19th Hole: Some New Readers Comment On Vol. 1, No. 1

August 29, 1954

SIRS:
YOU'VE SCORED TOUCHDOWN, HOME RUN, GOAL, STRIKE, EAGLE, ACE, RINGER, CHECKERED'FLAG, KNOCKOUT, FALL, ROUGE, HAT TRICK, CHECKMATE WITH YOUR FIRST ISSUE.
ELMER BLASCO
ST. LOUIS

SIRS:
A GREAT JOB AND A SURE WINNER.
DAVE MAYER
NEW YORK

SIRS:
I LIKED AND DISLIKED YOUR FIRST ISSUE OF SPORTS ILLUSTRATED. HEARTILY DO I ENDORSE YOUR ESCAPE FROM THE QUOTE ME TOO UNQUOTE ATTITUDE OF PUBLICATIONS. DISLIKE WAS MY OWN FAULT FOR HAVING BECOME USED TO SPORT PRESENTATION BY OTHER MAGAZINES. LATER, I CONCLUDED THAT I LIKED THE MAGAZINE MORE THAN I DISLIKED IT AND THAT THE ENTIRE SPORT WORLD SHOULD CONGRATULATE TIME INC. FOR ITS STEP TAKEN IN BEHALF OF ALL SPORTS. YOU CERTAINLY SET AN EXCITING PACE. EAGERLY DO I AWAIT YOUR SECOND AND SUBSEQUENT ISSUES.
NICK KERBAWY
GENERAL MANAGER
DETROIT LIONS FOOTBALL CLUB
DETROIT

SIRS:
JUST FINISHED READING YOUR FIRST ISSUE FROM COVER TO COVER. CONGRATULATIONS ON A SUPERB JOB.
ALAN R. WILE
SAYBROOK, CONN.

SIRS:
THIS IS A FINE BOOK—THE BEST I HAVE SEEN.
E. F. KRAUTTER
SO. ORANGE, N.J.

SIRS:
JUST READ YOUR FIRST ISSUE—THINK IT'S REAL GOOD.
JAMES MORTON
PALM SPRINGS, CALIF.

SIRS:
YOUR FIRST ISSUE OF SPORTS RECEIVED WITH MIXED REACTIONS. RARELY IF EVER HAS A TRACK EVENT BEEN SO MAGNIFICENTLY REPORTED AS IN DUEL OF THE FOUR-MINUTE MEN. THE AUTHOR PERCEIVED AS NO OTHER SPORTS REPORTER EVER DID THE VERY HEART AND SOUL OF THE DISTANCE RUNNER. HOW IN THE SAME ISSUE A SPORTING EVENT COMMANDING AS WIDESPREAD INTEREST AS THE GOLD CUP RACE (350,000 SPECTATORS) COULD BE INSULTED BY ONLY SEVEN AND ONE HALF LINES IN FINE PRINT ON PAGE 112 WHILE AN ARTICLE ON BASEBALL AND BUBBLEGUM WAS FEATURE IS BEYOND MY COMPREHENSION. I WAS MAD ENOUGH TO CANCEL MY SUBSCRIPTION WITH ISSUE ONE. YOU WILL HAVE TO DO BETTER THAN THAT.
GORDON E. JONES MD
OLYMPIA, WASH.

•For Stan Sayresand his Gold Cup see Aug. 23 issue.—Ed.

SIRS:
FROM ONE WHO PLANNED A SIMILAR PROJECT IN '48 YOU MAY BE INTERESTED TO KNOW YOU HAVE GONE WAY BEYOND THE BEST EXPECTATIONS. CONGRATULATIONS.
BILL ROBINSON
ROBINSON-HANNAGAN ASSOCIATED
NEW YORK

SIRS:
THROUGH THE (MILWAUKEE) JOURNAL CITY ROOM AND SPORTS DEPARTMENT I HAVE HEARD MANY UNSOLICITED COMPLIMENTS. CONGRATULATIONS.
ROD VAN EVERY
MILWAUKEE

SIRS:
MY COMMENT BRIEFLY. THIS MAG IS A 'FAN MAKER.'
PAULINE CRENSHAW
EVANSTON, ILL.

SIRS:
CONGRATULATIONS YOUR FIRST ISSUE BEST SPORTS MAGAZINE EVER SEEN. KEEP IT UP. PERK PURNHAGE
CLINTON BASEBALL CLUB
CLINTON, IOWA

SIRS:
YOU HAVE HIT THE BULLS EYE. SAY HEY.
PAUL H. HELMS
CHAIRMAN HELMS ATHLETIC FOUNDATION
LOS ANGELES

SIRS:
DELIGHTED WITH YOUR BABY.
A. M. BEITLER
PHILADELPHIA

SIRS:
HERE IS ANOTHER SNOW FLAKE FOR THE SUBSCRIPTIONS ARE NO DOUBT DROPPING IN ON YOU LIKE SNOWFLAKES. THE FIRST ISSUE IS GREAT.
REX B. YEAGER WEST
WEST LOS ANGELES

SIRS:
CONGRATULATIONS ON SPORTS ILLUSTRATED. BEYOND ALL EXPECTATIONS, IT FULFILLS A DEFINITE NEED FOR THIS GREATEST SPORTS ERA IN HISTORY. YOU HAVE A WINNER.
GORDON LEVOY
HOLLYWOOD, CALIF.

