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19th HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

Nov. 01, 1954
Nov. 01, 1954

Table of Contents
Nov. 1, 1954

Health
  • Playground equipment with built-in disappointments is designed to help in preparing youngsters for "the struggles of maturity"

Pat On The Back
  • Herewith a salute from the editors to men and women of all ages who have fairly earned the good opinion of the world of sport, regardless of whether they have yet earned its tallest headlines

Budd Schulberg
Souped-Up
The Wonderful World Of Sport
Soundtrack
Iron Curtain Race
Cinderella Horse
Sport In Art
Nasrullah And Mr. Fitz
You Should Know
Motor Sports
Sporting Look
Tennis
Acknowledgments
Horse Racing
Fisherman's Calendar
Under 21
Bowling
Yesterday
  • Marathoners Hayes and Dorando of the 1908 Olympics turned pro, ran a series of races and started a fad

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

19th HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

DIRTY FOOTBALL
Sirs:
Otto Graham's article in SI, Oct. 11 should be read by everyone connected with the game of football. My opinion of Mr. Graham as a football player has always been the highest. I am happy to say that my opinion of him as a man now matches that of him as a player of a great sport....

This is an article from the Nov. 1, 1954 issue Original Layout

Just the other night I witnessed exactly the kind of dirty football of which he spoke. It was in a game between the Pittsburgh Steelers and Washington Redskins, and I was very disappointed to see the act committed by an ex-All-American player. I hope he reads your excellent article.

Congratulations on printing an article of such outstanding value to so many.
ROBERT G. LARIMER
Pittsburgh

REFORM FROM WITHIN
Sirs:
I hope your Football Is Getting Too Vicious article by Otto Graham is widely read. It is always good to see the impetus for reform coming from within. Football played according to the rules is as much or more fun to play than any other game. When a player is in danger of being permanently maimed by some hotheaded wild-swinging opponent, he is more likely to turn to other sports. If the present viciousness continues, all skills except elbow, fist and knee swinging will disappear from the game. If that's what is wanted, we might as well have a return of the Roman gladiators. Coaches with integrity, backed by their superiors, can do more to alleviate this viciousness than anyone. Witness Graham's story of Buck Shaw and the 49ers refraining from obvious opportunities to put Graham out of the game.
DUANE M. PETERSON
Miami

EXPERT OPINION
Sirs:
Otto Graham's article has done the football world a service. It has brought to the attention of all concerned an unhealthy situation which definitely exists.

Fans and participants have lined up on either side of the question Otto advances. Those opposed to his article suggest that he has taken an opportunity to air personal grievances. Knowing Otto Graham personally, aside from the fact that we have played with and against each other on many occasions, I feel that he has the true interests of football at heart in his article. He has been playing championship football long enough to know the difference between clean, hard playing and that type of unnecessary contact which he described.

Thought-provoking articles such as Otto's are a big step toward remedying the few ills which are still in sports. It is mostly a mental problem. All players are physically capable of intentionally committing unnecessary fouls which maim others, but fortunately not all have it in their minds and hearts to do so.

Otto Graham wouldn't have football any other way than rough and tough. He has given and taken much of the same.

As a player, I appreciate his remarks.
KYLE ROTE
New York

•Kyle Rote, a former Southern Methodist Ail-American, now plays halfback for New York's Professional Football Giants.—ED.

REFRESH YOUR MEMORY
Sirs:
In one of the strange coincidences of sport, about the time you ran a picture of Pop Warner and Jim Thorpe with Marathoner Louis Tewanima in SI, Sept. 27, a search was going on in Arizona for that same Tewanima because of the Olympic Games dinner in New York October 12th.

A Phoenix radio announcer, Bill Close, finally located Tewanima in the Hopi village of Shungopovi, some 300 air miles northwest of here. Tewanima, who had been second in the Olympic 10,000 meters in both 1908 and 1912, had left Carlisle and civilization and had lived as a quiet sheep-herder in his native reservation the past 40 years.

When the request came to get him to New York, we were also trying to find Simon Gillis, an Olympic hammer thrower from the same teams of 1908 and 1912....

Consequently, when the resurrected Redman came through Phoenix this weekend on his way to New York, we got Gillis, who lives in Phoenix, and Tewanima together. This picture (which shows them chuckling over SI's picture which I had used to refresh Gillis' memory on the way to the rendezvous) was the result....

