Cavs' James changed shooting motion after elbow injury

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Cleveland Cavaliers superstar LeBron James has been showing off a fresh new jumper so far this season, and the four-time MVP tells ESPN that an elbow injury he suffered over the summer forced him to change his shooting motion.

After the Cavs lost to the Golden State Warriors in the 2017 Finals, James tells ESPN that his right shooting elbow mysteriously swelled to the size of a tennis ball.

James had his elbow medically examined, with X-rays coming back negative and an MRI showing no structural damage.

"I don't know where it came from," James told ESPN after the Cavs' win over the Chicago Bulls on Tuesday. "I was working out in L.A. in late June, and my wife was like, 'What's wrong with your elbow?' I'm like, 'What?' ... The weirdest s---."

The elbow ailment was preventing James to shoot the way he normally does without experiencing discomfort, so the Cavs' do-it-all forward altered his shot so he could shoot pain-free.

James goes on to say he changed his form on his own and didn't revert back to his old one, even after the swelling in his elbow diminished.

"I shoot it higher," James said to ESPN. "When the swelling went down, I just continued to do the same motion. My free throws, my 3s, my pullups, all that. It was just me. I'm at a point now in my career where I know if I need to make an adjustment here or there."

Through his first four games of the season, LeBron is averaging 27.3 points while shooting a staggering 61.4 percent from the field and 44.4 percent beyond the arc.

The King is also hitting 88.2 percent from the free throw line and wants to keep it that way moving forward.

"I want to shoot 80 [percent] from the free throw line, man," James told ESPN. "That's my only goal. That's my last goal of my NBA career. That's my last one. I've done everything else."

James and the Cavs can only hope he keeps up this stellar perimeter shooting for the entire year.

Having a fresh and healthy LeBron for the playoffs is the number one priority for Cleveland, so if James can rely on his jumpshot more in the regular season, he'll be more spry on his drives to the hoop come postseason time.