Search

ATHLETE AND ARTIST

Aug. 16, 1954
Aug. 16, 1954

Table of Contents
Aug. 16, 1954

Pat On The Back
  • Herewith a salute from the editors to men and women of all ages who have fairly earned the good opinion of the world of sport, regardless of whether they have yet earned tallest headlines

Table of Contents
Spectacle
The Wonderful World Of Sport
New Golden Age
Western Trout
Under 21
  • An Australian bumarin—better known as boomerang—can outfly a Mickey Mantle home run. But unlike a baseball, this sickle-shaped piece of wood will twirl right back to you

Health
  • Hikers and golfers are among its many victims and the blistering itch can be cured only by time

Baseball
Golf
A Place To Be
Horse Racing
Sport In Art
Football
Column Of The Week
Fisherman's Calendar
Sporting Look
Boxing
Tennis
  • By William F. Talbert

    He's had plenty this season and it's nobody's fault but his own

Yesterday
Last Laugh

ATHLETE AND ARTIST

George Bellows, noted for boxing art, did other sports masterpieces

As an art student in New York, fresh out of Ohio State University where he excelled in baseball and basketball, George Bellows augmented his small finances by playing shortstop with semiprofessional teams. A casual visit to a back-room boxing match quickened his interest in that then-illegal sport and later produced the magnificent paintings and lithographs for which he is most famous. Bellows loved the flashing color of muscular bodies as they lunged and bent in action, but he was not limited to the smoke-laden, sweat-scented sporting clubs. He also painted the more fashionable sports of the wind-clean out-of-doors.

This is an article from the Aug. 16, 1954 issue Original Layout

At Newport's vine-clad social center, the Casino, built in 1880 by James Gordon Bennett Jr. from designs by Stanford White, Bellows painted the delightful scene (above) of a tennis match on the velvety grass courts. It was here in 1881 that Richard Dudley Sears won the first national tennis championship. In succeeding years beruffled and parasoled Belmonts, Astors and Vanderbilts assembled for the matches that helped tennis grow into a national sport. On these same courts the annual Newport Invitational Tennis Tournament is being played this week.

George Bellows' influence on American art was as great as the Casino's on tennis. His work carried a compelling impact after the academic conservatism of the old pictures at the turn of the century. Unimpressed by European traditions, he never left his native country but ranged the U.S., painting Americans at their sports and games. By the time he died in 1925 (at 42), Bellows' brush had captured such diverse scenes as the lush polo fields of the East and the rocky fishing grounds of the West (following pages).

PAINTED FROM SKETCHES DONE IN THE SUMMER OF 1919, "TENNIS AT NEWPORT" IS RICH WITH WARMTH OF LATE AFTERNOON SUN

"Polo Players" demonstrates Bellows' brilliant palette and his ability to catch an emotional, dramatic moment of action. This scene, painted in 1910 at the country estate of Jay Gould in Lakewood, N.J., captures the essence of the fashionable game.

"THE FISHERMAN" WAS PAINTED IN 1917 WHEN BELLOWS VISITED CARMEL ON THE CALIFORNIA COAST

ILLUSTRATIONCOURTESY OF H. V. ALLISON GALLERYILLUSTRATIONCOURTESY OF MR. AND MRS. JOHN HAY WHITNEYILLUSTRATIONCOURTESY OF MRS. CHARLES S. PAYSON