This was no ordinary team, and no ordinary Sugar Bowl.

Having lost quarterback Joe Namath to a suspension, Alabama was not even supposed to be on the same field as Ole Miss. 

Coach Paul Bryant and Alabama arrive in New Orleans for the Sugar Bowl.

Coach Paul Bryant and Alabama arrive in New Orleans for the Sugar Bowl.

Ole Miss also had the best rushing defense in the nation coming into the game. 

Alabama’s offense was stifled throughout, but the Crimson Tide defense rose to the occasion causing nine Ole Miss turnovers. 

From the game program.

From the game program.

Bama's star running back tandem, Mike Fracchia and Benny Nelson

Bama's star running back tandem, Mike Fracchia and Benny Nelson.

But that's not what most people remember about the game. 

An added and unexpected element was that a substantial snowstorm hit New Orleans the day before kickoff. In 1964, the Sugar Bowl was played outdoors in Tulane Stadium which one day a year was named the Sugar Bowl. The field was ringed with snow for the game.

Alabama assistant coach Jimmy Sharpe the day before the Sugar Bowl.

Alabama assistant coach Jimmy Sharpe the day before the Sugar Bowl.

The day before the 1964 Sugar Bowl.

A snowstorm hit New Orleans the day before the 1964 Sugar Bowl. 

Alabama's chances in the 1964 Sugar Bowl were said to be the same as snow falling in New Orleans.

Alabama's chances in the 1964 Sugar Bowl were said to be the same as snow falling in New Orleans.

Alabama relied on field goal kicker Tim Davis who had four field goals, of 31, 46, 22 and 48 yards, as Alabama won 12-7. Davis was named MVP of the game.

His four field goals were a bowl record and his 48-yarder was the longest in bowl history at the time.

Field goal kicker and Sugar Bowl star, Tim Davis at practice for the Sugar Bowl.

Field goal kicker and Sugar Bowl star, Tim Davis at practice for the Sugar Bowl. 

Sophomore Steve Sloan may not have had the best afternoon, but he showed poise and avoided costly mistakes as Alabama slowly built on an early lead it would never relinquish.  

It was 3-0 after the first quarter, 9-0 at halftime and 12-0 going into the final quarter. 

The Rebels finally got on the scoreboard when Larry Smith took a 5-yard pass from Perry Lee Dunn. 

Thanks to six lost fumbles and three interceptions, Ole Miss ended up with more turnovers than points. The Rebels may have had more yards, but the Crimson Tide controlled the game by running 69 plays to only 48 for the losing side.

In the final quarter the Tide defense stopped the Rebels on Alabama’s 2, 9 and 28-yard lines to seal the victory.