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All 82: Every Player Who Has Taken the Field and What They Have Done

From the most important guys who have suited up to those who quickly came and went, this is the complete list of the NFL's biggest roster this season.

NASHVILLE – Piled one on top of another, the names of the 82 players who have taken the field for the Tennessee Titans this season look like some massive Walgreen’s receipt on steroids.

Seen in that frame of reference, maybe it’s not so surprising the Titans are just two shy of tying the NFL record for number of players used in a single season.

How many of those 82 names could the most hard-core Titans fans spit out if pressed? How many of the 12 defensive linemen alone are memorable?

To pay tribute to the many who’ve worn the two-tone blue already this season, we’ve listed each one below – with a one-sentence description of their tenure to date.

We’ve also divided them into five categories, based on the contributions – or lack thereof – they’ve made so far this season.

Here are the 82:

Couldn’t Have Done It Without Them

(21 players)

OFFENSE

OL

Nate Davis – There’s been a regression in Davis’ game this season -- especially in pass-blocking -- but he’s still played more than 600 snaps for one of the league’s better offenses.

Ben Jones – Not a dominant lineman, but has been typically tough, smart and reliable in the middle of the line.

Taylor Lewan – Has missed three full games and chunks of others, but his play has improved as he’s gotten healthier.

David Quessenberry – Wasn’t necessarily expected to be team’s starting right tackle when camp began but has anchored the right side and played more offensive snaps than any other player.

Rodger Saffold – He’s a talented gamer who’s battling through injury but hasn’t been effective as in years past.

QB

Ryan Tannehill – His interception rate is higher this year, but credit Tannehill with playing his best football when it’s mattered most.

RB

Derrick Henry – What more needs to be said about a back who gained 937 yards in eight games before suffering a foot injury, and might have been the first player to top 2,000 yards in consecutive seasons?

TE

Geoff Swaim – Always considered a solid blocker, Swaim has been a pleasant surprise with 19 catches for 131 yards and two touchdowns, and he’s also played nearly half the team’s special-teams snaps.

WR

A.J. Brown – It’s been an up-and-down season for Brown – highlighted by three straight games over 90 receiving yards – and the Titans are desperate for more big numbers from him.

DEFENSE

DB

Kevin Byard – A bounce-back season is way underselling the huge contributions of Byard, who should be in the Defensive Player of the Year discussion.

Kristian Fulton – Has been limited to six games because of injury, but he’s made huge strides since his rookie season, perhaps on his way to being a shutdown corner.

Amani Hooker – His progress has continued this year, in his first season as a starter, as Hooker has proven to be a great complement for Byard.

Jackrabbit Jenkins – He’s given up four touchdown passes (tied for sixth-most in the league, per Pro Football Focus), but Jenkins has done a solid job of steering clear of too many big plays against him.

DL

Denico Autry – He’s easily been the Titans’ best offseason addition, having already totaled five sacks, six tackles for loss and 14 quarterback hits while playing both on the interior and outside of the line.

Jeffery Simmons – Another candidate for defensive player of the year, Simmons is in the midst of a monster year – 34 tackles, 7.5 sacks, nine tackles for loss and 13 quarterback hits.

LB

Ola Adeniyi – Adeniyi has been one of the Titans’ top special teamers, playing over 75 percent of special-teams snaps, and has chipped in with more defense than expected.

Harold Landry – In a contract year, Landry is having a career season, with 10 quarterback sacks, 10 tackles for loss and 19 quarterback hits in 10 games.

David Long – What a season it’s been for Long, who’s stepped into the starting lineup and excelled, posting a team-high 66 tackles in 10 games.

SPECIAL TEAMS

LS

Morgan Cox – He’s been completely anonymous, which is exactly what every team wants out of a long snapper – no mistakes.

P

Brett Kern – Kern missed three games due to injury, but he’s still cranking away in his 15th season, evidenced by a 42.2 net-punting average that’s better than his career average of 41.6.

K

Randy Bullock – The Titans’ kicking position hasn’t seen this kind of stability since Ryan Succop’s best years, as Bullock has connected on 18-of-20 field-goal attempts.

Key Contributors

(12 players)

OFFENSE

TE

MyCole Pruitt – Who would have guessed Pruitt would be tied for the team lead with three touchdown catches after 10 games?

WR

Marcus Johnson – Johnson registered his breakout game last Sunday with five catches for 100 yards, and the Titans will need more of that with Julio Jones out.

Julio Jones – Injuries have limited Jones to just six games and 21 catches in a disappointing season, but he has averaged over 16 yards on those receptions.