BEN FOOTE
Sports Department
The Phoenix Gazette
Phoenix, Ariz.

SI'S UNLIMITED FACILITIES
Sirs:
In SI's Oct. 11 article, The Boats Have Their Day, Mr. Robert N. Bavier Jr. says that the Class A Scow's smaller sister, an E Scow, won the elapsed-time prize in the "One-of-a-Kind" Series, but he neglects to give the name of the E Scow, where she came from, or who sailed her. I have an un-suppressible feeling that I might know the skipper and the boat, as I have sailed in these boats on Barnegat Bay, New Jersey and participated in one of the class's national regattas. If SI has any facilities for answering letters such as this, I would appreciate knowing the name of the skipper, the name of the boat, where it comes from, and, if possible, the complete standings of all the boats which participated.
EDGAR P. E. WHITE
Prospect, Ky.

•The E Scow, White Heat, built by the Melges Boat Works of Zenda, Wis., was skippered by owner Harry Melges. Herewith the complete results:

View this article in the original magazine

—ED.

ANCHORS AWEIGH
Sirs:
I am thoroughly enjoying my SI each week, from cover to cover. I congratulate you on your excellent and unique publication.

I liked The Bands Play On in SI, Oct. 11, but why did the author omit that famous Navy "Anchors Aweigh"? I am taking the liberty of telling you a little about this classic.

It was composed in 1906 by Prof. Charles A. Zimmerman, musical director, U.S. Naval Academy, bandleader of the Naval Academy band, and was dedicated to the class of 1907 (my class). The words were written by Captain A. H. Miles, U.S.N. (Ret.), who was then a midshipman in my class....

It was customary in my day at Annapolis for Prof. Zimmerman to compose a march for each class, which made its debut at the June Ball—only the members of the class were permitted to dance when it was first played. Most of these class marches "died on the vine." But "Anchors Aweigh" was outstanding—we turned it into a long-needed football song, took it to Philadelphia for the Army-Navy game, and to its inspiring tune we beat the Army for the first time in four years.

Then came the famous world cruise of the Great White Fleet, conceived by President Theodore Roosevelt, who had built our Navy up. We took "Anchors Aweigh" around the world with us on this history-making cruise—it was the favorite marching music wherever the men of the fleet paraded—Rio de Janeiro, San Francisco, Honolulu, Auckland, Sydney and Melbourne. By the time we had circled the globe, "Anchors Aweigh" had become a world-wide favorite. We marched to it in the inaugural parade of President William H. Taft upon our return in 1909, and it has been one of the theme pieces in all naval parades since.

President Franklin D. Roosevelt once told me that "Anchors Aweigh" was his favorite marching song....
CAPTAIN N. L. NICHOLS, USN (RET.)
Baltimore

I GASP IN WONDER
Sirs:
Associate Editor Martin Kane is ill informed: in SI's October 11th article entitled The Bands Play On ... his reference to a song called Georgia Tech's tender "My Yellow Jacket Girl" makes me gasp in wonder. Where did he dig up this thing? I have never heard of it, though I spent five years (1949 to 1954, B.S. and M.S. in electrical engineering) at Georgia Tech. During this period I was a member of Georgia Tech's band, served as band captain and student conductor for two years, played with the band at all home games, various away games, and three New Year's Day games (1952, 1953, 1954) and still never have heard of a song called "My Yellow Jacket Girl."

Inaccurate articles like this one make me wonder how many of the other articles in the various issues of SI are intelligently written on a factual base....
EARL L. LAUBBR
Morristown, N.J.

•SI is surprised that Lauber took his band duties so lightly as to overlook the words, by Daisy Chotas '30, and music, by brother Nick '32, of this home-grown song (see cut). Nick Chotas, now an instructor at the University of Florida's School of Architecture, wrote the song for a football rally and it became a popular number for games and dances. It has, regrettably, not been heard recently. Composer Chotas enjoyed it last in 1936 when played by Ted Weems' band in Washington. Chotas, who someday hopes to write the great American light opera, says: "It was a nice, pretty song, but I never got anything out of it."—ED.

