a day after a deadline for submissions.

The Las Vegas bid was submitted by billionaire businessman Bill Foley, who has spent the past seven months exploring the level of interest for professional hockey in the community. Montreal-based Quebecor, a Canadian media and telecommunications giant, submitted the bid for Quebec City, which previously served home to the NHL's Nordiques.

As part of their application, bidders were required to submit a $10 million down payment, $2 million of which was nonrefundable.

There are at least two more steps in the expansion process, and the bids require approval from the NHL's Board of Governors.

---

PAN AM GAMES

TORONTO (AP) - The head of the medical commission for the Pan Am Games says there have been eight positive doping tests so far, a figure he puts ''in the average range'' for what would be expected at the multi-sports event.

Dr. Eduardo De Rose, in an interview with The Associated Press on Tuesday, said games officials would carry out 1,500 urine tests and 400 blood tests on 6,000 athletes before the event ends on Sunday.

''All the conditions here are ideal for the detection of doping in the games,'' De Rose said. ''I would take this number as something acceptable. I would not say we are having too many, or too few. We are exactly in the average range.''

De Rose praised the revised doping code published earlier this year by the World Anti-Doping Agency. It allows the targeting of specific banned substances - depending on the sport - and also targeting of specific athletes.

Promoted Stories
Comments

More NFL