Lightning general manager Jay Feaster doesn't expect to make any major moves

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TAMPA, Fla. - General manager Jay Feaster made it very clear: the slumping Tampa Bay Lightning don't plan to make any major moves for now.

"I think the answers for right now have to come from within," Feaster said Saturday after Tampa Bay lost 4-2 to Philadelphia. "Certainly until we get the resolution of the sale situation."

The Lightning's current owner, Palace Sports and Entertainment, has been talking about a potential sale of the franchise to a group led by Los Angeles movie producer Oren Koules.

Tampa Bay (15-21-3) has lost nine of 11, and are six games under .500 for the first time since the end of the 2001-02 season.

Feaster again said the Lightning's "Big 3" of forwards Vincent Lecavalier, Martin St. Louis and Brad Richards will not be traded.

"That's a non-starter. That's not going to happen," Feaster said.

Tampa Bay coach John Tortorella agrees with Feaster's overall assessment.

"There's no help coming," Tortorella said. "This is our mess. We have to figure it out."

The Lightning open a four-game road trip Tuesday at Toronto. Tampa Bay is 3-13-1 away from home this season.

"It will be a tough," Tampa Bay centre Brad Richards said. "Our back is against the wall. It could be good for us. Us against the world mentality. You just wonder when the puck will bounce your way."

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