SIRS:
YOUR FIRST ISSUE IS WONDERFUL. IF YOU DON'T WATCH OUT YOU WILL MAKE SPORTS FANS OUT OF PEOPLE WHO SIMPLY LIKE TO READ.
DAVE HULBURD
SAN FRANCISCO

SIRS:
THE NEW MAGAZINE IS THE FIRST TO OFFER EDUCATION AND INSPIRATION IN THE IMPORTANT REALM OF SPORTS, WITH A PICTORIAL EMPHASIS WHICH IS THOROUGHLY
DESERVED. GEORGE W. MEAD
WISCONSIN RAPIDS, WIS.

SIRS:
CONGRATULATIONS ON SPORTS ILLUSTRATED. EXCELLENT RECEPTION HERE.
GEORGE ALLEN
FOOTBALL COACH
WHITTIER COLLEGE
WHITTIER, CALIF.

SIRS:
IT'S A WONDERFUL ISSUE AND MAKES THE BOOK SOMETHING TO LOOK FORWARD TO. CONGRATULATIONS.
NUNNALLY JOHNSON
BEVERLY HILLS, CALIF.

WHAT, NO ARCHERY?

Sirs:
I'd like to call to your attention the fact that archery is one of the fastest growing sports in the country at the present time.
HOWARD L. CHASE
Salisbury Broadcasting Corp.
Worcester

•Archery, yes. See next week.—ED.

Sirs:
There are two sports which I hope you are planning articles on for future issues-camping and spelunking.
A. C. MUELLER JR.
Scotch Plains, N.J.

•Coming up.—ED.

Sirs:
I was extremely pleased but there was one rather serious omission. Rodeo is a major sport.
(REV.) JOHN W. MEYER, C.S.B.
University of St. Thomas
Houston

•Watch for Hy Peskin's great rodeo coverage.—ED.

Sirs:
The debut of Sports Illustrated interests me for more than one reason. There's always a chance that some brave soul may take the right stand on what is now called wrestling.

If that enterprise has any claim to respectability it should be covered by a publication devoted exclusively to sports, but if it is a billion dollar racket, as claimed in many quarters, the new magazine should fight it.

Many popular wise guys take the very unethical position that as the fans are not compelled to support the hippodromes there is no harm in the promotion of the fraudulent thing by various states and cities-for a share of the take.
E. W. Springer
R.F.D. 1
Trevor, Wisconsin

•SI will be brave.—ED.

Sirs:
One thing I noticed is that under the heading "Scoreboard," polo has been omitted. I was wondering if you think that this should be included. We would like to have it included.
T. A. MOHLMAN
Oak Brook Polo Club
Hinsdale, Illinois

•Okay, polo will be listed.—ED.

Sirs:
S O C C E R! No American magazine has paid sufficient attention to it! Please, what do you say?
ALBERT W. FISCHER AND FRIENDS
Berkeley, Calif.

Sirs:
I understand it is the intention to include all sports and therefore suggest that you include "CURLING," the greatest social game of all time.
H. E. WEYMAN
Quebec, Canada

Sirs:
I did not see a single bowling story.
MORT LUBY
Publisher
The National Bowlers Journal and Billiard Review
Chicago

•See p. 77.—ED.

Sirs:
Please see that the sport of track comes in for its share of write ups.
Baltimore
WILLIAM JIMESON
President
Baltimore Olympic Club

•See p. 6.—ED.

Sirs:
I am naturally more interested in skiing than any other sport.
ROGER LANGLEY
Executive Secretary
National Ski Association of America

Sirs:
We have only one criticism. We think your magazine lacks coverage for lesser sports such as horseshoes, archery, badminton, fishing.
JOHN STARRETT
Boys' Club of Knoxville Inc.
Knoxville

Sirs:
I am hopeful that sometime in the future you might see fit to cover, in some way, the story of the amazing growth of employee recreation.
A. H. SPINNER
Supervisor of Employee Activities
Armstrong Cork Company
Lancaster, Pa.

FOR DEAR OLD RUTGERS

Sirs:
Congratulations on your new magazine, SPORTS ILLUSTRATED—enjoyed every page! Feeling sure that you would like to give credit where due, I would like to correct Mr. Holland's statement in his article, "The Golden Age Is Now." The boys started "dying for dear old Rutgers" and playing the first intercollegiate football game—Rutgers vs. Princeton—in 1869.
BARBARA SMITH
Secretary, Football Office
Rutgers University
New Brunswick, N.J.

