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Diagnosing a Heart Condition
Terry McDonell
December 10, 2007
In his story on the perils of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (page 90), reporter David Epstein discusses how the congenital heart disease killed his close high school friend and training partner Kevin Richards in 2000. Two years later Epstein gathered Kevin's medical documents and began investigating HCM by talking to cardiologists around the country as well as to the families of victims. A half-miler at Columbia, where he also earned a master's degree in environmental science, Epstein became more concerned the more he learned. "For the vast majority of people sports are healthy, but for people with HCM, like Kevin, they can be deadly," says Epstein, 27, who joined SI after 2 1/2 years as a reporter at the New York Daily News and Inside Higher Ed. "Seeing a young athlete drop dead is something that never leaves you, and it demands investigation. With HCM, we now know that a little knowledge can save a life."
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December 10, 2007

Diagnosing A Heart Condition

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In his story on the perils of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (page 90), reporter David Epstein discusses how the congenital heart disease killed his close high school friend and training partner Kevin Richards in 2000. Two years later Epstein gathered Kevin's medical documents and began investigating HCM by talking to cardiologists around the country as well as to the families of victims. A half-miler at Columbia, where he also earned a master's degree in environmental science, Epstein became more concerned the more he learned. "For the vast majority of people sports are healthy, but for people with HCM, like Kevin, they can be deadly," says Epstein, 27, who joined SI after 2 1/2 years as a reporter at the New York Daily News and Inside Higher Ed. "Seeing a young athlete drop dead is something that never leaves you, and it demands investigation. With HCM, we now know that a little knowledge can save a life."

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