WORDS AND MUSIC
Sirs:
While reading SI, Oct. 11, we noticed in the article The Bands Play On a song for Georgia Tech, "My Yellow Jacket Girl." The five of us have been here a total of sixteen years and by some quirk of fate, we have missed this tune. Would you be so kind as to send us the words and music if possible so that we may start this ballad again on our campus?
JIMMY POWERS '55
JULIAN WADE '54
BOBBY BASS '55
LYNWOOD JOHNSON '55
HIRAM MILLER '55
Atlanta

•"My Yellow Jacket Girl" is on its way to Atlanta with Si's best wishes for an early revival.—ED.

I LIKE IT
Sirs:
My experience over the years has been that when I subscribe to a new magazine, intrigued by the advance publicity and promise, a feeling of disappointment follows. Such decidedly was not my experience with SI! I have enjoyed each issue thoroughly and think that you have reached just the proper balance of factual reporting, well-chosen pictures, amusing fiction, and accurate and complete sport results.

I intend to save my complete file and over the years it will be invaluable statistically. May I suggest that for the benefit of people like myself, you make available (for a moderate charge) a rather detailed index of the year's contents.

I am glad you have brought Paul Gallico back to the sports field. Those of us engaged in sports promotion have missed him.

Jimmy Jemails HOTBOX is a most interesting feature, and I see great possibilities of bringing out both sides of controversial questions in sports through this interesting type of presentation.

Herman Hickman and Roger Kahn's contributions are excellent and timely, but it really isn't fair to single out specific contributors because the whole magazine is excellent.

To sum up, as you have probably gathered from what I have said, I like your magazine!
JOHN REED KILPATRICK
President
Madison Square Garden Corp.
New York

•For a reader's reflection on General Kilpatrick's sporting career see 19TH HOLE, Oct. 25.—ED.

GOOD WILL
Sirs:
Now that I have had the pleasure of reading from cover to cover six issues of your magazine, I can no longer put off sending my congratulations.

Since I am especially interested in the ways that sports can promote understanding and good will between men and women of different nations, I am most impressed by the international flavor of SI.
JOHN JAY HOPKINS
Chairman and President
General Dynamics Corp.
New York

PAPA'S WINESKIN
Sirs:
Your picture story of outdoorsman Ernest Hemingway (SI, Oct. 4) has done much to remind us of "Papa's" many hunting and fishing expeditions at Sun Valley. Not only was SI's fishing picture taken here but also the pheasant and duck hunting scenes.

Hemingway's favorite drinking equipment during his visits was not a bottle as shown, but a Spanish wineskin from which his companions usually got more down their fronts than down their throats.

The enclosed photo shows Hemingway and the other man in SI's canoe picture, Taylor Williams, on an antelope hunt here in 1940. Williams, Sun Valley guide and long-time hunting and fishing companion of Hemingway's, by the way, is owner of the real first edition of "For Whom the Bell Tolls"; the bound galley proofs of the book with the author's marginal corrections.
WINSTON McCREA
Sun Valley, Id.

A PRO LOOKS AT SI
Sirs:
I was in dry dock with an eye operation when your No. 1 came out. In fact, it wasn't until about No. 5 that I was permitted to do any reading at all. I have faithfully read all of them except No. 2, which my wife forgot to buy, and in fact, have just finished the current issue.

This publication is a revelation to me of what a smart, able, professional crew can do. All the physical and technical aspects are approximately perfect, and until a man tries to do it himself he has no idea of what achieving that perfection involves, even with trained men and women and adequate capital. In those aspects alone your publication is a real monument to those who produce it.

As to content, I must admit that I am dumbfounded at the amount of generally interesting feature material that can be worked up concerning sports about which I care nothing. I don't give a damn about football, baseball, boxing, racing (horses), tennis, golf or sailing boats. And yet I have read about two-thirds of each of your issues, not from any sense of duty or professional curiosity but simply because the stuff looked interesting and, upon investigation, was interesting.

Whether you can keep up such a pace is more than I can judge; but if you can, it looks to me as if you are "in" with a vengeance. I certainly hope so, for a high-class, accurate, intimate approach to sports is something that the publication field has lacked since the old Sportsman folded up, and of course that did not even claim to cover the field at all fully.