•They may have been dying for dear old Rutgers in that game with Princeton at New Brunswick, N.J., but they were playing soccer.—ED.

MEMORIES FLOODING BACK

Sirs:
Your first issue fairly took my breath away! It gave me only one regret. My father, W. J. Grube, never got to see it.

He would have loved your art on artist George Bellows. At the turn of the century my father knew and admired George Bellows very much. Dad, George, and a third young and impoverished lad from Ohio, Paul Richmond, were all in New York City together trying to win their way to fame and fortune.

Pop and Bellows were both serious art students at Chase Art Institute and were members of the old Art Students' League. Occasionally, my father would reminisce a little about his New York City student and newspaper days.

One little anecdote he often told of the puckish Bellows, a hell of an athlete in his own right, man-about-town, and a performer as graceful as Napoleon Lajoie, according to dad, around second base, comes to mind which George pulled on dad and Richmond once.

It seems that while strolling down Broadway one day they (all three of them) happened to pass right by a gorgeous dish ambling along in the opposite direction. "Gosh!" my dad would sigh, "but she was beautiful," the perfect model for the "Gibson Girl!"

Then Bellows said, "How would you like to see that in her birthday suit?" Pop remembers that one of them remarked, "you mean in the altogether?" "That's just what I mean," reiterated Bellows. "I can fix it up!" Dad says that he and his Prospect friend looked incredulously back and forth sure that their leg was being pulled until Dad finally spoke up, "Well I'm game! but I think you're bluffing." Richmond agreed he was game too and a date was made for the following Friday to meet on a nearby corner to see the fair Diana

At that time Bellows showed up, led them across the street and down a dark and dingy side street. There he turned into an even darker alley which wound around a corner to an old three-story loft. They entered this building and went up a rickety flight of stairs to the second floor. Here Bellows dramatically flung back two wide doors saying "There! she is!" leaving two blushing and foolish-feeling fellow Ohioans standing staring at the "dish," while a roomful of earnest young men and women looked up from their busy sketching long enough to give my dad and Paul Richmond, the merry ha! ha! The gal was there all right. She was a professional model and Bellows, who knew it all the time, had quite a bit of fun at my parent's expense. I rather gathered that this was not exactly what the duo had in mind.

A lot of these memories came flooding back to me when I saw some of the stuff George Bellows had painted...
DAVE GRUBE
Delaware, Ohio

THE GREAT PROFILES

Sirs:
Have you started with a "boo-boo"? Or could it be that the young upstart of Time Inc. reported correctly when it stated that weight lifter Doug Hepburn was "handicapped since childhood with a shrunken left leg," whereas its older and more experienced brother Life (August 16th issue) said it was a "withered right leg"?
F. J. MARIN
Winona, Minn.

•Life, older and more experienced, was right. What's more, SI mistook Dave Bailey for Doug Hepburn (see cuts).—ED.

Sirs:
Congratulations! Time Inc. gets credit for another first in the field of journalism.

However, I am forced to call a "foul." James Naismith was an instructor at the International YMCA College (Springfield, Mass.), now officially known as Springfield College, when he devised the game of basketball to provide an active type of exercise to supplement the formal gymnastic program and not the physical director at the Springfield, Mass. YMCA.

As a graduate of Springfield College 1949, I have more than a passing interest in bringing the editors of Sports Illustrated up to date on their facts.
CHARLES R. JONES
Associate Physical Director
Springfield Young Men's
Christian Association
Springfield, Mass.

Sirs:
On page 84 you say that James A. Nai-smith's invention of basketball was "the only game purely American in its origin." Canadians may take exception of this since—although the game was invented in the U.S.—Dr. Naismith was a Canadian, born at Almonte, near Canada's capital city.
OWEN G. GRANT
Ottawa, Ontario

•All praise to Canada.—ED.

LADLE RAT ROTTEN HUT

Sirs:
Weave scene spores ill U.S. straight Eden lichen moron weekend worst fur.

Pick shores, riding, layette eggshell aunt. Sir queue lay shun Serutan clime rafter wonder too moor is youse lake diction.
Congress elations!
Sin yearly,
FRANC END AILING WHALE TUN
New York

Sirs:
Corn graduations onager furs tissue. Weal lobe dit!

Eft err necks tissues arras gut aster furs, yonder nor zircon stances willy mizzen additions!
MR. and MRS. CHARLES W. WELLS
Sacramento, Calif.

Sirs:
Eyeglasses arrows dew warts inure sorry bout Ladle Rat Rotten Hut; mainly "window" and "and." Hazard spoof-pleader slep top?
Since eerily,
RICHARD E. JENKS
Ridgewood, N.J.

•Co-wrecked, spoof-pleader slept top. Shoulder raid "widow" ant "ant."—HEAD.

Sirs:
SPORTS ILLUSTRATED is swell! We especially enjoyed the stories "The Baseball Bubble Trouble" and "Anybody Got a Solly Hemus?"

We have been collecting baseball cards for over 2 yrs. and now have 1,480 cards including duplicates and as many as 5 & 6 different type cards of some players.

