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THE ELEVEN BEST ELEVENS

Sept. 13, 1954
Sept. 13, 1954

Table of Contents
Sept. 13, 1954

Pat On The Back
  • Herewith a salute from the editors to men and women of all ages who have fairly earned the good opinion of the world of sport, regardless of whether they have yet earned tallest headlines.

Table of Contents
Soundtrack
Spectacle
Fishing
Sporting Look
Under 21
The Big Fight: The Men And Their Muscles
Column Of The Week
  • As the Baltimore Orioles, the former St. Louis Browns are the same old cellar-dwellers. Sports Editor J. Roy Stockton, who knew them in good times and bad, examines their history and the sad lesson of a ball club bled white.

Horse Racing
Boating
Golf
Fisherman's Calendar
Yesterday
  • Over 8,000 people watched America and Ireland vie for the world's rifle championship in a day-long match, unsettled until the final shot

Bowling
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over
Last Laugh

THE ELEVEN BEST ELEVENS

Teams that bloom in the spring often wither by fall. SPORTS ILLUSTRATED'S expert completed his investigation only last week. Here is his up-to-the-minute report on college football

There are eleven men on a football team and there are eleven great football squads in the U.S. I have spent the last several weeks touring this country talking to the experts (see box), and I have picked the ones which you will find on the following pages. They are the greats of Football Fifty-Four, perennial national championship contenders for the most part. I have made no attempt to 1-2-3 them. My 11 Elevens play each other in nine games, and there is plenty of opportunity for throat-cutting.

This is an article from the Sept. 13, 1954 issue Original Layout

A football, in the true words of the old saying, bounces many ways. There may be some teams with better records at the season's end than those I've selected here, and we can spend the winter arguing about them. Many teams are overrated, too. Mississippi, for example, looks like a "shoo in" for the Southeastern Conference title, but is not on my list. Their schedule does not include Georgia Tech, Alabama or any of the top Conference contenders.

I have put Wisconsin, Rice and Iowa in the top bracket. Look at Wisconsin's schedule on the following pages. I'll nominate them right now as the nation's No. 1 team—if they go through that schedule "clean." I've left out Michigan State because the Spartans are starting out practically all over again. Biggie Munn has left the helm for the job of Athletic Director, and seven first-stringers are missing from last season's Rose Bowl champs.

On the West Coast some of the experts think U.C.L.A.'s ineligibility to play a return engagement in the Rose Bowl may cut down their incentive to win. But who wants to get psychological? Their game with mighty Maryland might be the antidote. Oklahoma faces Rose Bowl-hungry California at Berkeley on September 18—we'll see.

Army? Remember, I used to work for Colonel Blaik. If I picked the Cadets, he'd never speak to me again. There has to be a little sentiment in all evaluations; besides, I think Army may still be another year away from greatness. There are several good colleges which are little heard of on the national level. DeWitt Weaver has forged a thunderbolt at Texas Tech. The University of Cincinnati is in the same class. As for Marquette—look out, Wisconsin.

Let's be thankful there are no rules changes this year worth mentioning. Coach and players alike should be better adjusted to working without the Two Platoon system. The players will be faster, the bands louder, the girls prettier. What ho! The sun still shines on the Acropolis and I'm only sixteen years old. PLAY BALL!

U.C.L.A.
LOS ANGELES, CALIF.

HENRY R. SANDERS
COACH

JACK ELLENA
TACKLE

BASIC OFFENSE: Single wing, balanced line.

LETTERMEN RETURNING: 22; STARS: Jack Ellena, T; Jim Salsbury, G; Bob Davenport, F.

LETTERMEN LOST: 15

LEADING SOPHOMORE CANDIDATES: Doug Bradley, H; Bob Bergdahl, Q; Pat Pinkston, E; Jack McKay, C.

1953 RECORD: Won 8, Lost 1. Pacific Coast Conference Champions. Lost to Michigan State in Rose Bowl, 20-28.

1954 SCHEDULE:

Sept. 18—San Diego Navy at home (Night).
Sept. 25—Kansas at Lawrence.
Oct. 1—Maryland at home (Night).
Oct. 9—Washington at Seattle.
Oct. 16—Stanford at home.
Oct. 23—Oregon State at Corvallis.
Oct. 30—California at Berkeley.
Nov. 6—Oregon at home.
Nov. 20—U.S.C. at home.

