WADA unveils list of disqualified athlete support personnel

MONTREAL (AP) The World Anti-Doping Agency has published a list of 114 support staff with ''disqualifying status,'' giving athletes advance notice of some people to avoid when they're considering coaches, trainers or medical consultants.

Under the new Prohibited Association rule, athletes subject to the WADA code are not allowed to work with support personnel who are currently sanctioned, or have been sanctioned within the previous six years, for an anti-doping rule violation.

It leaves athletes open to sanctions for knowingly working with support personnel who have been banned.

WADA president Craig Reedie said Monday that anti-doping authorities are ''increasingly of the belief that athletes do not dope alone, and that often there is a member of their entourage encouraging them to cheat.''

He said the new rules sent a message to athletes: ''Do not associate with individuals that have breached anti-doping rules as they could encourage you to cheat the system and to rob your fellow athletes of their right to clean sport.''

''By publishing this list, WADA is helping athletes know which individuals to evade if they are to avoid violating the rules themselves,'' he said.

The list, which is expected to be updated on WADA's website every three months, does not include cases that are currently under appeal.

Anti-doping agencies in some countries previously made a list of banned coaches and trainers available in certain cases, and have gone after support personal before.

The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency gave a lifetime ban to Trevor Graham, who worked with Marion Jones, Tim Montgomery and others involved in doping scandals.

Graham and Jon Drummond, who was banned last December for eight years by USADA for his role in sprinter Tyson Gay's doping case, were included on WADA's list of 114.

More than half of the staff on the list are Italians, something that Italian Olympic Committee president Giovanni Malago said was a sign of a robust anti-doping program.

''The fact that there are 61 Italians on this list is a matter of pride for us,'' Malago said. ''It means we're doing our job seriously.''

The list, which covers sports as diverse as weightlifting and basketball, includes some staff who had never previously been declared to be serving bans. They include Pavel Korolyov, a coach for Russian cyclists, and Evgeny Evsukov, the coach for a Russian race walker who withdrew from the world championships last month amid doping allegations.

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AP sportswriters James Ellingworth in Moscow and Andrew Dampf in Rome contributed to this report.

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