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PHEASANTS FROM THE HILL

Jan. 10, 1955
Jan. 10, 1955

Table of Contents
Jan. 10, 1955

Pat On The Back
  • A salute from the editors to men and women of all ages who have fairly earned the good opinion of the world of sport, if not its tallest headlines

Football's Fiesta Day
The Wonderful World Of Basketball
Spectacle
Soundtrack
  • THE EDITORS NOTE WITH ADMIRATION SAMMY LEE'S REBUTTAL TO AN ASIAN COMMUNIST, THE SECRETARY OF STATE'S DEMAND FOR TENNIS BRIEFING AND THE DESCENT OF 26 CALIFORNIA KELPS ON NEW YORK

NCAA Fight
Pheasant Shoot
Under 21
Bowling
Davis Cup
  • By William F. Talbert/U.S. Davis Cup Team Captain

    America's victory in the Davis Cup Challenge Round actually began 12 months ago—after U.S. defeat at Kooyong. There and then Captain Talbert and his squad put into effect a winning formula

Snow Patrol
Fisherman's Calendar
Acknowledgments
Basketball
Golf
Tip From The Top
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

PHEASANTS FROM THE HILL

On an unusual hunting preserve at Millbrook, N.Y., birds are flown from a hilltop in a deliberate attempt to make it tough for the gunners below

As the first of the 150 pheasants rose from concealing evergreens on top of the hill and flew with the wind, many of the hunters deployed below Van Alen's Hill at Millbrook, N.Y. thought: "This is going to be murder." A solid line of fire awaited the birds from a dozen or more "butts" placed in the field below. This was shooting in the English style of "driven birds," staged by John S. Martin at Wingover Shoots on the Separate Game Farm; and for the hunters it held surprises.

This is an article from the Jan. 10, 1955 issue

The pheasants found freedom in a quick burst of speed, then coasted on set wings, dropping tantalizingly toward the waiting guns. There was an outburst of firing—but not a bird fell. It looked easy; but the gunners, like many a Briton before them, learned the hard way that an incoming pheasant is one of the most deceiving of targets.

Wingover offers paying hunters a double chance during the long preserve season—a hill shoot in the morning and conventional field-shooting afterward—and the participants got their money's worth on this day. Not all of the pheasants released on that first flight fared so well. Hard-pressed gunners remembered to take going-away shots which were easier than the crossing and dropping pheasants. Then, to vary the pace, 50 chukar partridges were flung from the hill.

After lunch, the party took to the field for the more conventional hunting (see next page). By the end of the day 79% of the birds were recovered.

Tossed pheasant hurtles upward and away from release point on hill at left.

Racing pheasant streaks for the woods and briefly offers a crossing shot to waiting "gun" below.

Pressed shooter gets set to fire second gun as loader attends to his first. This is Sportsman Laddie Sanford and wife.

Famed shot Eltinge P. Warner, a bird hunter for half a century, concentrated on the pheasants that others failed to hit.

Decapitated bird, result of knowing shot at close range, is shown by Grad Sears, retired president of United Artists.

Field-shot birds which were part of the afternoon-hunt bag are carried by Jackson Schultz, who managed the day's shoot.

GUNNERS AND DOGS ROAM THE FIELDS SURROUNDING THE HILL IN A FINAL HUNT. MANY BIRDS ESCAPED INTO COUNTRYSIDE

SEVEN PHOTOS