COACH RED SANDERS SAYS:
We might have as good a team as last year, although I believe every team in the Pacific Coast Conference will probably be better. We expect our line to be as strong as the one that represented U.C.L.A. last fall, in spite of the fact that we lost four starters. And don't forget we also lost the Rose Bowl backfield.

HERMAN HICKMAN SAYS:
The U.C.L.A. teams under the stewardship of Red Sanders have been generally acclaimed by coaches and critics alike for their almost flawless execution of fundamentals. Their single wing balanced line attack and short punt formations, with a few added frills here and there, are unique in today's football. Much detailed attention is paid to all phases of the kicking game and defensive maneuvers. Last season's line was one of the finest in the country. All-American candidates Jack Ellena and Jim Salsbury make the 1954 edition look just as good. Primo Villanueva is expected to fill the big shoes of departed All-American Paul Cameron at the vital tailback position. Not as powerful as Cameron, he is potentially a better passer and a runner with finesse. Bob Davenport may be one of the best running fullbacks in the country. Tip-off to U.C.L.A.'s real strength is the intersectional game with Maryland in Los Angeles on October 1.

DUKE
DURHAM, N.C.

W.D. MURRAY
COACH
JERRY BARGER
QUARTERBACK

BASIC OFFENSE: Split T.

LETTERMEN RETURNING: 19; STARS: Jerry Barger, Q; Worth Lutz, F; Doug Knotts, T; Jesse Birchfield, G; Ralph Torrance, G; Johnny Palmer, C.

LETTERMEN LOST: 13

LEADING SOPHOMORE CANDIDATES: Sonny Jurgensen, Q; Buddy Bass, H; Bunny Blaney, H; Leonard Black, E; Bob Benson, E; Dan Cox, T; Roy Hord, T.

1953 RECORD: Won 7, Lost 2, Tied 1. Atlantic Coast Conference Champions.

1954 SCHEDULE:

Sept. 25—Pennsylvania at Philadelphia.
Oct. 2—Tennessee at home.
Oct. 9—Purdue at Lafayette, Ind.
Oct. 16—Army at home.
Oct. 23—North Carolina State at Raleigh.
Oct. 30—Georgia Tech at home.
Nov. 6—Navy at Norfolk.
Nov. 13—Wake Forest at Wake Forest.
Nov. 20—South Carolina at home.
Nov. 27—North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

COACH BILL MURRAY SAYS:
The total manpower is about the same as last year. The morale of the squad is at a very high level with the boys showing unusually great desire to play. There is a lack of experienced men in both the line and backfield but we look forward to the season with confidence that the boys will do a good job. We may have a fine team if we can get off to a good start but I must point out that that start is against Pennsylvania, Tennessee and Purdue in that order.

HERMAN HICKMAN SAYS:
Duke, long lost in the shadow of mighty Maryland, has been coming fast and in 1953 won the championship in the Atlantic Coast Conference. This may be the best Duke team since the great Wallace Wade days of Parker, Tipton and the McAfees. In spring training Murray shifted Worth Lutz, who has been alternating with Jerry Barger at the split T quarterback position for three years, to fullback. Both Lutz and Barger are fine passers and runners. This combination should make for a versatile attack. Ace in the hole is a slick running sophomore halfback, Bunny Blaney, who is capable of breaking up any ball game. The Army team visits Durham this fall. No southern hospitality is planned.

GEORGIA TECH
ATLANTA, GA.

ROBERT LEE DODD
COACH

LARRY MORRIS
CENTER

BASIC FORMATION: T and Split T

LETTERMEN RETURNING: 25; STARS: Larry Morris, C (1953 consensus All-America); Franklin Brooks, G; Bill Teas, H; Henry Hair, E; Jake Shoemaker, G.

LETTERMEN LOST: 15

LEADING SOPHOMORE CANDIDATES: Paul Rotenberry, H; Dickie Mattison, F; Wade Mitchell, Q; Carl Vereen, T.

1953 RECORD: Won 8, Lost 2, Tied 1. Beat West Va. in Sugar Bowl 42 to 19.

1954 SCHEDULE:

Sept. 18—Tulane at home.
Sept. 25—Florida at home.
Oct. 2—S.M.U. at Dallas (Night).
Oct. 9—L.S.U. at home.
Oct. 16—Auburn at home.
Oct. 23—Kentucky at home.
Oct. 30—Duke at Durham, N.C.
Nov. 6—Tennessee at home.
Nov. 13—Alabama at home.
Nov. 27—Georgia at Athens.

