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Beyond the Baseline

Serena Williams wins WTA Player of the Year

Serena Williams won her second straight WTA Player of the Year award. (BULENT KILIC/AFP/Getty Images) Serena Williams wins her second straight WTA Player of the Year award after another dominant season. (BULENT KILIC/AFP/Getty Images)

No surprise here: Serena Williams was voted WTA Player of the Year for the second year in a row and fifth time in her career.

Just like last year, when she won two Grand Slam tournaments, a gold medal at the London Olympics and seven titles overall, the 32-year-old Williams left no doubt about her place as the game's best player. But there is one difference between this year and last: After compiling one of the all-time best seasons in 2013, she finished the year at No. 1. She reclaimed the top spot in February to become the oldest WTA No. 1 and never looked back.

Williams' 11 titles (including the French Open and U.S. Open) are the most since Martina Hingis won 12 in 1997, and her 78 victories (against four losses) are the most since Kim Clijsters won 90 a decade ago.

On top of that, she earned $12.4 million, shattering Victoria Azarenka's WTA record of $7.9 million last season. Only three other players have cracked $10 million in prize money: Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic.

In other awards (as voted on by the media), the top-ranked Italian pair of Sara Errani and Roberta Vinci were chosen as the WTA's Doubles Team of the Year. Simona Halep was named Most Improved Player after winning six titles. Eugenie Bouchard, 19, won Best Newcomer after rising 122 spots to finish as the highest-ranked teenager, at No. 32. And Alisa Kleybanova was selected as Comeback Player of the Year for the second season in a row. At the U.S. Open, she earned her first victory over a top-50 player since being diagnosed with Hodgkin's lymphoma in 2011.

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