JUSTICE
Sirs:
Just read the college hockey story (SI, Feb. 21). It was nothing short of terrific and we all feel you did real justice to a great and growing sport.
K. G. FREYSCHLAG
Colorado College
Colorado Springs, Col.

BRIEF BUT ADEQUATE
Sirs:
Congratulations on your article U. S. Colleges Take to the Ice. This is the first magazine article I've read which gives brief, but adequate, coverage to the subject.
FRED WHITNEY
Syracuse, N.Y.

SHALL I SAY MIFFED?
Sirs:
As a Hamilton College (located about 12 miles southeast of Utica, N.Y.) graduate I was a little miffed, shall I say, with the lack of mention of this great little college in your article on college hockey in your Feb. 21 issue.

Back in the late teens and early 20s a group of students at Hamilton decided they wanted to play hockey. They were granted permission to flood and maintain an area in the open behind one of the dorms. This they did and before long were playing quite a rugged schedule.

The student body was less than 400 in those days, but by 1923 they were playing a schedule consisting of such teams as St. Lawrence, Clarkson, RPI, Cornell, Colgate, Yale, Harvard, Penn, Williams, Princeton, McGill, Queens, Amherst and others. If my memory serves me correctly, they never had a losing season from the fall of 1920 to the spring of 1928. In fact, I would be surprised if they hadn't had winning seasons up until the time the importation of Canadian players began.

Mr. Albert I. Prettyman, Hamilton College Athletic Director at that time, took over the reins as hockey coach. He was so well thought of that later he was asked to guide the destinies of the U.S. Olympic hockey team in 1936. A member of the Hamilton team, Francis F. Baker, was on the Olympic squad in that year.

It is interesting to note that Hamilton was the first college to have an enclosed rink, with the possible exception of the Hobey Baker rink at Princeton.

Even without Canadian imports, Hamilton still fields a pretty fair hockey team.
MARVIN H. HOWK
Rochester, N.Y.

•Hamilton's big year was '21, when team went undefeated against strong opposition. This season was a rather lean one, with wins only over Springfield, the Alumni and AIC; a tied game with Williams; and losses against Clarkson, Army, Williams, RPI, Middlebury, St. Lawrence, Queens and Norwich.—ED.

FAMILIAR PARALLEL
Sirs:
SI's U.S. Colleges Take to the lee did wonders in building up college hockey. My interest stems from the fact that four of my best friends are currently enrolled at North Dakota University on hockey scholarships. I feel, like many more of my Canadian counterparts, that the Canadian boys can only do good for the best spectator sport of the winter months.

There is a familiar parallel to the way the American stars have built up our Canadian football in the last five or six years. We welcomed them with open arms, not in the light that they would steal the limelight. We in Canada like to feel that our Canadian hockey players are received in like manner. Let the Canadian boys participate and they can't but help to foster the game in a true sportsmanlike fashion.

Hats off again to a truly great sport.
RONALD W. CALDER
Winnipeg, Manitoba

HAT TRICK
Sirs:
With your Feb. 21 issue, SI went on my required reading list. At last your magazine has recognized the growing popularity of collegiate hockey.

We hockey fans in the North Country were pleased to read Whitney Tower's article and hope that it is an indication that SI will keep an eye on collegiate hockey.

I have an item of news which may interest your hockey readers. Last weekend the AP carried a story about Jim Pope, a defense man from RPI who made three goals in 1:48 minutes in the Northeastern game. We agree this is a feat, but we think credit should be given to our own Tommy Meeker, right wing on the first line, who turned in the hat trick (three goals) in 15 seconds in the Clarkson-Hamilton game here on February 12. Tommy, the brother of Canadian hockey pro Howie Meeker, scored at 19:18, 19:28 and 19:33 of the first period of that game.
BETTY BADERMAN
Potsdam, N.Y.