We are enclosing a Solly Hemus card for the Weidman boys. Do they have a Johnny Antonelli they could send us? Does anyone have a Johnny Antonelli?
GARRY GILLESPIE
GEORGE GILLESPIE
AGED 10 & 11
Brockport, N.Y.

•Johnny Antonelli is on the way to Garry and George and Solly Hemus is on the way to the Weidman Boys in an even swap.—ED.

HANDCLASPS FOR BABY

PUBLIC SERVANTS

Sirs:
In a way I am sorry you are putting it out because there is so little time down here and I am sure I am going to read every issue with pleasure and interest.
STUART SYMINGTON
United States Senate

Sirs:
I am delighted to have this "new baby" because I think I was in at the births of the first, second and third "babies."
HENRY CABOT LODGE JR.
United Nations

•Ambassador Lodge was Time's first Washington correspondent circa 1926.—ED.

Sirs:
I thoroughly enjoyed the first issue, especially those pieces on fishing. I am looking forward to issues that will, I am sure, deal with my other favorite sport, hunting.

The philosophy of the magazine is well stated in the piece on the "New Golden Age," where the writer says that "Far from being a dream world, the world of sport, booming as it is everywhere, may be keeping another world from blowing its top, literally and figuratively."
HAROLD STASSEN
Foreign Operations Administration

Sirs:
Congratulations. It is off to a fast start.
ALBERT E. COBO Mayor
Detroit

Sirs:
...As one interested in practically every sport, I greatly enjoyed reading it and compliment you on its contents and makeup.
FRANK CARLSON
United States Senate

Sirs:
It is my sincere belief that your magazine will be well received by the leaders in the world of sport.
THOMAS C. HENNINGS JR.
United States Senate

Sirs:
Congratulations on the new offspring!
OVETA CULP HOBBY
Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare

Sirs:
The reason I know I will enjoy it is that my 18-year-old son, John, was one of your prepublication subscribers and he has been devouring this first issue with immense enthusiasm. I hope it goes on to the great success which seems to be assured.
THOMAS E. DEWEY
Governor
Albany, N.Y.

Sirs:
It's outstanding.
WARREN G. MAGNUSON
United States Senate
Washington, D.C.

INDUSTRIALISTS

Sirs:
As one who has followed sports closely through the years and has actually seen a great many of the events that are so well photographed in this first issue, it brought back many vivid recollections. I was especially impressed with what I would call the "change of pace," as well as the comprehensiveness and breadth of coverage. It is bound to be of interest to the millions of Americans who are interested in sports of all kinds. Your first issue is so good that I think your staff will have lots of trouble maintaining the high standard it has set. But then, those of us who are confirmed readers of Time, Fortune and Life have discovered that your organization has what it takes.

Congratulations to you and your associates on this outstanding first issue of SPORTS ILLUSTRATED.
BERNARD F. GIMBEL
Chairman of the Board
Gimbel Brothers, Inc.
New York

Sirs:
We had seven guests over the weekend at Madison, Conn., five arrived with a copy of the first issue of Sports Illustrated.
GROVER A. WHALEN
Chairman of the Board Coty, Inc.
New York

Sirs:
My family and I think it is great.
J. CAMERON THOMSON
President
Northwest Bancorporation
Minneapolis

Sirs:
I take this opportunity to congratulate you on launching this unique magazine.
K. S. ADAMS
Chairman
Phillips Petroleum Company
Bartlesville, Okla.

Sirs:
As a broken down athlete in the areas of golf, tennis, baseball, swimming, fishing, shooting, skiing and jumping the hunters, I will be glad to record and send you any pearls of wisdom I accumulate.
LEMUEL R. BOULWARE
Vice President
General Electric Company

Sirs:
A quick look through indicates that you have done it again and have quite a magazine here.
DON G. MITCHELL
Chairman of the Board
Sylvania Electric Products, Inc.

Sirs:
I think it is an excellent magazine and I am already looking forward to reading future issues.
J. P. LEVIS
Chairman Board of Directors
Owens-Illinois Glass Company
Toledo, Ohio

Sirs:
The first issue is excellent. I suppose it goes without saying that I was carried away with Granny Rice's "last" piece—"Golf's Greatest Putt."
R. W. WOODRUFF
Atlanta

Sirs:
You are away to an excellent start.
HAROLD BOESCHENSTEIN
President
Owens Corning Fiberglas Corporation
Toledo, Ohio

Sirs:
"It is a honey."
CHARLES EDISON
New York

Sirs:
There's so much good material in it I know my son and I will spend hours poring through it.
C. G. MORTIMER
President
General Foods Corporation
White Plains, N.Y.

