The Latest: Necropsy shows Iditarod dog overheated on flight

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) The Latest on the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race (all times local):

7:30 p.m.

Veteran musher Wade Marrs, of Alaska, was the first musher to reach Unalakleet on the Norton Sound Coast on Sunday night.

Marrs was the third competitor out of Kaltag. He left at 5:28 a.m.

This year's race across nearly 1,000 miles of grueling Alaska wilderness started March 6 in Fairbanks. The winner is expected early this week in the town of Nome, along Alaska's frozen Bering Sea coast.

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12:10 p.m.

Officials with the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race say an injured dog that died while being flown to Anchorage showed signs of overheating.

The 2-year-old male on musher Scott Smith's team died Friday while in transit from the Galena checkpoint.

Smith dropped the dog from the team Tuesday because of a wrist injury.

Race officials say in a news release that necropsy findings were consistent with hyperthermia, though further testing will be conducted. They say the sequence of events that contributed to the warm temperature in the aircraft also are being reviewed.

Late Thursday, a dog from musher Seth Barnes' team died near Galena. Race officials say a necropsy also will be conducted on that 2-year-old male.

The Iditarod across nearly 1,000 miles of wilderness started March 6 in Fairbanks.

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8 a.m.

A father and son have taken the lead in Alaska's Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race.

Two-time champion Mitch Seavey was the first musher to leave the village of Kaltag on Sunday. But his son, current Iditarod champion Dallas Seavey, was close behind.

Mitch Seavey departed the checkpoint at 4:40 a.m., while Dallas Seavey left just five minutes later.

The third racer out of Kaltag was veteran musher Wade Marrs of Alaska, who took off at 5:28 a.m.

Behind him was Nicolas Petit, a native of France who lives just south of Anchorage. Petit left the checkpoint at 6:35 a.m.

Rounding out the top five was Joar Leifseth Ulsom of Norway, who departed Kaltag at 6:50 a.m.

The race across nearly 1,000 miles of wilderness started March 6 in Fairbanks. The winner is expected early this week in Nome, along the Bering Sea coast.

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