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Trevor Daley's mom passed away a week after seeing her son lift the Stanley Cup

Trevor Daley was injured in the conference final and did not play in the Cup final, but Sidney Crosby shared the story that Daley's mother was battling cancer and wanted to see her son lift the Stanley Cup.
The Hockey News

The Hockey News

One of the most emotional moments of the Stanley Cup final was watching Pittsburgh Penguins captain Sidney Crosby making the first pass of the Cup to defenseman Trevor Daley.

Daley was injured in the conference final and did not play in the Cup final, but Crosby shared the story that Daley's mother was battling cancer and wanted to see her son lift the Stanley Cup. He did just that, taking the Cup for a skate for the first time in his 12-year career after the Penguins defeated the Sharks.

Daley's mother, Trudy, passed away a little over a week later, on June 21, at 51.

After learning about his ailing mother, Crosby assured Daley he would be the first to get the Cup. "It was pretty special," Daley said. "He's a great player, but he's an even better person. There's not much more you can say about that guy. He's a special guy."

Daley may not have played because of a broken ankle, but he fulfilled his mother's last wish, skating with the Cup in full uniform.

Condolences go out to the entire Daley family.

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