July 29, 2016

SCITUATE, R.I. (AP) The Latest on the investigation into Curt Schilling's failed video game company finding no criminal violations (all times local):

4:45 p.m.

Former Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling says authorities investigating the failed deal with his video game company were sent on a ''witch hunt.''

WPRI-TV asked the former ballplayer on Friday for his reaction to Rhode Island authorities announcing they found ''no provable criminal violations'' of state law after a yearslong investigation into Schilling's 38 Studios.

Schilling replied on Twitter he's ''disgusted'' that authorities were sent on a ''witch hunt.''

He says Rhode Island could have saved millions if officials realized years ago that there were no criminal violations.

His lawyer couldn't immediately be reached to comment further on his behalf.

Schilling's company relocated to Rhode Island from Massachusetts in 2010 in exchange for a $75 million state loan guarantee. It later went bankrupt, leaving taxpayers on the hook.

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4:10 p.m.

An investigation into former Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling's failed video game company, 38 Studios, has resulted in no criminal violations.

Rhode Island State Police Col. Steven G. O'Donnell and Attorney General Peter Kilmartin announced the results of the yearslong investigation Friday.

They say there are ''no provable criminal violations'' of state law. Nearly 150 people were interviewed and thousands of documents reviewed.

O'Donnell says a bad deal doesn't always equate to an indictment.

The former ballplayer's company relocated to Rhode Island from Massachusetts in 2010 in exchange for a $75 million state loan guarantee. It later went bankrupt, leaving taxpayers on the hook.

The state's economic development agency sued Schilling and others who aided the deal to try to recoup the money.

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3 p.m.

Rhode Island authorities are announcing the results of the criminal investigation into Curt Schilling's failed video game company, 38 Studios.

State Police Col. Steven G. O'Donnell and Attorney General Peter Kilmartin are scheduled to discuss the results Friday at State Police Headquarters in North Scituate, Rhode Island.

They declined to release any details of the years-long investigation beforehand.

The former ballplayer's company relocated to Rhode Island from Massachusetts in 2010 in exchange for a $75 million state loan guarantee. It later went bankrupt, leaving taxpayers on the hook.

A criminal investigation into the deal was launched and the state's economic development agency sued Schilling and others who aided the deal to try to recoup the money.

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission also sued, alleging that investors were defrauded.

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