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PAT ON THE BACK

Jan. 10, 1955
Jan. 10, 1955

Table of Contents
Jan. 10, 1955

Pat On The Back
  • A salute from the editors to men and women of all ages who have fairly earned the good opinion of the world of sport, if not its tallest headlines

Football's Fiesta Day
The Wonderful World Of Basketball
Spectacle
Soundtrack
  • THE EDITORS NOTE WITH ADMIRATION SAMMY LEE'S REBUTTAL TO AN ASIAN COMMUNIST, THE SECRETARY OF STATE'S DEMAND FOR TENNIS BRIEFING AND THE DESCENT OF 26 CALIFORNIA KELPS ON NEW YORK

NCAA Fight
Pheasant Shoot
Under 21
Bowling
Davis Cup
  • By William F. Talbert/U.S. Davis Cup Team Captain

    America's victory in the Davis Cup Challenge Round actually began 12 months ago—after U.S. defeat at Kooyong. There and then Captain Talbert and his squad put into effect a winning formula

Snow Patrol
Fisherman's Calendar
Acknowledgments
Basketball
Golf
Tip From The Top
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

PAT ON THE BACK

A salute from the editors to men and women of all ages who have fairly earned the good opinion of the world of sport, if not its tallest headlines

MARGIE MORTON
Four years ago, as a freshman in Douglas (Wyo.) High School, Margie Morton took up riflery because "it looked like fun." Today, 18 and pretty, blonde Margie has made the rifle team at the University of Arizona, where she is studying for a degree in archaeology. While still in high school, Margie was Wyoming's junior girl's champion for two years, ranked 35th nationally. She currently holds fifth place on the team, usually averages between 360 and 365 out of a possible 400 on the target range. Margie never lacks for male escorts at college but insists her heart belongs to a cowboy back home in Douglas.

This is an article from the Jan. 10, 1955 issue

JOHN DOYLE
John Joseph Doyle came to the U.S. from Killorglin, Ireland and was so fascinated with baseball that he has been at it since his teens. Now 84, he lives in Holyoke, Mass., still serves as a scout for the Chicago Cubs. In a 16-year career as player, John played every position but shortstop, managed the New York Giants and the Washington Nationals, hit .300 eight times. His greatest years were with the legendary Baltimore Orioles of 1896 and 1897 as a first baseman, when he hit .345 and .356. His biggest scouting find was Catcher Gabby Hartnett.

TWO PHOTOS