April 21, 2015

3:55 p.m.

Several jurors have wiped away tears as the father of marathon bombing victim Krystle Campbell described at trial how he called her ''princess.''

William Campbell Jr. testified Tuesday in the penalty phase of the trial of bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev (joh-HAHR' tsahr-NEYE'-ehv).

He says: ''Krystle was the light of my life, every father's dream.''

He wiped his eyes with a handkerchief as he testified, his voice growing hoarse as he said she ''wasn't really a girly girl'' and preferred baseball over more feminine things.

He says he saw her every day, sometimes twice a day. He says the family was very close.

At the hospital, after doctors led them to her room, he says he passed out when he saw it wasn't her. When he woke up, he knew Krystle was gone.

---

3:45 p.m.

The brother of a woman who was killed in the 2013 marathon attacks has testified at the bomber's trial that a mix-up led their family to believe she had survived.

William Campbell III was one of the first witnesses called by prosecutors Tuesday in the penalty phase of the trial of bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev (joh-HAHR' tsahr-NEYE'-ehv).

Campbell is the brother of 29-year-old Krystle Campbell. He says the family received a call from a nurse who told them Krystle was in the hospital. After the family arrived, they were told she was in surgery but would survive.

Hours later, they learned from a homicide detective that Krystle Campbell had died immediately after one of the explosions. The woman in surgery was her friend.

Campbell says they think about Krystle every day.

---

12:30 p.m.

A woman who lost her legs in the Boston Marathon bombing is the first witness to testify in the penalty phase of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev's (joh-HAHR' tsahr-NEYE'-ehvz) trial.

Celeste Corcoran on Tuesday recalled being thrown into the air and landing hard on the sidewalk after the first bomb exploded.

She says: ''I remember hearing just blood-curdling screams.'' She says the pain was so great that she felt like she wanted to die, but she quickly regained her resolve to live when she thought of her family.

Corcoran says she learned only after her legs were amputated that her 17-year-old daughter, Sydney, had also been seriously hurt and almost bled to death. The mother and daughter shared a hospital room for weeks, then had adjoining rooms at a rehabilitation hospital.

---

11:15 a.m.

A prosecutor has shown jurors a photograph of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev (joh-HAHR' tsahr-NEYE'-ehv) giving the middle finger to a video camera in his jail cell three months after he bombed the Boston Marathon.

The photo was taken from a video surveillance camera in Tsarnaev's cell when he was arraigned on the bombing charges in July 2013.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Nadine Pellegrini says, ''This is Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, unconcerned, unrepentant and unchanged.''

With that, she finished her opening statement in the penalty phase of Tsarnaev's federal death penalty trial Tuesday.

Jurors must decide whether to sentence Tsarnaev to life in prison or to death. If one of them votes against the death penalty, the sentence will automatically be life in prison.

---

10:55 a.m.

A prosecutor has told jurors in the trial of Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev (joh-HAHR' tsahr-NEYE'-ehv) that they will come to know the four people he killed and ''why their lives mattered.''

Prosecutor Nadine Pellegrini told the jury in her opening statement of the penalty phase that the killings were ''unbearable, indescribable, inexcusable and senseless.''

She says: ''You know how they died - now you need to know how they lived. You need to know and to understand why their lives mattered.''

Pellegrini showed enlarged photographs of the four victims behind her.

She says: ''They had time to be scared and frightened. They had no time to say goodbye. That is the very essence of terror.''

Three people died in the bombings. A Massachusetts Institute of Technology police officer was killed days later.

---

10:35 a.m.

The judge overseeing the federal death penalty trial of Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev (joh-HAHR' tsahr-NEYE'-ehv) has told jurors they must keep an open mind on what punishment the defendant should receive.

Judge George O'Toole spoke to jurors Tuesday before the start of the penalty phase of Tsarnaev's trial.

He told them they must weigh aggravating factors proven by prosecutors against mitigating factors shown by Tsarnaev's lawyers to decide whether Tsarnaev should be sentenced to life in prison or be executed.

The judge told jurors that if even one of them votes against the death penalty, the sentence will automatically be life in prison.

Three people were killed and more than 260 were injured in the 2013 bombings.

Tsarnaev was convicted of all charges in the guilt phase of the trial.

---

10:20 a.m.

About a dozen anti-death penalty protesters are demonstrating outside the federal courthouse as a jury gets ready to hear evidence on what punishment Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev (joh-HAHR' tsahr-NEYE'-ehv) should receive.

Tsarnaev's lawyers and a prosecutor met with Judge George O'Toole Jr. for nearly an hour Tuesday morning as the penalty phase of Tsarnaev's trial was about to begin.

Tsarnaev was convicted on all 30 federal charges against him. The same jury will now hear evidence on whether he deserves life in prison or the death penalty.

Tsarnaev's lawyers say he doesn't deserve death because he was a 19-year-old under the influence of his domineering brother.

Prosecutors contend Tsarnaev deserves the ultimate punishment.

Three people were killed and more than 260 were injured in the 2013 bombings.

You May Like