Sirs:
My congratulations on a remarkable accomplishment.
LORING L. GELBACH
President
Central National Bank of Cleveland
Cleveland

THE ARTS

Sirs:
I had a heck of a time keeping my kids from grabbing all the pictures of the ballplayers. My wife, in particular, liked the piece on bubble gum by Jerome Weidman, because we are going through our own private Battle of the Bubble at home.
JERRY WALD
Columbia Pictures Corporation
Hollywood

Sirs:
I have just seen the first issue of Sports Illustrated and I hasten to congratulate you on a splendid job, magnificently done. The magazine far exceeds, in every respect, anything I thought possible in the field of sports.
SAMUEL GOLDWYN
Los Angeles

Sirs:
Congratulations. If you can keep up the exciting interest and the powerful appeal of that first issue, the magazine can't fail.
JOHN GOLDEN
St, James Theatre
New York

Sirs:
The new magazine is a honey. Good writing, high readability, illustrations pat and highspot.
CARL SANDBURG
Flat Rock, N.C.

Sirs:
It's a magnificent job. Congratulations and best wishes.
DIGGORY VENN
Associate Director
The Institute of Contemporary Art
Boston

EDUCATORS & CLERGYMEN

Sirs:
The first issue is the nearest thing I have to a Gutenberg Bible.
The text is as good as the pictures. It seems to be in the tradition of John Kieran and Arthur Daley—free from dumb jargon
REV. ROBERT I. GANNON, S.J.
St. Ignatius Loyola Residence
New York

Sirs:
SPORTS ILLUSTRATED is superb. It is more than "Sports Illustrated." It is "Sports Illuminated," for it lights up with new interest and deeper significance and richer meaning one of the great and growing areas in our world today.
HAROLD R. ELY, D.D.
Mt. Washington Baptist Church
Cincinnati

Sirs:
If the aim of a democratic society is to bring out the best in the individual, physically, mentally and spiritually, Sports Illustrated supplies a definite medium to that end. At a time when the newsstands are loaded with publications ranging from commercialized filth to the glorification of the moron, this new periodical comes like a breath of fresh, clear air.
REV. REDMOND A. BURKE, C.S.V.
Director of Libraries
De Paul University
Chicago

Sirs:
I believe SPORTS ILLUSTRATED will be of great service to American youth and to the American public.
JAMES W. LAURIE
President
Trinity University
San Antonio, Texas

Sirs:
It looks like a winner.
ROBERT L. JOHNSON
President
Temple University
Philadelphia

Sirs:
I have no suggestion other than to urge that future issues maintain the interest and standard of the first.
WALTER CONSUELO LANGSAM
President
Gettysburg College
Gettysburg, Pa.

Sirs:
The thing that interested me was the large number of young men AND women who were waiting for the first copy to arrive. They had read about it and heard about it—and were really anxious to see it. I spoke to several of them and they think it is "HOT" and so do I.
JOHN G. MOORE
General Secretary
The Young Men's Christian Association
Norfolk, Neb.

Sirs:
It is much better than I had hoped for.
REV. DAVID A. WORKS
Christ Church
North Conway, N.H.

THE PRESS

Sirs:
I acquired a copy as soon as it appeared on the newsstands and have already told my office to secure it for me regularly.
ARTHUR HAYS SULZBERGER
Publisher
New York Times

Sirs:
What hit me hardest was your intuitive or deliberate emphasis on the basic emotions or primary passions that cut across all games, sports, pastimes and hobbies—concentrating on the "constants" like courage, character, competition and camaraderie.
M. LINCOLN SCHUSTER
Simon & Schuster
New York

Sirs:
I think the first issue is a knock-out!
F. F. FITZPATRICK
Publisher
The Salt Lake Tribune
Salt Lake City

Sirs:
When the new sports weekly was in the planning state, I was frankly skeptical. Volume 1, Number 1 has made a convert, out of me. It's a magnificent job.
MARSHALL FIELD JR.
Editor and Publisher
Chicago Sun-Times
Chicago

Sirs:
What impressed me most was the completeness of this first issue. It is as though you had been publishing it for years.
FRANK D. SCHROTH
Brooklyn Eagle
Brooklyn, N.Y.

Sirs:
Allow me to congratulate you.
RALPH MCGILL
Editor, Atlanta Constitution
Atlanta

Sirs:
It should be a great success and certainly will be. Its beautiful and well-chosen illustrations create intense interest and overflow with pictorial information which delight especially those who know and enjoy sports. Its articles on the chosen subjects impart to those interested in sports a great deal of information. Typographically your initial issue is excellent.
F. A. MILLER
President and Editor
The South Bend Tribune
South Bend

Sirs:
I have read and enjoyed the first issue. From the combined viewpoint of a fan and onetime sports editor, I think it is a first-rate job and strictly off and running on the right track.
ALAN J. GOULD
Executive Editor
The Associated Press
New York

CANCELLATIONS AND DISAPPOINTMENTS

Sirs:
I have received my first copy of Sports Illustrated and wish to cancel my subscription.
WALTER GREENBALT
Dallas, Texas

Sirs:
I just "read" the first issue of SPORTS ILLUSTRATED.

