ERNEST HEMINGWAY

The "Lost Generation" novelist has been a lifelong outdoorsman
October 04, 1954

At three, Ernest Miller Hemingway got his first fishing rod, at 10 his first gun. In his 56 years, the novelist has fished from the brooks of Michigan to the mountain torrents of Spain, shot game birds in Idaho and lions in Africa. Nowadays, Hemingway writes, fishes and hunts at his Cuba farm, 10 miles from Havana. His feeling for sport is reflected in all his works, from the drama of the bull ring in Death in the Afternoon (1932) to his compassionate fishing tale, The Old Man and the Sea, which won a Pulitzer Prize last year.

Mediocre boxer in his youth as sparring partner for itinerant fighters, Hemingway bares chestful of hair Critic Max Eastman once charged was false.

A crack shot, Hemingway usually bags his limit. The novelist once faced a charging rhino on safari in Africa, killed it at point-blank range.

Snort at sunrise warms author, a two-fisted drinker, during morning hunt. Hemingway does his hunting and fishing early, claims thin eyelids keep him from sleeping late.

At Pamplona Festival in Spain, Hemingway chats with matador. Bullfights hold a fascination for him. Once he even entered the ring to fight a bull (cynics charge it was a cow), wound up with several broken ribs for his efforts.

PHOTOEQUIPPED WITH OUTSIZE CANE POLE AND CREEL, HEMINGWAY FISHED HORTON'S CREEK IN MICHIGAN AT THE AGE OF SEVEN PHOTOWITH CATCH AT SUN VALLEY IN 1939 FOUR PHOTOS

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)