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YOU TAKE THE BAT

Sept. 06, 1954
Sept. 06, 1954

Table of Contents
Sept. 6, 1954

Pat On The Back
  • Herewith a salute from the editors to men and women of all ages who have fairly earned the good opinion of the world of sport, regardless of whether they have yet earned its tallest headlines

Sportsman
  • The President's love of sports is as much a part of his personality as the Eisenhower grin. And whether opponent is par, a rainbow or visiting team, Ike plays hard

Table Of Contents
Soundtrack
Spectacle
  • Color photographs by Mark Kauffman show what it is like to stand up against Robin Roberts

The Wonderful World Of Sport
Football
Health
Motor Sports
Under 21
  • The ball boys at Forest Hills have to work hard but it's all in fun and sometimes a lucky retriever is rewarded with the champ's racket

Sport In Art
Fisherman's Calendar
Baseball
Horse Racing
Yesterday
Bowling
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over
Last Laugh

YOU TAKE THE BAT

Color photographs by Mark Kauffman show what it is like to stand up against Robin Roberts

In his six and a half seasons as a major-league pitcher, Philadelphia's Robin Roberts has faced roughly 7,000 batters. Probably none of them has had time enough at the plate to study the 27-year-old right-hander's form as deliberately as a reader is able to do on the following pages.

This is an article from the Sept. 6, 1954 issue Original Layout

This month, though he has lost his last three games, Roberts is virtually certain to become the first big-league pitcher in 17 years to win 20 games five years in a row. The last man to do it was Carl Hubbell in the years 1933-37.

A college pitcher at Michigan State, Roberts signed with the Phillies for a $25,000 bonus in 1948. Ever since, he has been astounding opponents with his superbly controlled fast ball, a pitch he is able to throw with uncanny accuracy. So set yourself now as you face the husky (6 ft. 1½ in., 190 lbs.), glowering Roberts on these pages. Draw your bat back as he winds up for a hard one, high and inside. Swing for all you're worth. (If you do as well as the batter, you'll send a dribbler down the third-base line.)

FOUR PHOTOSMARK KAUFFMAN