WINGIN' AWAY?
Sirs:
I bet the No. 10 horse! Did I get left at the post or am I wingin' away on top?
JACK C. ROSSETTER
Elmwood Park, Ill.

•You were in your stall munching oats. No. 10, Trout Lure, was scratched just before the race. No. 9, Dove Tint, went to the post with 10 other horses in the first race, January 19th, at Hialeah, a mile and a furlong, $3,500 claiming race. No. 1, Halcyon Chance, hugged the rail after the break (see cut), led at every pole and won. No. 5, Chief Loco, placed and Toy Fox, No. 7, found a way out of the scramble to show. Dopesters Rossetter and Hendrix (see below) are in good company: few present that day believed that Halcyon Chance, never a winner in 21 starts, was aptly named.—ED.

CURIOUS SCRAMBLE
Sirs:
Having enjoyed the excitement of Mark Kauffman's Feb. 28 cover of the Hialeah scramble for position, could you satisfy my curiosity in letting me know who won? No. 9 looked like a strong horse.
JOHN HENDRIX
Grand Island, Neb.

•Looks are deceptive. See above.—ED.

UNAVERAGE ANGELS
Sirs:
I sincerely appreciate your article on the U.S. Navy Flight Demonstration Team (SI, Feb. 21) (Blue Angels). However, the Navy does not consider that this type of flying is a sport. It is hard, exacting work designed to demonstrate to flight students and to the American public the capabilities of modern, carrier-based fighter aircraft and the basic techniques and maneuvers of the Naval aviator. Naturally, of course, the average pilot is not called upon to perform these maneuvers at low altitude or with such close spacing.

Notwithstanding this small complaint, I thoroughly enjoy each issue of SI.
A. K. DOYLE
Vice Admiral, USN
Chief of Naval Air Training
Pensacola, Fla.

•SI called the Blue Angels' acrobatics "the most expensive and exclusive of sports," pointed out that although cost and skill limited participation to a handful of naval aviators, millions of spectators have witnessed the weekly air shows.—ED.

BLUE ANGELS VS. SKY BLAZERS
Sirs:
Re your Blue Angels photo article in the Feb. 21 issue of SI. Knock it off, Mac! The Angels are strictly for the birds. The USAF has had jet stunt teams since the days of the F-80s, and the U.S. Navy, always on the ball to pick up a good deal that someone else had gotten to rolling, latched onto this idea of a jet stunt team.

Like old Nate Forrest, the USAF is usually the fustest with the mostest, and one of the 'mostest' is Major Harry K. Evans, commander of the 509th Fighter-Bomber Squadron at Langley AFB, Va., originator, trainer and mentor of the Air Force's "Sky Blazers," an F-84 jet acrobatic team that not only parlayed USAF influence and skills in the skies of Europe, but kept the ante up to its present-day high. This major is somewhat fantastic, too. Has over 3,000 jet hours and when his plane conked out on him not too long ago at altitude he was far from smashing down on the old red 'panic button.' Instead, "...so I lit a cigarette and rode her down to 5,000 before ejecting...."

Major Evans is a great pilot who brooks no sloppiness. As a result he's got a hot outfit, and if the "Blue Angels" start gimmicking around Langley they'd better look out, for the "master" will probably show them a few tricks of the trade!
SERGEANT'S NAME WITHHELD
Langley Air Force Base, Va.

LOVE LITTER
Sirs:
We raise our dripping hands in salute to SI for nationally publicizing underwater sports events.

Our latest cheers—for "Under the Ice" (SI, Feb. 21), which illustrates the point that skin diving can be fun any time.

For proof that even ice diving has its rewards : submerging under eight inches of ice, we found in addition to two automobiles, three silver trophies awarded to a team in 1910, a flintlock pistol, long-playing records and an old shovel. Most engaging item: a suitcase of love letters (revealing the past of a young lady from Chicago). After a studied examination, the club ceremoniously burned all evidence.
VERN PETERSEN
Chicago

FORGIVE AND FORGET
Sirs:
This, my very first letter to the editor in a long lifetime, is to complain that you not only failed to mention in your Feb. 28 issue that Iowa defeated Michigan State and Illinois—both strong teams—over the weekend; but you incorrectly credited Minnesota with having "outfought" Iowa 80-70.

