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A CAST IN THE DARK

Nov. 08, 1954
Nov. 08, 1954

Table of Contents
Nov. 8, 1954

Pat On The Back
  • Herewith a salute from the editors to men and women of all ages who have fairly earned the good opinion of the world of sport, regardless of whether they have yet earned its tallest headlines

Under 21
Table of Contents
Soundtrack
Spectacle
  • Caber tosser strives for perfection in most colorful event of Braemar Games—climactic festival in series of Highland games first instituted by the ancient Celts

Berg And Wilkinson
  • One of America's greatest golfers recalls her childhood days in Minneapolis when she was quarterback of the 50th-Street Tigers and Bud Wilkinson, now the coach of the University of Oklahoma Sooners, was the right tackle. Patty takes no credit for Wilkinson's success at Oklahoma, but she does feel that plays she ran over him may have contributed to his education

Health
Golf
Sporting Look
Horse Racing
Acknowledgments
Fisherman's Calendar
Nature
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

A CAST IN THE DARK

November nights are the nights of the true striped-bass fishermen. A prize may lurk 50 yards out and in the roaring dark each blind cast carries a prayer

More plugs, jigs, squids and eels are hurled into the sea for striped bass than for all other fish of the surf. Most of this is done in summertime under a tanning sun. But the really good striper fishing comes in the East after summer vacations are over and reaches a peak in November. It is then that the pros walk the deserted beaches in bitter weather, casting the night tides for reasons beyond the ken of most casual summer folk, lured by the soaring waves and the big fish feeding in them.

This is an article from the Nov. 8, 1954 issue Original Layout

Fishing in the dark is a truly emotional experience. In the cold, black loneliness the fisherman enters an intensely personal world in which he uses senses fully developed only by the blind. He listens with agonizing care over the sound of the surf for the tail-slap of a feeding bass. The powerful sea currents tug at his line and tell him what his eyes cannot see of the area he fishes. His numbed fingers are miraculously alive to the nuances of the retrieve. The discomfort of November in nighttime is kept at bay by an imagination fired with the knowledge that this is the great foregathering time of stripers before they move south. And so the bulletlike casts continue with the methodical precision of a long-mastered craft. Short casts, long casts, traversing casts—the next one will surely do it.

PHOTORALPH MORSEILLUSTRATION