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SLIMMER SWIMMERS

Dec. 20, 1954
Dec. 20, 1954

Table of Contents
Dec. 20, 1954

Pat On The Back
  • Herewith a salute from the editors to men and women of all ages who have fairly earned the good opinion of the world of sport, regardless of whether they have yet earned its tallest headlines

Baseball
The Wonderful World Of Sport
Spectacle
  • Mongoose and king cobra—legendary enemies—square off in their classic and rarely photographed encounter near Mysore, India. Here the mongoose, master of the quick dart, dances and feints to make the cobra strike—and miss. Then the little snake-hater himself will strike. Photographs on the following pages show what happened

Soundtrack
  • THE EDITORS TAKE NOTE OF A WEEK IN WHICH JAMES D. NORRIS SAID "ABSURD," MAX SCHMELING REMEMBERED AN UNEXPECTEDLY HARD FIGHT AND A VETERAN SPORTSWRITER REMEMBERED THE NAME NORRIS

Weight Lifting
  • The art of weight lifting, according to champions, requires powerful thought. without it, the lifter's power is directionless; but if his thinking is right, he'll feel as though he were alone in a void, and he may never notice the weight as he lifts

  • By William F. Talbert

    Last week Harry Hopman, captain of Australia's Davis Cup team, predicted a clear-cut victory for his side. Now the U.S. captain replies—with some different opinions

Davis Cup Preview
Tip From The Top
Boating
Sporting Look
Bowling
Acknowledgments
Motor Sports
Under 21
Snow Patrol
Fisherman's Calendar
Yesterday
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

SLIMMER SWIMMERS

It takes more art than artifice to reshape what's seashape. Here are seven new ways

Beaches are going to look different in 1955. The full-blown American bathing beauty, whose favorite swim suit in 1954 was a candy-striped cotton bloomer, will this year be as compressed as a long-stemmed rosebud. Bathing suit designers from New York to California, following the Paris edict against busts and hips, have contrived a number of new ways to control them. By lengthening the torso and rounding out the curves with the new knitted and lightly boned striped swim suits such designers as Carolyn Schnurer, Claire McCardell, Rose Marie Reid have changed America's goddess from a Venus to a Diana. The American male can take a look at the shape of his future on these four pages in photographs made at the Beverly Hills pool of Mr. Philip Ilsley.

This is an article from the Dec. 20, 1954 issue Original Layout

Slim and tall in the California sun, Rita Aarons displays Rose Marie Reid's new striped lastex bathing suit, boned from bust to hip ($19.95).

The most advanced bathing suits seen at America's resorts this winter and next summer will be these striped knits. Two-piece wool and lastex striped suit worn by Lois Langley is by Isabel Dobson of Cabana ($15). Tyrolean straw beach hat by Bill Hawes ($8.50).

Even two-piece suits, due for a comeback, have a new shape. This striped knit by Tom Brigance, worn here by model JoAnne Aehle, is barest suit he ever made, has bandeau-type bra (about $23).

This high-top knitted suit by Claire McCardell features strategically spaced blue and red stripes ($29.95). With it, Jimmy Mitchell wears Bill Hawes's Buster Brown beach hat ($8.50). Striped suits and straw accessories show Riviera influence.

Joan Bundy gets hair-drying from Ralph Davidson after swim in Carolyn Schnurer's knit suit with strap down the center back (about $18). Davidson's Matellot shirt is from Bill Riley's, Beverly Hills ($6.95); his orange trunks by Jantzen ($4.95).

Jimmy Mitchell's red wool knitted bathing suit has one shoulder strap, is from Greta Plattry's Greek collection ($19.95). JoAnne Aehle's tank-top knitted suit has striped front panel, deep V-neckline, recalls Gertrude Ederle's day. By Catalina ($17.95).

SIX PHOTOSCHRISTA