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THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF SPORT

Jan. 24, 1955
Jan. 24, 1955

Table of Contents
Jan. 24, 1955

Pat On The Back
  • A salute to those who have earned the good opinion of the world of sport, if not yet its tallest headlines

Hockey
Soundtrack
  • THE EDITORS EXAMINE 1955 ON ITS EARLY FORM, INCLUDING NEWS FROM WILLIE MAYS AND AN ESKIMO NAMED PUPPYGITWOK—AND SOME WORDS ABOUT COMMON SENSE AND COMMON HONESTY IN U.S. BOXING

The Wonderful World Of Sport
Skiing
Motor Sports
A Place To Be
Sporting Look
  • BLAZERS 36

    You don't have to be a musical comedy man or own a yacht to follow this year's most versatile clothing revival—the blazer

Basketball
Bridge
Snow Patrol
Acknowledgments
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF SPORT

MIDSUMMER MADNESS IS AN OLD STORY BUT PEOPLE LIKEWISE DO STRANGE THINGS IN WINTER; HEREWITH THREE PAGES OF EXAMPLES...

This is an article from the Jan. 24, 1955 issue

ITEM NO. 1
The hand proferring a dead fish above belongs to a skin diver named Richard Ferg who prowled under the ice off a Connecticut lake to see what it was like. He found it cold, dark and very dangerous

ITEM NO. 2
Nervy divers plummet 100 feet for world title and $500 cash

It comes gently, but winter does come to Panama City, Panama, and with it bold divers to compete at dizzy heights for the world's professional high-diving title. As the present champion, Don Hopka, flashed downward from 100 feet in a gainer, both the pool and the $500 first prize seemed very small.

ITEM NO. 3
English wags unite to rescue women from pitfalls and pratfalls of skiing

Some men cloak their madder moments in a righteous cause, and that is why a squad of English collegians suddenly appeared wearing black ties, dress shirts and tuxedos on the ski slopes of Zurs, Austria. They had banded together to rescue "fallen women," and a ski slope seemed the perfect place. Why the tuxedos? To give skiing a much-needed touch of elegance. Down the mountain they sped like gaunt and giddy penguins.

At the bottom they rescued a comely vacationer, Jacqueline Popper. She had not fallen, but any minute, figured the collegians, in such cold weather and such a skimpy chiffon dress, Jacqueline might be frozen stiffer than a Yule log.

THREE PHOTOSPHOTOCLAIMING THEY RESCUED HER. COLLEGIANS TOAST MISS POPPER WITH CHAMPAGNE