Search

THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF SPORT

Sept. 13, 1954
Sept. 13, 1954

Table of Contents
Sept. 13, 1954

Pat On The Back
  • Herewith a salute from the editors to men and women of all ages who have fairly earned the good opinion of the world of sport, regardless of whether they have yet earned tallest headlines.

Table of Contents
Soundtrack
Spectacle
Fishing
Sporting Look
Under 21
The Big Fight: The Men And Their Muscles
Column Of The Week
  • As the Baltimore Orioles, the former St. Louis Browns are the same old cellar-dwellers. Sports Editor J. Roy Stockton, who knew them in good times and bad, examines their history and the sad lesson of a ball club bled white.

Horse Racing
Boating
Golf
Fisherman's Calendar
Yesterday
  • Over 8,000 people watched America and Ireland vie for the world's rifle championship in a day-long match, unsettled until the final shot

Bowling
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over
Last Laugh

THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF SPORT

THE BIG WINNERS

This is an article from the Sept. 13, 1954 issue Original Layout

Doris Hart, 29, and Vic Seixas, 31, were Forest Hills' most experienced runners-up. Miss Hart had been to the National Championship finals five times, Seixas twice, but neither had ever won. Last week in the USLTA Championships at Forest Hills the two old veterans had a new experience. Miss Hart, after being brought perilously close to a sixth defeat, wore down former champion (1947) Louise Brough to win her first National Championship, 6-8, 6-1, 8-6. Seixas, never in serious trouble, neatly disposed of Australian Rex Hartwig, who rarely manages to play his "big" match at the right time, 3-6, 6-2, 6-4, 6-4. The biggest disappointments were Australia's Lewis Hoad and America's Tony Trabert, top-seeded in the tournament, who were put out in the quarter-finals.

THE BIG LOSERS

HOAD WAS OUTPLAYED BY HAMILTON RICHARDSON OF THE U.S.

TRABERT WAS OFF BALANCE BEFORE HARTWIG'S CONSISTENCY

Ted Atkinson stood bareheaded and appreciative before a silver ice bowl presented by officials at Aqueduct after he rode his 3,000th winner. Only three other jockeys—Sir Gordon Richards, Johnny Longden and Eddie Arcaro—have won more races.

Surprise winner of women's high jump at European Games in Bern was Britain's Thelma Hopkins, who defeated Russia's top woman athlete with 5-foot 5¾-inch jump. Russians swept games, however, earning more than twice as many points as runner-up Britain.

Fishermen-cooks Eisenhower and Hoover dropped their trout lines briefly to broil some two-inch-thick steaks on an outdoor grill at Byers-Peak Ranch, near Fraser, Colo., where they spent a fishing holiday.

Dizzy Dean on the mound and Joe DiMaggio at the plate looked like ghosts out of the past during exhibition in Omaha. DiMaggio hit a few Dean pitches but failed to get a homer until a substitute replaced Dizzy.

A RECORD IN THE TAKING: Skin-diver Wally Potts furnished photographers a rare and eerie picture as he grappled underwater with the largest black sea bass taken on the Pacific coast this year. Potts, a member of a San Diego spear-fishing club, the Bottom Scratchers, had to free his line from seaweed three times during a tough three-hour battle with the 401½-pound fish. After firing a slip-point dart into the huge fish, the diver secured his 100-foot nylon line to a paddle board on the surface, then played the bass single-handedly until it was subdued. Two members of the club were with Potts but could not help without disqualifying the record catch. Once ashore, Potts posed happily beside his bass (right). Ironically the old Pacific coast record was a 310-pound bass caught by Jack Prodanovich, whose spear gun Potts was testing when he fired at his record-breaking fish.

TEN PHOTOS