The volume of letters such as this that you receive from Iowans should be a significant test of the current circulation and readership of SI in Iowa.

Iowa fans will forgive and forget if your next issue prominently mentions the victory fully expected by Iowa over Minnesota next Monday, which will be the big one.
L. H. MARTIN
Des Moines, Iowa

•The volume was high. It was, of course, Indiana that bowed to Minnesota. Iowa's wins over Michigan State, Illinois and Minnesota all occurred too late in the editorial week to be listed anywhere except in SCOREBOARD'S "Other Results."—ED.

$500 FOR A CASUAL BROWSING
Sirs:
On the radio program College Quiz, four young men representing Notre Dame lost to four young women from Holyoke 190 to 175. The Notre Dame quartet missed the two last questions, worth 10 points each, and therewith lost the contest. In those questions they were asked to identify the names Hayes Alan Jenkins and Kippax Fearnought.

Please mail four sample copies of SI to the College Quiz Team, Notre Dame University, South Bend, Indiana, and point out to the four young men that even a casual browsing through the issues of Feb. 14 and 28 would have supplied them with the information necessary to win $500 for their university.
ALVAR NORBECK
Minneapolis

WHERE?
Sirs:
Like many thousand other readers, I would like information as to where the three midget cars, Tri-Car, Messerschmitt and Isetta (SI, Feb. 28) might be available in this country. The Alfa Romeo BAT 5 also sounds very interesting and any additional information you may have on that car will be very greatly appreciated.
V. B. STONECIPHER
Chattanooga, Tenn.

•The Tri-Car is available f.o.b. Wheatland, Pa. at $995 for the Suburbanette and $1,095 for the Stationette model. Headquarters for the company is 1010 Vermont Avenue, Washington, D.C. The Messerschmitt costs $895 f.o.b. New York, and Gordon Motors Corp., 93 Nassau Street, New York are the people to talk to. The Isetta ($995 f.o.b. New York) has just arrived in the showroom of Ducati Motors, 1877 Broadway, New York. But the Alfa Romeo BAT 5, an experimental model, is available only on special order (from Ducati). Put in your order with a $25,000 check and you can cruise silently at 160 mph in a highly unorthodox (inward-sloping rear fender fins), aero-dynamically correct body.—ED.

HERE IS A COMER
Sirs:
I read with much interest your article on Frank Selvy's brother (SI, Feb. 28). He sounds like a comer and more power to him. All of which prompts this letter calling your attention to Pete Corbett of Christian Brothers Academy at Syracuse, N.Y.

He is 17 years old, a junior, is 6 feet 10 inches tall. In one game he scored 51 points (21 B. 9 P.). Another game, 42 points. Another, he scored 43 points and his team broke a high-score record with 115-79. During this game he must have set some sort of a record when he made good on 23 of 27 tries from the foul line. The last I heard he had broken the all-time scoring record of 358. In this game he got 28 points, which gave him 379 points for 12 games with two still to be played.

The City League is as fast a high school league as there is in western N.Y., so the teams CBA played were no pushovers. Thanks for reading thus far. May it be of interest to you.
A. B. PATTERSON
Newton Centre, Mass.

P.S. Curiosity got the best of me. I just phoned Syracuse and learned that they won their last game and the championship. Corbett tallied 33 points and ended up the season with 429 points.

A BIG $110,900
Sirs:
Enjoyed reading in SI, Feb. 28 Albion Hughes's excellent article on the coming Flamingo Stakes at Hialeah on Saturday.

