THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF SPORT

March 07, 1955

SOLOS OF THE WEEK

Platform diver Juno Stover Irwin, 23, of Glendale, Calif. won 10-meter Pan American Games tryouts.

Three-meter winner at tryouts in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. was a pretty 18-year-old diver, Jean Stunyo of Grosse Pointe, Mich.

Olympic champion Jim McLane, ex-Yale star, won 1,500-meter swim to qualify for Games.

World record for 220-yard freestyle was set by U. of Michigan's exultant Jack Wardrop, who beat former record holder Ford Konno in 2:03.9 at Ann Arbor.

DUETS OF THE WEEK

Tête-à-têtes took place between sociable camels in London zoo and Fighter Don Cockell of Britain and Heavyweight Champion Rocky Marciano in the offices of the International Boxing Club in New York. Cockell came to sign contract for May title fight.

Victory busses went to winners of international pancake race among housewives of Liberal, Kan., and Olney, England. British Consul H. J. Legg kissed over-all winner Mrs. Binnie Dick of Liberal, Verger Bill Mynard saluted Olney's Mrs. Doris Millward.

ROYAL ARABIAN BASKETBALL

The King of Saudi Arabia is a basketball fan. During a visit to the U.S. in 1947, as Crown Prince, he marveled at the size of New York City, toured industrial plants, attended diplomatic functions, learned the names of all makes of U.S. cars (he recognized only Cadillac and Pierce Arrow until then) and joyfully discovered the ball-and-hoop game.

When he returned to his oil-rich country (three times the size of Texas, about the same population as Michigan—6,500,000) he immediately hired a Moslem athletic director from Jerusalem to teach his sons basketball. King Saud has no trouble fielding enough players; he has 37 sons (nobody bothers to count the daughters) from his 20-odd wives.

Today, on a standard size court just off the Al Maseira Palace grounds, the princes between the ages of 8 and 13 play a game for His Majesty every week. The winning team receives a solid-gold cup, specially imported from the U.S. Already enough cups have been awarded to make almost every prince the proud owner of a royal basketball trophy.

Young Prince practices passing basketball before regular game begins.

Solid-Gold cup trophy stands before King Saud watching game while holding Prince Turki.

PRINCES WEARING DIFFERENTLY STRIPED SHIRTS TO DENOTE TEAMS SCRAMBLE FOR BALL. FINAL SCORE FOR THIS GAME WAS 8-5

IN PREGAME CEREMONY PLAYERS LINE UP BEFORE FATHER, CLICK HEELS, SALUTE, SHOUT ARABIAN FORM OF "GOD SAVE THE KING"

ROYALTY ON RUNNERS AND A RAFT

Sampling the available sports in widely separate parts of the world last week were a number of young people born to the purple. True to their Scandinavian heritages, the heirs to the thrones of Sweden and Denmark were in the mountains where they gracefully took to their skis. In a sun-warmed latitude, the world's most publicized princess, nearing the end of a state tour, took a cruise on one of the oldest types of craft known. The rough hewn bamboo raft was a far cry from the plush barge "like a burnish'd throne" which a royal lady of the Nile used long ago.

Crown Prince Karl Gustav of Sweden, 8, engages in snowball duel while skiing near Stockholm during school holidays.

Princess Margrethe, 14, heiress apparent to Danish throne, starts a run down mountain slope in central Norway.

Princess Margaret of Britain goes bareheaded in tropic sun as she floats down Jamaica's Rio Grande on a bamboo raft during her visit to the Caribbean island. Lady Foot, wife of the Jamaica governor, accompanies Princess Margaret on the trip.

EIGHT PHOTOS FOUR PHOTOSMARIA LA YACONA THREE PHOTOS

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)