COACH BOBBY DODD SAYS:
We will have a young team in 1954 that should improve as the season progresses. Lack of experience, particularly at tackles and in the backfield, should hurt us most.

HERMAN HICKMAN SAYS:
The team that has won three major bowl games in succession will be just as strong in 1954, despite the statement that lack of experience will hurt them. Coach Dodd has been known in the past as the creator of the "razzle dazzle" type of play in the Southeastern Conference, but in recent years near flawless defensive play has been the mark of Tech teams. There is little reason to believe that Tech will be deficient in either of these abilities. Larry Morris and Franklin Delano Brooks are defensive standouts. Bill Teas, who may be the fastest back in the South, has been Tech's best ground gainer the past two years.

ILLINOIS
CHAMPAIGN-URBANA, ILL

RAY ELIOT
COACH

J.C. CAROLINE
HALFBACK

BASIC OFFENSE: Regular T with flankers

LETTERMEN RETURNING: 14; STARS: J.C. Caroline (Consensus All-American 1953), H; Mickey Bates, F; Jan Smid, G; Don Tate, G.

LETTERMEN LOST: 14

LEADING SOPHOMORE CANDIDATES: Larry Pasko, C; Hiles Stout, Q; Abe Woodson, H.; Percy Oliver, T.

1953 RECORD: Won 7, Lost 1, Tied 1 (Co-Champions Big Ten).

1954 SCHEDULE:

Sept. 25—Penn State at home.
Oct. 2—Stanford at Palo Alto.
Oct. 9—Ohio State at home.
Oct. 16—Minnesota at Minneapolis.
Oct. 23—Syracuse at home.
Oct. 30—Purdue at Lafayette, Ind.
Nov. 6—Michigan at Ann Arbor.
Nov. 13—Wisconsin at home.
Nov. 20—Northwestern at home.

COACH RAY ELIOT SAYS:
Illinois should, with reasonable luck, have a good, sound football team, which will be interesting to watch and a factor in any game on its schedule. Whether we can contend for the Big Ten Championship depends on so many factors which now are question marks in the minds of our coaches, that it's difficult to judge. But, no one ever sells the Fighting Illini short.

HERMAN HICKMAN SAYS:
Illinois was the surprise package of the Big Ten in 1953. Lightly regarded at the outset, the Illini came on to lead their conference in total offense (points scored averaged 25.7 per game) and ranked second defensively. Even though there is inexperience at quarterback, ends, tackles and in line-backing, Illinois is the general favorite to wind up the season on top of the Big Ten heap. The sensational sophomore of 1953, J.C. Caroline, will be joined at the other halfback by Abe Woodson, who could be the sophomore of '54. Last winter Woodson won the Big Ten indoor 70-yard low hurdles championship in :08.0. Mickey Bates, the leading scorer of the team as a sophomore last year, has been moved to fullback. Caroline ranked first in the nation in rushing in 1953 and broke the Illinois record for total offense established by Red Grange in 1923. If no let-down occurs this season, Illinois has the best chance of any Midwest team to go unbeaten.

IOWA
IOWA CITY, IOWA

FOREST EVASHEVSKI
COACH

CALVIN JONES
GUARD

BASIC OFFENSE: Single Wing, unbalanced T and Split T.

LETTERMEN RETURNING: 20; STARS: Calvin Jones, G; George Broeder, F; Frank Gilliam, E; Eddie Vincent, H.

LETTERMEN LOST: 13

LEADING SOPHOMORE CANDIDATES: Ken Ploen, B; Jim Head, F; Ken Meek, E; Don Suchy, C; Bob Elibasich, T.

1953 RECORD: Won 5, Lost 3, Tied 1.

1954 SCHEDULE:

Sept. 25—Michigan State at home.
Oct. 2—Montana at home.
Oct. 9—Michigan at Ann Arbor.
Oct. 16—Ohio State at Columbus.
Oct. 23—Indiana at Bloomington.
Oct. 30—Wisconsin at home.
Nov. 6—Purdue at home.
Nov. 13—Minnesota at Minneapolis.
Nov. 20—Notre Dame at home.

