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SLIDE RULES
March 10, 2010
Even before the Games began, Whistler's Olympic luge track had worried some sliders and coaches because of the excessive speeds it generated. After the Day 1 tragedy, officials erected padding and a retaining wall on the final curve and lowered the men's luge start to the women's start. That slowed the sliders but didn't temper the drama for fans. As SI's David Epstein noted, "The sport looks much the same at 80 mph as at 90." U.S. luger Erin Hamlin (left), the 2009 world champion, finished 16th in the women's singles final, which was won by Tatjana Heufner of Germany. Fellow German Felix Loch (top) took the men's gold. In women's skeleton the U.S.'s Noelle Pikus-Pace (above), who missed the 2006 Games after being hit by a stray bobsled in a freak accident, finally got her Olympic chance and finished fourth.
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March 10, 2010

Slide Rules

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Even before the Games began, Whistler's Olympic luge track had worried some sliders and coaches because of the excessive speeds it generated. After the Day 1 tragedy, officials erected padding and a retaining wall on the final curve and lowered the men's luge start to the women's start. That slowed the sliders but didn't temper the drama for fans. As SI's David Epstein noted, "The sport looks much the same at 80 mph as at 90." U.S. luger Erin Hamlin (left), the 2009 world champion, finished 16th in the women's singles final, which was won by Tatjana Heufner of Germany. Fellow German Felix Loch (top) took the men's gold. In women's skeleton the U.S.'s Noelle Pikus-Pace (above), who missed the 2006 Games after being hit by a stray bobsled in a freak accident, finally got her Olympic chance and finished fourth.

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