I can imagine the hurly-burly of putting together a staff of "name" contributors, columnists and department heads and I think you have done a near-miracle....

I can see that you are still feeling around for the things that have the widest appeal and of course that is the only way to start anew publication. Each small change seems to me to be an improvement; I can't see any false moves, for whatever my opinion is worth. I admit that I was astonished at the very favorable response to your first fiction piece. It was a hell of a good one, really a natural for your particular publication, and I myself was heartily in favor of the idea—I thought it adorned the book. But I was in great doubt as to how the public would receive a fiction piece in this book. The response confirms my impression that my judgment is no good.

It was good to see Ed Zern back in print.... I am glad to see how he has developed the FISHERMAN'S CALENDAR. I assume that the material is accurate; and on that assumption the feature is an invaluable practical service to fishermen. It amuses and surprises me to find that I read the whole damn thing in spite of the fact that I didn't even buy a fishing license this year and in any case have no chance of fishing for bass in Missouri, muskies in Wisconsin or tarpon in Florida. He puts in just enough airy touches to make the material readable as reading matter, not just valuable information. You really picked the right man that time.

In this current issue, everything else is put in the shade by your color photos of the Gordon flybox. I've been through the mill on this vexing question of accurate color reproduction on flies, and if anyone had told me that the plates which you have could be made, I would have called him a liar. The internal evidence is that a number of people sweat blood to get them the way they are. Some of the hackles look a bit red but dammit, I think they were red; certainly no one could reproduce the tone of a ginger hackle more faithfully than several that you show. Shoot me if I'm wrong, but my impression is that it's a magnificent job. I've seen the originals—Carthew showed them to me several years ago—and as nearly as I can recall, you're right on the nose in these pictures.

Apparently you had some fishermen on the job in this story. There are a lot of little things about which it would have been easy to be wrong, and as nearly as I can tell they are all correct. The amount of digging done on this job is a compliment to the editorial policy and direction.

Your photography is out of this world. I know everyone else tells you the same thing so I won't labor the point. Don't see how it could be better. Marvelous.

Congratulations on having come so far so soon; it makes me feel good to see you local boys making good and I just hope that you can keep up this flood of feature pieces and angles. If you can, the world is yours.
ALFRED W. MILLER
New York

•SI's thanks to Mr. Miller, a great angler in the Gordon tradition and, under the name of Sparse Grey Hackle, a graceful and prolific commentator on all matters piscatorial.—ED.

EXIT A FAMILIAR NAME
Sirs:
Have no idea if you have heard of the death of William H. (Willie) Tucker Sr. here in Albuquerque, N.M., Oct. 6.

Briefly, the 83-year-old Englishman, who was born in London's outskirts in 1871 and moved to U.S. in 1895, is a familiar name to old-timers in golf and tennis world. He supervised construction of New York West Side Tennis Club courts in 1916, turfed Princeton's Palmer Stadium and built first "planned" golf course for St. Andrews in Yonkers. In all, he's built 121 courses or supervised design of such. Perhaps his greatest achievement was molding 7,250 yards of sagebrushed rough at University of New Mexico into site of ninth international Jaycee Golf Tourney here in 1951 for August tourney....
J. D. KAILER
Albuquerque, N.M.

SHARED LONELINESS
Sirs:
Bill Mauldin's "So There I Was..." which appeared in SI, Oct. 11 is a real gem. We, the members of room 219, enjoyed Bill's insight into the art of flying. For we too have experienced the same "terrestrial predicament" and the "incredible loneliness" expressed so vividly in his timely article.
HARRY B. GIEDINSKI
DENNIS J. GRUNDMAN
ROBERT J. LILLY
Navcads, USNR
U.S. Naval Air Station
Pensacola, Fla.

COMMOTION AND STRUGGLE
Sirs:
Since your first issue, your magazine has caused a good deal of commotion in this house. There are five of us, aged 13 to 40 and it is always a struggle to see who gets it first.

Frankly, I didn't care too much for sports before, but practically all of your articles are so timely and well written that I have developed a taste for football, which used to be my pet hate. My husband couldn't, even drag me to a game before. My son, Steve, loved the story about diving for treasure (SI, Oct. 4) and wants to be a deep-sea diver when he finishes school. It certainly was fascinating.