Make-up unimaginative—writing the same! Okay—the pictures of the Marciano fight were good—but that doesn't make a magazine.

You seem to be departmentalized and organized all the sweat, smell, fun and life out of sports.
PHILIP KESSLER
New York

Sirs:
Your first issue disappointed our son. He is an "outboard" enthusiast.
J. D. DRAKE
Jackson, Miss.

Sirs:
The first time I scanned through the magazine I was definitely disappointed. I had thought that there would be more pictures and less reading.

The second time through (sometime later) I began to get the idea of what your plans for the magazine were and my opinion of the first issue went up several points. To sum it up I am not wildly enthusiastic but will "wait and see" what comes up in the next month or so.
H. J. GARY
N. Robinson, O.

Sirs:
The new weekly magazine devoted to the Wonderful World of Sport, certainly pleases me no end, and at the same time it gives me some qualms. Sports are a great business, but along with the business-and this is what ails the world today—one has to consider the wholesome and physical needs of the people. Will your editor point the magazine so that it does good for the people reading it, or is it just a report on sports? Will it make sports desirable from the viewpoint of the individual so that he becomes a participant, or is it like TV where one lazily and effortlessly watches the world go by "without raising a finger to do anything about it?
PAUL Y. JOHNSON
Brooklyn, N.Y.

•The finger will be raised.—ED.

Sirs:
To the diapason of praise which may be engulfing you, may we add a bit of cacophony?

Good were Jemail's hotbox and the "Spectacle" pictures. Just fair was the usually excellent "Red" Smith. As for the rest—naah. Exciting as a 12 to 2 ball game between the Orioles and the Macks.
E. C. BARSDALE
G. B. HENDERSON
Arlington, Texas

Sirs:
Frankly, I'm a little disappointed. You devoted far more space to background and build-up than I enjoyed reading. Not enough of the up-to-the-minute stuff. Another thing, I'd like to see more pictures, although those you did publish were superb.
JOHN CHOHLIS
San Gabriel, Calif.

Sirs:
How do you justify a boomerang in a section called Under 21? Only big wheel boomerang man I ever heard of was Wallace and who hears of him?
CLINT BOLTON
New Orleans

Sirs:
I examined and read your first edition from cover to cover. I wish that I could say "congratulations" but unfortunately, I would be less than frank if I did not say that I was very much disappointed.

With the exception of Mark Kauffman's three color shots of the Marciano-Charles fight and George Bellows' three splendid paintings, I found very few of the illustrations capturing "the instants of dramatic excitement, of human and animal grace, of victory and defeat, that are what sport is made of."
C. J. PELLETIER
New York

Sirs:
On page 122 of your first issue you published a picture of "a portrait of the Horse of the Year." This reproduction was made from a photograph sent to you by our office with a caption that Tom Fool was voted Horse of the Year by The Morning Telegraph and Daily Racing Form and these publications were making the presentation to the owners of Greentree Stable.
J. SAMUEL PERLMAN
Editor and Publisher
Triangle Publications, Inc.
New York

•SI apologizes for leaving out the newsworthy facts.—ED.

Sirs:
I read your first issue with an open mind.
Having read it, I put on my shoes and dropped into my favorite bar to discuss its merits with others in the advertising and writing world.

The consensus of opinion was that the martinis were too dry, the manhattans too sweet, the beer too warm and the magazine on a level three times removed from the bleachers and one from the box seats.

Don't take your monumental work so darned seriously. Mr. Baruch can belabor labor, but you can't belabor the sports fans. They are fans because sports are entertainment, fun escape, hobbies and sheer unadulterated enjoyment.
WALTER P. DEERING
Miami, Fla.

Sirs:
I did note two minor errors in the first issue, both of them having to do with harness racing. Under a photograph of Mrs. E. R. Harriman driving Tassel Hanover, you state that she is "bettering the world half-mile mark which she set two years ago with the same horse as a three-year old." Actually, I believe that Tassel Hanover was a three-year old in 1950 during which year she set the half-mile track record for pacing three-year old fillies at 2:02.2.

On page 143 in the last paragraph, you refer to the earnings of Proximity but the adjectives used belie the fact that she is actually a mare. This point is of no great significance except that it is interesting that The Maid's unique performance was first surpassed by another mare.
RICHARD HELMS
Chevy Chase, Md.

•Reader Helms is right on both counts.—ED.

Sirs:
On pages 22 and 32 reference is made to the fact that "Jackie" MacDonald was "barred" and "suspended" from competition in the British Empire and Commonwealth Games.

Following the submission of evidence after the games the General Session of the A.A.U. of Canada completely absolved Miss MacDonald of all blame and stated her status as an amateur was unimpaired.
Might I congratulate you very much on your coverage both in pictures and in text, particularly the "Miracle Mile."
HAROLD E. M. BRADSHAW
Vancouver, Canada

•Jackie MacDonald is welcomed back to the Amateur ranks.—ED.

