Search

THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF SPORT

Nov. 29, 1954
Nov. 29, 1954

Table of Contents
Nov. 29, 1954

Pat On The Back
  • Herewith a salute from the editors to men and women of all ages who have fairly earned the good opinion of the world of sport, regardless of whether they have yet earned its tallest headlines

Bladder-Ball
  • Yale undergraduates, grunting up and down the sacred sod of old campus, revive a tradition of the '90s with "First Annual Bladder-Ball Contest"

Glory Day In Columbus, Ohio
The Wonderful World Of Sport
Spectacle
  • Underground explorers enter the dark mouth of a Kentucky cave. A tortuous and dangerous descent lies ahead, but spelunkers find the perils justified by the exotic scenery

Soundtrack
  • THE EDITORS POINT TO ONE EFFECT OF POLITE CARTELS IN THE BOWL BUSINESS AND REGISTER DISSENT ON A BOXING-REFORM ALTERNATIVE, BUT THEY ARE CHEERED BY A BAD FIGHT AND A BACK-TALKING COACH

A Call To Arms
Sport In Art
  • It was a purposeful part of the traditional preparations for Thanksgiving among Americans of the last century—and in some rural areas it still is

Sporting Look
Weidman
Golf
Army-Navy Soccer
Fisherman's Calendar
Acknowledgments
Health
Yesterday
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF SPORT

'LET ME CALL YOU SWEETHEART'...

This is an article from the Nov. 29, 1954 issue Original Layout

So chorused 3,325 fight fans in Madison Square Garden last week in scornful reaction to the match between Light Heavyweights Floyd Patterson (left) and Jimmy Slade (recumbent). The bout began as if the 19-year-old Patterson had taken to heart and fist all the harsh words said about the fight game lately. Early in the first round he dropped Slade for a count of eight, felled him four more times in the eight rounds to win an easy decision, while the usually able Slade ran for dear life when he was not falling into a clinch. One onlooker who did not join in the chorus was Robert K. Christenberry, Athletic Commission boss. He held up Slade's purse for 72 hours, until convinced by Slade he had done his best. For other sweetheart scenes of the week, see opposite page.

Don Cockell, beefy British heavyweight, rubbed noses with one of his prize pigs, Sally the Sow, while doing chores around his farm in Sussex. British Empire heavyweight champion, Cockell is one of the leading contenders for Rocky Marciano's crown.

Kinvarra Deacon Malone, champion setter, gave three-year-old Aaron Baer of West Hempstead, N.Y. an affectionate nuzzle on meeting in pet shop. Ch. Malone, an occasional television performer, will compete in Brooklyn Kennel Club show next month.

Mrs. Barbara Thurston embraced huge marlin caught off Oahu, T.H. by George Parker. Confusion arose over whether the 1,002-pound fish was striped, black or silver marlin, meant the difference between a world's record or just another big fish.

PLEASING PERFORMANCES

IN THE RINK
Joni Pearce, a member of an ice-show company, turned up on the outdoor rink at Rockefeller Plaza, New York City, did a series of early-season fancy turns, helped to launch one of the winter's most popular participant and spectator sports.

IN THE RING
Jimmy Carter hammered game Paddy DeMarco to floor for the count of four in ninth round of nationally televised fight at San Francisco Cow Palace, and scored a TKO in 15th round to win back lightweight title which DeMarco took from him last March. Outclassed by the hard-hitting, clever-boxing Carter, DeMarco gave millions of viewers a fine show, refusing to quit while taking terrific beating, including another knockdown.

IN THE FIELD
Mark Trailer, a two-year-old German short-haired pointer, hurdled a fence in a field near Chicago while tenderly carrying in his mouth a pheasant which had just been shot down as the Illinois season opened. Despite his prodigious leap, Mark Trailer performed in the best bird-dog tradition; he failed to leave any marks on the bird he brought in.

SEVEN PHOTOS