Chester Rogers – Rogers has given the Titans some flexibility in the passing offense, and he’s brought life to the team’s punt-return game, averaging 11.5 yards per return.

Nick Westbrook-Ikhine – Westbrook-Ikhine’s versatility has been well-documented, as he’s contributed 16 catches (nine for first downs), served as a quality blocker and played on more than 50 percent of the Titans’ special-teams snaps.

DEFENSE

DB

Dane Cruikshank – Cruikshank mostly stayed healthy before he went on IR last week and had taken a major step forward in terms of being a defensive contributor this season, while also providing his customary quality work on special teams.

Chris Jackson – Jackson had a very long day at the office last Sunday against the Saints, but overall has been a reliable defensive and special-teams performer this season, helping on both the inside and outside.

Elijah Molden – Molden has come a long way from the early weeks of the season and is now using his intelligence and technique to help offset a lack of speed.

DL

Teair Tart – Tart had big shoes to fill stepping in for DaQuan Jones at nose tackle, and he’s been a solid performer in the middle when healthy.

LB

Jayon Brown – Injuries have limited him to five games – and three full games – but he’s made his presence felt when on the field, averaging eight tackles in those three full contests.

Bud Dupree – It’s been slow going for the big offseason signing, and just as he appeared to be getting over his knee injury, Dupree suffered an abdominal injury last Sunday.

Rashaan Evans – It hasn’t been a good season for Evans overall, but he’d played two of his best games before suffering the ankle injury that’s sidelined him for three contests.

Role Players

(11 players)

OFFENSE

OL

Aaron Brewer – He’s undersized at 6-1 and 274 pounds, but he’s a reliable back-up that always battles.

RB

Khari Blasingame – Blasingame has only played 46 offensive snaps this season, but adds muscle to the special teams, where Blasingame has played about 23 percent of the team’s snaps.

Jeremy McNichols – McNichol’s big contribution has come out of the backfield as a receiving option, as he has 25 catches in 10 games – including nine for first downs.

TE

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Anthony Firkser – It seemed reasonable to expect big things from Firkser this season after he made 39 catches last year, but the Titans’ need for blocking at the position appears to be much of the reason why he’s been limited to 14 catches for 112 yards.

DEFENSE

DB

Breon Borders – Borders sank on the depth chart as the season progressed (he’s now on the practice squad), but he did see an abundance of work on the Titans’ special teams units.

Matthias Farley – He’s been a boost to the special teams, where Farley has played over 79 percent of the snaps this year – and totaled four tackles against the Saints last Sunday.

DL

Naquan Jones – The undrafted free agent has proven a nice find on the interior of the defensive line, as he’s played more than 20 defensive snaps in five of the last six games.

Larrell Murchison – Murchison is a rotational piece in the Titans’ defensive line, one who’s shown some improvement over his rookie season.

LB

Nick Dzubnar – Dzubnar leads all Titans in special-teams snaps (230), and his eight special-teams tackles are second only to Adeniyi’s nine.

Joe Jones – He’s not a household name, so it might surprise you that Jones has played almost 80 percent of the Titans’ special-teams over the past six weeks.

Monty Rice – The rookie hasn’t seen a lot of playing time, but he may get more after a nice game against the Saints, when Rice totaled 11 tackles and one quarterback sacks.

Spot Appearances

(24 players)

OFFENSE

QB

Logan Woodside – Woodside has taken the Titans’ final snap in three victories this season, a human victory cigar.

OL

Bobby Hart – It was a short but lively run for Hart – who played a combined 100 snaps in two of his three games for the Titans before getting released.

Kendall Lamm – It’s fair to say the Titans probably expected more of Lamm, who was a potential contender for a starting right tackle job but has struggled at times as a back-up.

Corey Levin – Levin was pressed into service against Jacksonville with 27 snaps but has seen just five other offensive snaps.

Dillon Radunz – From all accounts, Radunz – the team’s second-round draft pick earlier this year – has a great attitude and work ethic, but the fact he’s played so few offensive snaps at this point is a big disappointment.

Ty Sambrailo – Sambrailo was a valuable reserve for two of the first four games, before surprisingly deciding he’d had enough and retiring in mid-October.

RB

Tory Carter – His physical nature has earned Carter a home on special teams, and he’s seeing a few more snaps offensively now as well.

D’Onta Foreman – He’s looked the best of the Titans’ three candidates trying to fill the shoes of Henry, so his snaps may start to increase.

Dontrell Hilliard – Hilliard jumped in and played 16 special-teams snaps days after joining the Titans, and though he’s back on the practice squad, the Titans seem to like his potential.