Sirs:
May I suggest that you perhaps should take the opportunity to use pictures and articles on outstanding events for women. By this I mean the type which stresses femininity as well as skill (not the women wrestlers).

Perhaps you happened to see my North High Rope Jumpers last year. They are nationally known. The group changes from year to year as girls graduate.
THERESA ANDERSON
Director of Physical Education
North High School

Sirs:
I was disappointed in "Sporting Look" giving only pictures of clothing. There was just a part of a picture of Jim Kimberly's car. Is this a sports magazine or a Fashion Guide?

On August 8 at the Lockbourne Air Force Base were races that were not covered.

Now let's see how you cover the following before I cancel my subscription:

Aug. 14 Dutch Grand Prix, Holland.

Aug. 15 National Hillclimb, Mt. Washington, N.H.

Aug. 15 International Race, Pescara, Italy.

Aug. 29 1000 Km Race, Nurburgring, Germany.

Sept. 4/5 Thompson Raceway, Thompson, Conn.

Sept 5 Italian Grand Prix, Monza, Italy.

Sept. 18/19 Watkins Glen, N.Y. The above are but a few that I could have listed.

There is enough going on, lots of variety—how about a department with a columnist on the subject.
Detroit
JACK M. THORPE

•John Bentley, who wrote about the Lockbourne meet in the second issue, will do his best.—ED.

Sirs:
Who do you think you're kidding?

The Bannister-Landy story was a good one, but most of the rest of the stuff seemed a blend of arnica and dry Martini, not exactly tasteful nor tasty.

I am disappointed in you, fellows. But not too much. When I heard the real punchy, imaginative title you had selected for your new experiment, I rather suspected that a good idea had gone sour somewhere along the line. Frankly, boys, it looks to me as if you've pulled a big rock."
JOHN D. MCKEE
Albuquerque, N.Mex.

Sirs:
With fifty million cars on the American highways and thousands of sports cars being sold annually why paint the sport as one belonging to the wealthy eccentrics. Perhaps SPORTS ILLUSTRATED should go up to Watkins Glen and listen to the Jaguar, Porsche and Austin-Healey owners bargain with local home owners about the charge for an overnight room. Blue jeans, tee shirts and mechanics' coveralls are the usual attire before, during and after a race meet among those who drive for the sport—and not to make headlines.

I've been racing sports cars and motorcycles for twenty years, I have participated in Europe, here in the U.S. and have been in two Pan American Road Races in Mexico—call me if I can be of any help. I like the start you have made.
WALTER K. VON SCHONFELD

Sirs:
Last evening the big moment had arrived. Thank God, my son is still in camp because had he been there I am not too sure that the magazine would not have found its way through one of our windows.
A. HERMAN LYNCH
Scarsdale, N.Y.

Sir:
You asked for comment. Anything detrimental said would be like knocking the newborn to its bug-eyed pop. But here goes. Your magazine shaped up as a darned good try. Writing: slick and concise. Contents: varied and occasionally stimulating and timely.

Overall, however, I thought it missed out. In ranging far to please the entire family, it may have missed the prime target: sports fans. I don't know how much interest in poison ivy, art and sports-car racing fashions is found in a Dodger or White Sox grandstand. The average fan after a long, puzzled look might decide to stick with his radio, newspaper, Sporting News and the Post.

I had hoped SPORTS ILLUSTRATED would fill the big vacuum in "This Wonderful World of Sports." I thought it would provide a respected forum where, after due deliberation, a point of view would be taken. I do not mean controversy for controversy's sake. I mean documented, logical analysis, opinion of the many facets of the sports world.

A case in point is the contemplated Philadelphia A's franchise switch. Do Connie Mack and his sons, as most commentators insist midst much sentimental weeping, deserve sympathy? Have they been good for baseball in Philadelphia? Or, as one bootblack in Philadelphia insisted to me just a few days ago, have they milked the baseball dollar in Philadelphia?
DEAN C. MILLER
Sports Editor
United Press Radio Division

Sirs:
Regarding young golfer age 3, enclosed our golfer, age 14 Y2 months. David looks surprised and no wonder; he seldom misses!
CAPT. WALTER BEINKE
Lawton, Okla.

Sirs:
While the magazine would be of great interest to sports enthusiasts, I'm afraid that our girls ages 7-15 would not find it very exciting.
MARY W. MAYNARD
Executive Director
Niagara Falls Council of Girl Scouts
Niagara Falls, N.Y.

AS THE PROS SEE IT

Sirs:
This magazine presents the sports picture in a unique manner and, in my opinion, should satisfy the demand for the coverage of all sporting events in one publication, that the tremendous number of sports-minded people of this country have been seeking.

May I offer my congratulations to you and your staff and assure you that I am avidly looking forward to the receipt of my next edition?
"HANK" GREENBERG
Cleveland Indians
Cleveland

Sirs:
I have just read through SPORTS ILLUSTRATED from cover to cover and find it most interesting.