COACH FOREST EVASHEVSKI SAYS:
Undoubtedly Iowa will be overrated, on the basis of our strong 1953 finish. But five key men are gone so this won't be the same team at all. We expect a very good first team but are lacking in line reserves.

HERMAN HICKMAN SAYS:
Optimism never reigned higher at Iowa. Their closing surge last year, including the Notre Dame affair, has produced a flame that hasn't even flickered during the past nine months. Coach Evashevski, Tom Harmon's old blocking back in their Michigan days, has forged a varied offense of single wing, regular T, and split T. Schedule is definitely tough, with seven conference games plus Notre Dame. The opening test with Michigan State should establish the true strength of the 1954 Iowa team.

MARYLAND
COLLEGE PARK, MD.

JAMES M. TATUM
COACH

JOHN IRVINE
CENTER

BASIC FORMATION: Split T.

LETTERMEN RETURNING: 26; STARS: Dick Bielski, F; John Irvine, C; Ronnie Waller, H; George Palahunik, G; Jack Bowersox, G; Bill Walker, E.

LETTERMEN LOST: 9

LEADING SOPHOMORE CANDIDATES: Jack Davis, G; Mike Sandusky, T; Frank Tamburello, Q; Howard Dare, H; Gene Alderton, C; Ed Heuring, G.

1953 RECORD: Won 10. Lost 0. Lost to Oklahoma in Orange Bowl, 0-7.

1954 SCHEDULE:

Sept. 18—Kentucky at Lexington, Ky.
Oct. 1—U.C.L.A. at Los Angeles (Night).
Oct. 9—Wake Forest at Winston-Salem.
Oct. 16—North Carolina at home.
Oct. 22—Miami at Miami, Fla. (Night).
Oct. 30—South Carolina at Columbia, S.C.
Nov. 6—North Carolina State at home.
Nov. 13—Clemson at home.
Nov. 20—George Washington at home.
Nov. 25—Missouri at home.

COACH JIM TATUM SAYS:
The Maryland team will be missing superhuman defensive tackle play which we have had the past six years. Our team will not be as strong defensively because of this and inexperienced defensive secondary play. Therefore we will not have as good a record as last year. Offensively we'll be faster, more passing ability, therefore, should be able to move the ball. Summed up: A better than average college team with the breaks.

HERMAN HICKMAN SAYS:
Maryland has the best chance of any of the 11 teams that I have selected to go undefeated. They were unbeaten in regular season play last year, although they were decisively defeated by the University of Oklahoma in the Orange Bowl, and I can see only one team on their schedule giving them a stern test. That team is U.C.L.A., which they meet in a Friday night game in the Los Angeles Coliseum on Oct. 1. It's a shame that they do not meet the other powerhouse in the Atlantic Coast Conference, Duke University. Under the tutelage of Jim Tatum, Maryland will always be a well-coached, well-balanced and superbly equipped squad. Co-captains Dick Bielski at fullback and center John Irvine are two of the finest football players in the country.

NOTRE DAME
SOUTH BEND, IND.

TERENCE BRENNAN
COACH

RALPH GUGLIELMI
QUARTERBACK

BASIC FORMATION: T and split T.

LETTERMEN RETURNING: 17; STARS: Ralph Guglielmi, Q; Joe Heap, H; Frank Varrichione, T; Ray Lemek, G.

LETTERMEN LOST: 16

LEADING SOPHOMORE CANDIDATES: Paul Hornung, Q; Jim Morse, H; Byron Beams, T.

1953 RECORD: Won 9, Lost 0, Tied 1.

1954 SCHEDULE:

Sept 25—Texas at home.
Oct. 2—Purdue at home.
Oct. 9—Pittsburgh at Pittsburgh.
Oct. 16—Michigan State at home.
Oct. 30—Navy at Baltimore.
Nov. 6—Pennsylvania at Philadelphia.
Nov. 13—North Carolina at home.
Nov. 20—Iowa at Iowa City.
Nov. 27—U.S.C. at home.
Dec. 4—S.M.U. at Dallas.

COACH TERRY BRENNAN SAYS:
We've lost six regulars from the undefeated 1953 team. Our schedule can certainly be regarded as being as difficult as that which will be attempted by any team in the country. As I've said before, and will say again...we'll do our very best, as Notre Dame men always have in the past and always will in the future.

