Behind the shadowy practice of 'courtsiding' at the US Open

NEW YORK (AP) The arrest of an Estonian man last week for trespassing at the U.S. Open has renewed questions about a practice called courtsiding.

Tennis officials say the man was surreptitiously collecting instant data for gamblers who use online exchanges to bet all on angles of professional tennis matches as they unfold in real time.

He was one of eight people ejected from the New York tournament so far this year because of suspicions of courtsiding.

A private enforcement team called the Tennis Integrity Unit spotted the man during a match featuring No. 13 seed Petra Kvitova.

Experts say courtsiders are trying to get match data to gamblers so fast that it gives them an edge in contests that let them bet on the outcome of the match while it's in progress.

SI Apps
We've Got Apps Too
Get expert analysis, unrivaled access, and the award-winning storytelling only SI can provide — from Peter King, Tom Verducci, Lee Jenkins, Grant Wahl, Andy Staples and more — delivered straight to you, along with up-to-the-minute news and live scores.