Adrian Peterson – It would be quite the story if the 36-year-old Peterson was able to jump-start the Titans, but we haven’t seen much evidence of it yet, as he has 18 carries for 42 yards.

TE

Tommy Hudson – Hudson had seemingly carved out a niche for himself as a blocking tight end before suffering a season-ending injury in Week 4.

WR

Cam Batson – Batson didn’t get much of a chance to contribute this year, making just two catches in four games before heading to injured reserve.

Dez Fitzpatrick – Cut before the season, Fitzpatrick – a fourth-round draft pick in May – has progressed well enough that he made his NFL debut with a catch last week.

Mason Kinsey – The mere fact that Kinsey – from Division III Berry College – earned a few snaps this year before returning to the practice squad – is an impressive accomplishment.

Racey McMath – McMath was doing some good work on special teams before he was hurt, and it will be interesting to see if he can develop into more of a receiver.

Josh Reynolds – Reynolds turned into a major disappointment, signed as a potential No. 2 receiver before fizzling out with just 10 catches in five games before his release.

DEFENSE

DB

Brady Breeze – It’s hard to make much of an evaluation of the rookie safety, who missed much of training camp and the first six weeks of the season before playing some special teams in three recent games.

Jamal Carter – Played 13 special-teams snaps against Jacksonville, now on the practice squad.

Chris Jones – Jones seems to be gaining the trust of coaches, as he was signed from the practice squad to the 53-man roster and saw decent playing time against the Chiefs and the Rams.

Greg Mabin – Like Jones, Mabin was another defensive back who was forced into playing time – and responded admirably against the Chiefs and Colts before getting hurt.

DL

Amani Bledsoe – His second stint with the Titans lasted five games, and he saw his playing time gradually decline before getting released.

Kyle Peko – Another of the many interior linemen who’ve rotated through Nashville, Peko had a nice debut with Tennessee last Sunday – helping bolster a defense that was without Tart.

LB

Dylan Cole – His fumble-causing hit made quite an impact against the Saints, and he was rewarded by getting signed from the practice squad to the 53-man roster.

Derick Roberson – The Titans are hoping he can bring some pressure off the edge – especially in light of Dupree’s injury -- after getting activated back to the 53-man roster Tuesday.

Only Memories Remain

(14 players)

OFFENSE

RB

Darrynton Evans – After being limited by injury to a combined six games and 16 rushes in his first two seasons, there are bound to be questions about the future of the Titans’ third-round pick in 2020.

Mekhi Sargent – He was a great training-camp story, but like so many others before him, it didn’t pan out in the regular season – a couple of carries before he was released.

DEFENSE

DB

Caleb Farley – The Titans will have to hope their 2021 first-round pick can come back from another ACL tear, the second of his football career coming this year, just as he was starting to rebound from back surgery.

Bradley McDougald – Signed as hopeful help when the Titans were without Hooker, McDougald made a couple of big blunders in Seattle that ended his Titans career after two games.

DL

Eli Ankou – Ankou was another of the Titans’ many whirlwind defensive-line relationships, as – in the span of a week -- he signed to the practice squad, earned a spot on the 53-man roster, played 18 snaps against Indianapolis and was released.

Woodrow Hamilton – It was a two-game stint for Hamilton on the defensive-line carousel.

Caraun Reid – The Jacksonville game was Reid’s first and last for the Titans, as he played 12 snaps before returning to the practice squad and eventually getting released.

Anthony Rush – This may sound like a broken record, but he had a short stint on the defensive line, playing Weeks 1 and 2 before getting cut.

LB

Sharif Finch – Finch’s first stint with the Titans lasted two seasons, but his second lasted one game – and five snaps -- against the Jets.

John Simon – A connection of Titans coach Mike Vrabel’s from back in his Houston days, Simon spent enough time in training camp and on the practice squad that it seems surprising he played in just one regular-season game before he was released.

Rashad Weaver – The Titans liked the potential of this fourth-round 2021 pick, but the 6-4, 259-pound saw his season come to an end after just two games, due to a nasty leg injury.

Avery Williamson – This seemed like a great homecoming story for the Milan, TN, native, after he was signed off Denver’s practice squad, but he didn’t play a defensive snap in two games here before getting released.

SPECIAL TEAMS

K

Michael Badgley – Badgley continued a string of bad Titans kickers, as he missed one-of-two field-goal attempts and one extra-point attempt in his lone appearance.

P

Johnny Townsend – Townsend’s first Titans punt was a shank job that went 12 yards, but he actually filled in pretty well for Kern over the course of three games.