The first thing I turn to, though, is SOUNDTRACK, which is always most interesting and good reading and the humorous little drawings that come with that section by the artist who signs his name "Ajay." They are very clever and my older boy has taken to pasting them up in an SI scrap-book along with your color photographs.

Give us more of all these swell items and maybe sometime an article on old-time fighters which my husband would like to see. We all think you have a fine magazine.
BETTI RAYMOND
Sacramento, Calif.

FOR ARKANSAS READ ARANSAS
Sirs:
On page 39 of SI, Sept. 20, writer John O'Reilly mentions the "Arkansas" National Wildlife Refuge near Corpus Christi, Texas. On page 67 of SI, Oct. 4, under Coming Events, Fishing, you list the Annual Tarpon Rodeo, Port "Arkansas," Texas.

On the chance that someone besides the typesetter might be careless, I believe a check of the map will show it is "Aransas" rather than "Arkansas."

You have a tremendous idea in your publication, something long needed in the field of sports reporting. My fervent hope is that you will not allow the whining criticism of the pea brains, spoon-fed on the stereotyped newspaper approach to sports reporting, to influence you into backing water with your project.
CHARLES L. CHAMBERS
Houston

•Thanks. Aransas it will be from now on.—ED.

NOSTALGIC PLEASURE
Sirs:
As another thirteen-year-old boy who stood in line on that gray, chilly morning of October 6, 1917 to witness the opening game of the White Sox-Giants series, I read your article in SI with the keenest of pleasure.

At that time I lived at 4163 Wentworth Avenue, a fairly short walk from the ball park, and took my place in line directly across from the Seventh Regiment Armory.... The armory, incidentally, is still standing.

SI certainly catches the feel of that morning: the dampness, the long wait, the bantering among the men, and much speculation as to the opposing pitchers.

I am certain you feel as I do: that to those who saw the 1916-1920 White Sox in action, all baseball thereafter was an anticlimax.

Many thanks for some moments of nostalgic pleasure.
JOSEPH C. LUTZ
Forest Park, Ill.

DON'T MEASURE THEM
Sirs:
Just to keep the record straight, the smallest heavyweight boxing champion, as one of your readers says (19TH HOLE, Oct. 11), was not Tommy Burns. He was the shortest. But we don't measure boxers by height, but by weight.

On that basis, Burns was the third smallest. The smallest, i.e., lightest, heavyweight champion was Jem Mace, who antedated John L. Sullivan by about 20 years. He stood 5'9", weighed 152 lbs. Second smallest was Fitzsimmons who, according to Robert H. Davis who weighed him in, weighed 156½ lbs. the day he whipped Corbett. He was 5'11¾" in height.

Burns, with a height of 5'7½", was the shortest. But he was heavy for that height, and weighed 169 lbs.
CHARLES B. ROTH
Denver, Col.

PHOTOSI READERS GILLIS AND TEWANIMAILLUSTRATIONSEE "INTERCOLLEGIATE SONGBOOK"PHOTOPAPA AND PROOFREADERPHOTOWILLIE TUCKER

CLASS

SKIPPER

BOAT FOR BOAT

CORRECTED TIME

5-0-5

Eric Olsen

4

1

Thistle

H. Boston

7

2

Inter. 14

J. Carter

11

3

Highlander

W. S. Cox

5

3

E Scow

Harry Melges

1

5

Jolly

G. O'Day

10

6

Rebel 22

J. Bludworth

9

7

A Scow

W. Grunow

6

8

Raven

D. Matthews

3

9

S Class

W. Willcox

2

10

210

H. McMichael

8

11

Lightning

R. Crane

13

11

110

C. Shields Jr.

14

11

Y-Flyer

Harry Jones

17

14

C Scow

C. Lind

12

15

Fly. Dutchman

J. Van Voast

18

16

Buccaneer

M. Bludworth

19

17

Snipe

T. Whittemore

24

18

Windmill

D. Cochran

20

19

Q.A. 17

J. Mulfeld

16

20

Catamaran 20

E. Mullen

21

21

Dominion

S. F. Dakin

22

22

Indian

I. King

23

23

Catamaran 38

B. Colgate

15

24

Fireball

S. Corkery

25

25

K Class

B. Hutchinson

26

26

M-16

C. Green

27

27