HERMAN HICKMAN SAYS:
Frankly, it's hard to see how any squad could lose such men as Halfback Johnny Lattner, Fullback Neil Worden, Tackle Art Hunter, Center Jim Schrader and Guard Menil Mavraides and still be a top-ranked team. Each was on some All-American or other. Lattner, Worden and Hunter were first-round Pro draft choices. Schrader was a second-round choice. Mavraides a third. But Notre Dame is not an ordinary football team, it's Notre Dame. Young Terry Brennan is definitely on the spot this fall, but in many ways it's a good spot to be on. This might well be the finest squad in Notre Dame's great football history. Last fall's freshman squad was loaded with talent. Ralph Guglielmi will take his place along with Angelo Bertelli and Johnny Lujack in a brilliant line of Notre Dame quarterbacks. The University of Texas provides a mighty challenge in the opener and Iowa has been planning on this one since the tie of last November. Brennan could lose these two, but don't bet on it. Notre Dame doesn't lose two often.

OKLAHOMA
NORMAN, OKLA.

CHAS. B. WILKINSON
COACH

GENE CALAME
QUARTERBACK

BASIC FORMATION: Split T.

LETTERMEN RETURNING: 19; STARS: Kurt Burris, C; Gene Calame, Q; Max Boydston, E; Carl Allison, E; Don K. Brown, T.

LETTERMEN LOST: 11

LEADING SOPHOMORE CANDIDATES: Tommy Pearson, E; Robert Derrick, H; Byron Searcy, T; Tom McDonald, H.

1953 RECORD: Won 8, Lost 1, Tied 1. Big Seven Champions and beat Maryland in Orange Bowl, 7-0.

1954 SCHEDULE:

Sept. 18—California at Berkeley.
Sept. 25—Texas Christian at home.
Oct. 9—Texas at Dallas.
Oct. 16—Kansas at Lawrence.
Oct. 23—Kansas State at home.
Oct. 30—Colorado at Boulder.
Nov. 6—Iowa State at Ames.
Nov. 13—Missouri at home.
Nov. 20—Nebraska at home.
Nov. 27—Oklahoma A & M at Stillwater.

COACH BUD WILKINSON SAYS:
We lost the heart of our team—last year's strength was in the line. Our success this year will be determined by the progress of our sophomore linemen.

HERMAN HICKMAN SAYS:
Bud's Oklahoma teams have won the Big Seven title six years in a row, have never lost to a conference team and have ranked in the top 10 in the nation every year during that period. This year will be no exception. There have been heavy line losses, but Line Coach Gomer Jones has the happy faculty of replacing them. He has produced nine All-Americans in the past seven seasons. Center Kurt Burris may be the finest center in college football this fall. Max Boydston and Carl Allison, who made Notre Dame's All-Opponents team two years in a row, are All-American caliber. Gene Calame at quarterback is considered by many as the most complete back playing college football today. Oklahoma is a notoriously slow starting team. They must speed up the tempo to get by much-heralded California in their opener on Sept. 18. This game means much to the prestige of Pacific Coast football. California has the incentive and the equipment to win it, but don't sell Oklahoma short. They may start fast. Get them past Texas on Oct. 9 and they may go clean.

RICE INSTITUTE
HOUSTON, TEXAS

JESS NEELY
COACH

DICKY MOEGLE
HALFBACK

BASIC FORMATION: T.

LETTERMEN RETURNING: 13; STARS: Dicky Moegle, H; Kenny Paul, G; Marshall Crawford, E; Mac Taylor, H; Morris Stone, H.

LETTERMEN LOST: 16

LEADING SOPHOMORE CANDIDATES: John Held, E; James Peters, E; Jack Throckmorton, F; Phil Harris, Q.

1953 RECORD: Won 8, Lost 2. Co-Champions Southwest Conference. Beat Alabama in Cotton Bowl, 28-6.

1954 SCHEDULE:

Sept. 18—Florida at home (Night).
Oct. 2—Cornell at home (Night).
Oct. 9—Wisconsin at Madison, Wis.
Oct. 16—S.M.U. at home (Night).
Oct. 23—Texas at home.
Oct. 30—Vanderbilt at home.
Nov. 6—Arkansas at Little Rock.
Nov. 13—Texas A & M at College Station.
Nov. 20—T.C.U. at home.
Nov. 27—Baylor at Waco, Texas.

