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Watt's value isn't restricted to any one position—he's a sheer terror no matter where he lines up.

By Doug Farrar
July 07, 2016

Watt's value isn't restricted to any one position—he's a sheer terror no matter where he lines up. Last season, per Pro Football Focus, he lined up at end on 63.2% of his snaps, which is the only reason he wasn't the best interior defender by a country mile. As a pass rusher, Watt succeeds no matter where he is because he has a special positional understanding of his responsibilities and how to maximize the results. As a nose tackle, three-tech or 4i rusher, he can drive blockers back with his upper-body strength and ability to peel off to a shoulder and drive his opponent back. On the edge—everywhere from 5-tech end to wide-nine sack artist—is where Watt shows his rare speed-to-power and precise understanding of angular leverage. If you were to take the great Bruce Smith and turn him into an every-gap monster (and in this day and age, Smith might have been asked to do exactly that), you'd have the player Watt is now.

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