Naturally I have a special affection for boxing and I anticipate some intriguing presentations by Budd Schulberg, who can write as few others can.
ABE J. GREENE
Commissioner
National Boxing Association of America
Paterson, N.J.

Sirs:
Your new magazine should mean a lot to all sports in the years to come.
A. J. CONNELL
Augusta Baseball Club
Augusta, Ga.

Sirs:
It is certainly a very interesting publication, and I am sure will be very well received. The articles and pictures are very well done.
GEORGE A. FLETCHER
Philadelphia National League Club
Philadelphia

Sirs:
Boy, I'm really impressed.
KEN MCKENZIE
National Hockey League
Montreal, Canada

Sirs:
You certainly have an A-l publication here and one which will be a great asset in increasing sports in general.
RAYMOND DUMONT
National Baseball Congress
Wichita, Kansas

Sirs:
I read through it with a great deal of interest, and I assure you I have no suggestions as to how it can be improved. It is "tops" in my book. Everything about it has to appeal not only to those in the sports world, but to others as well.
THOMAS A. YAWKEY
President
Boston American League
Baseball Company
Boston

Sirs:
You and your staff are to be congratulated on a job well done and I am looking forward to each succeeding issue.
GABRIEL PAUL
The Cincinnati Baseball Club Co.
Cincinnati

Sirs:
After looking this first issue over, I want to compliment you and your staff for presenting such a fine sports magazine to the public. It certainly covers the activities of all sports in a most complete manner. Keep up the good work!
CLARK C. GRIFFITH
President
Washington American League
Base Ball Club
Washington, D.C.

Sirs:
To use your own words, it is really "exciting." We, who have made amateur forays in the field, find great solace at least in knowing how well these things can be done under optimum auspices.
PETER J. McGOVERN
President
Little League Baseball
Williamsport, Pennsylvania

Sirs:
These are the reactions of a fellow who has written sports in Boston papers for 45 consecutive years. I confess I am a track filbert. What a magnificent job on the incredible collapse of Jim Peters in the British Empire Games Marathon...How pleasing to digest Bill Talbert's forthright tennis chatter...Red Smith, who is tops with everyone, deftly handled Leo the Great...Indeed, it is difficult to fault this new magazine.
GEORGE C. CARENS
Sports Columnist
The Boston Herald Traveler Corporation
Boston

Sirs:
Thanks much for the advance copy of "Sports Illustrated." I took it home last night and gave it a good going over. A fine magazine, something that has been lacking in the sports magazine field for some time. Anytime I can spend an evening with any sort of periodical, it has to be something. Congratulations on a fine job.
GEORGE McKEOWN
Sports Director, WEKZ
Monroe, Wisconsin

Sirs:
It's tough for a play-by-play sports announcer to admit, but your first edition left me speechless. It's the most.
JIM HURLEY
Sports Director, WIKK
Erie, Penn.

Sirs:
Took liberty to quote a bit from your nice issue, as I have been writing some Kansas trotting saga. Will look forward to seeing some more issues. Well got up.
PETE LIGHTNER
Sports Editor
Wichita Eagle
Wichita, Kans.

Sirs:
I was delighted with the first issue, and feel that the book will fill a real need for the layman as well as the professional in the field of sports.
JOHN FULTON
Sports Director, WZXI
Atlanta, Ga.

FROM THE KANSAS CITY STAR

Sporting, Comment
By Ernest Mehl. (The Star's Sports Editor.)

The first issue of Sports Illustrated reached the newsstands last week after many weeks of the most exhaustive preparation and this latest effort by Time, Inc., constitutes a really extraordinary addition to the field of athletics.

The photography is breath-taking and the scope of the material excellent. In this field SPORTS ILLUSTRATED, judging by the first issue, is in a class by itself.

TIME, Inc., hopes to do with this weekly what it has done with its national magazine devoted to stories behind the news. In this issue it offers articles on baseball, hunting and fishing, track, boomerang throwing and golfing.

We were interested particularly in a list of leading spectator sports and the leading participant sports. Softball, with 125 million leads for spectators followed by basketball with 95 million, baseball with 85 million, horse racing with 50 million and football with 35 million.

Of the participant sports fishing is first with 25 million, bowling second with 20 million, hunting third with 15 million, boating fourth with 10 million and golf fifth with 5 million.

Let's hope Sports Illustrated maintains the early pace it has set for itself.

PHOTORUTGERS-PRINCETON GAME PAINTED IN 1932 PHOTOBELLOWS (RIGHT) AS SHORTSTOP THE GREAT PROFILES PHOTOBAILEY PHOTOHEPBURN PHOTODR. NAISMITH WITH FIRST BASKETBALL TEAM ON STEPS OF INTERNATIONAL YMCA COLLEGE, SPRINGFIELD, MASS. ILLUSTRATIONHARRY HARDING. NEW YORK PHOTOWALLACE IN ACTION PHOTOROPE JUMPERS AND ED SULLIVAN PHOTODAVID TWENTY PHOTOS

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)