COACH JESS NEELY SAYS:
Replacing the many fine seniors of last year will be a big problem. But we expect to give a good account of ourselves with good running and improved passing.

HERMAN HICKMAN SAYS:
The team that upset Texas last year and mauled Alabama in the Cotton Bowl on New Year's Day cannot be left off the list of my 11 Elevens. Granting the loss of the wrecking crew of blockers on the 1953 squad, there is still the incredible Dicky Moegle, who averaged 7.3 yards per try as a sophomore and scored three touchdowns in the Cotton Bowl. Backs like Dicky are born. I figure that Jess can manufacture more linemen. The schedule is tough, but Rice should jell into another fine team.

TEXAS
AUSTIN, TEXAS

EDWIN PRICE
COACH

BUCK LANSFORD
TACKLE

BASIC OFFENSE: Split T.

LETTERMEN RETURNING: 22; STARS: Buck Lansford, T; Herbert Gray, T; Billy Quinn, F; Delano Womack, H; Kirby Miller, G; Menan Schriewer, E; Charles Brewer, Q.

LETTERMEN LOST: 12

LEADING SOPHOMORE CANDIDATES: Ben Woodson, G; Morton Moriarty, E.

1953 RECORD: Won 7, Lost 3. Co-Champions Southwest Conference.

1954 SCHEDULE:

Sept. 18—L.S.U. at home.
Sept. 25—Notre Dame at South Bend, Ind.
Oct. 2—Washington State at home.
Oct. 9—Oklahoma at Dallas.
Oct. 16—Arkansas at home.
Oct. 23—Rice at Houston.
Oct. 30—S.M.U. at home.
Nov. 6—Baylor at Waco, Texas.
Nov. 13—T.C.U. at Fort Worth.
Nov. 25—Texas A & M at home.

COACH EDDIE PRICE SAYS:
Our boys made great progress late last year but even greater strides will be needed this fall, when we face L.S.U., Notre Dame, Oklahoma and Rice within the first six weeks.

HERMAN HICKMAN SAYS:
The Longhorns have been selected unanimously as the No. 1 team in the Southwest Conference. They lost only four regulars off their co-champion 1953 team. The linemen are big and fast, the backs are of the 180-pound variety with ability and speed. Lansford, a 220-pound "eat 'em up" tackle, and Fullback Billy Quinn are definite All-America possibilities. Their national rating will be established early in games with Notre Dame and Oklahoma.

WISCONSIN
MADISON, WIS.

IVAN B. WILLIAMSON
COACH

ALAN AMECHE
FULLBACK

BASIC FORMATION: Split T and some single wing.

LETTERMEN RETURNING: 16; STARS: Alan Ameche, F; Jimmy Miller, Q; Ron Locklin, E; Gary Messner, C.

LETTERMEN LOST: 18

LEADING SOPHOMORE CANDIDATES: Jim Gros-Klaus, T; Pat Levenhagen, H; Dave Howard, E; Billy Lowe, H.

1953 RECORD: Won 6, Lost 2, Tied 1.

1954 SCHEDULE:

Sept. 25—Marquette at home.
Oct. 2—Michigan State at East Lansing.
Oct. 9—Rice at home.
Oct. 16—Purdue at home.
Oct. 23—Ohio State at Columbus.
Oct. 30—Iowa at Iowa City.
Nov. 6—Northwestern at home.
Nov. 13—Illinois at Champaign-Urbana.
Nov. 20—Minnesota at home.

COACH IVY WILLIAMSON SAYS:
We expect to be a solid ball club this year sparked by a great fullback in our All-American senior Alan Ameche and a fine quarterback in junior Jimmy Miller. Our main weaknesses are lack of speed at the halfbacks, inexperienced tackles, and green end replacements.

HERMAN HICKMAN SAYS:
The 1954 Wisconsin team has just about the toughest schedule in the country. If they go undefeated I'll vote for them as the number one team. They could lose several games and still be a top-ranking team. Outside of playing all the tough ones in the Big Ten, they open with rugged Marquette and play Rice in an intersectional game. Alan Ameche is without peer in the role of an old-fashioned, block-busting type fullback. Jim Miller, as a sophomore last year, was the leading passer in the conference. He can run, too. Their line is physically equipped to contain most of their opponents. Wisconsin last year handed J.C. Caroline and company of Illinois a 34 to 7 drubbing. Word comes from Madison that Ivy Williamson added the single wing offense to his repertoire this past spring. There is no doubt that this formation will give Jimmy Miller a better chance to make use of his running ability and it certainly should increase the offensive score of Alan Ameche. If both Wisconsin and Illinois are undefeated when they meet on Nov. 13, it could be the game of the year.

PHOTORICHARD MEEKPHOTOHERMAN HICKMANTWENTY FIVE PHOTOS

SO YOU WANT TO BE A FOOTBALL PLAYER...

...you have to be ready for a hard time first. This is about the second week of practice, and it hasn't been much fun so far. In fact, you feel more like a football than a player:

You're up at the crack of dawn, your muscles stiff and sore. You get an hour's skull practice first, with your group coach. If you're a lineman, you meet with the "men," known also as the "lunkheads," or "those big, dumb oxen." You, in turn, refer to the back-field as "the boys," or the "artists."

Morning practice comes next, when your breakfast has digested. Your pants and pads are clammy and cold as you climb into them. Stiff-legged, you trot to the practice field. The first order of business is calisthenics. For psychological reasons they call them "conditioning exercises," but by any name you hate them. Then comes an hour and a half of hitting the sled, blocking dummies, three-on-one drills, tackling, work on assignments. Pound, pound, pound. At the other end of the field the "artists" just seem to be having fun, throwing the ball around....

After a heavy noonday meal there's a lecture by the head coach for the entire squad. You're so sleepy you can't hold your head up—until a hotfoot, applied no doubt by an "artist," wakes you up with a yell. The head coach seems to notice you for the first time.

Back to the dressing room after that, for afternoon practice. Two more hours of fundamentals. Drill, drill, drill. When you're finally dismissed the coach warns that everybody should be in bed by 10:30. That's the most useless speech of the season. By 8 o'clock you're all in the sack, except maybe those dancing girls in the backfield.

Then, suddenly, school starts. Only one practice a day! Next week you open with State. Gone are the aches and pains. Here come the headlines!

HOW HERMAN PICKED 'EM

To gather the material on which he based his choice of the eleven top football squads for 1954, Herman Hickman personally interviewed hundreds of coaches, players and sports writers. His travels took him to every corner of America. Last week, for example, he completed a swing which included Chicago, Denver, Seattle, Los Angeles, Dallas, Atlanta, Jacksonville and many places in between. He sought out not only the great, but also the near-great and those who, without much hope of ever attaining national championship status, gallantly stand up year after year to the best teams in the country. "With ten years of playing and 18 years of coaching behind me," said Hickman, who was an All-American guard at Tennessee, line coach at Army, and head coach at Yale, "I modestly believe that I have my finger on the pulse of U.S. football."

Herman Hickman says: PASTE THESE IN YOUR HAT

•The two-platoon system will be used by many of the better teams this fall. Yes, I've read the rules.

•Attention, Midwest fans: Maybe you've never heard of him, but Murray Warmath, Minnesota's new head coach, might surprise you and win his first three games.

•In three years of high school football at White Plains, N.Y., where he was coached by his father, and as a freshman at Yale last year, Dean Loucks, the promising sophomore quarterback, has never played in a losing game. Tip: he may not this year either.

•Season's best T-formation quarterbacks: Guglielmi of Notre Dame, Larson of California, Calame of Oklahoma, Shaw of Oregon, Barger of Duke and Miller of Wisconsin.

•Season's best single-wing tailbacks: Wade of Tennessee, Flippin of Princeton and Villanueva of U.C.L.A.

•Season's best football players at Negro colleges: Charles Wright, the 6-foot 4-inch, 255-pound end from undefeated (1953) Prairie View, Texas; Elijah Childers, Prairie View's 250-pound tackle; Leo Lewis, Lincoln (Missouri) University's halfback who last year scored 22 touchdowns. The pros know all about them.

•Attention, Illinois opponents: when you shift over to stop halfback J.C. Caroline, who broke all of Red Grange's and Buddy Young's records last year, keep at least one eye on Abe Woodson, the Illinis' other halfback. He's a 6-foot 1-inch, 182-pound sophomore who scored a touchdown for the varsity in his first scrimmage September 4; and he's a fine defensive player too. On second thought, maybe you'd better keep both eyes on him.