However, in fairness to Jockey Willie Hartack, whom he mentioned as never yet winning a really big stake race, it should be recalled that last Labor Day Hartack, in collaboration with Ada Rice's Pet Bully, took top honors in the $167,850 Washington Park Handicap at Chicago. The winner's share was $110,900!
VIC THORNTON
Naperville, Ill.

•True, Jockey Hartack hit some big jackpots with victories in the Woodward Memorial ($50,000), U.N. Handicap ($67,500), as well as the Washington Park Handicap. Hartack has for the last two years placed second in number of wins to Willie Shoemaker, is better known for just plain winning than for winning major classics (i.e., Derby, Preakness, Belmont etc.). But at 22 he has many a season ahead of him.—ED.

THE MASTER AND THE MYSTERY
Sirs:
Messrs. McDowell and Tinanoff are entirely correct in their letters published in 19th HOLE, Feb. 21.

When your reporter said that the figure of 53 plus times 10 to the 27th power should be multiplied by 24 he was entirely wrong. I don't know whether or not Mr. Sheinwold was responsible for the error. I do know that I never concurred in any way, shape or form.

If your reporter had wished to give my exact connection with the mystery he would have said that I told him that the duplication was the result of neither hand being shuffled and that the hand resulted from the fact that new decks are always put into duplicate boards in the same fashion. Based on this statement by me he did an excellent reportorial job by actually tracking down the man who puts the cards in the boards and seeing how he does it etc.

My other connection was to give him the figure of 53 etc. I said at the time that I had shown how to calculate in my book How To Figure the Odds published by Doubleday and Co. in 1946....

I would not bother you with this letter if it were not for the fact that I am very jealous of my reputation for mathematical accuracy and I do not like any of your readers to think that I concurred in this error. I should have written the minute I saw the original article, but I failed to realize the fact that you have so many readers who are able to spot such things instantly, and I did not want to make a mountain out of a molehill.

Incidentally, let me congratulate you again on your most interesting magazine. I am sure that your reporter's use of "Oswald Jacoby concurred" was meant for the fact that I concurred that the cards had not been shuffled and certainly the article as a whole is a magnificent job.
OSWALD JACOBY
Dallas, Texas

•Bridge Master Jacoby's mathematical reputation remains untarnished.—ED.

EAST VS. WEST
Sirs:
Your incisive report on National Ski Association director's war was commendable for its grasp of a situation which until now has been only a rising ground swell among those familiar with siding's management.

You presented the main clue to the unpleasant situation of confusion now developing when, in your interview with Mr. Sigal, he revealed his basic thinking by stating, "We don't need the East."... Nowadays the voting strength of the East is about one-third the total.

If Mr. Sigal is to have his way he has only to line up the entire West against the East. Strangely, however, there are many ski association people in the West who are more responsible in their appreciation of national skiing problems than Mr. Sigal appears to be and who can tip his apple cart. Further research into this controversy will reveal that even now gloom has risen over his western-only horizon.

Most contrasting is the fact that the Eastern group does not feel that it and the national ski sport can get along without the West.
EDWARD C. NEWELL
Boston

ARE THEY NOT NORTH AMERICAN?
SIRS:
SURPRISED IN VIEW OF CANADIAN CIRCULATION NO MENTION OF BOWDEN AND DA-FOE WHO WON WORLD'S PAIR CHAMPIONSHIP FOR SECOND YEAR. EVEN IF U.S. PAIR WHO WERE FOURTH ARE OF INTEREST TO U.S. READERS THE WINNERS STILL WOULD HAVE BEEN NORTH AMERICAN.
W. P. GlLBRIDE
Toronto

•Herewith World Pair Champions.—ED.

PHOTOHAT TRICKSTER MEEKER PHOTOWHO WON? PHOTOSKY BLAZER EVANS PHOTOICEMAN COMETH PHOTOPETE CORBETT PHOTOJOCKEY HARTACK PHOTOCANADIANS DAFOE AND BOWDEN ILLUSTRATION"And hurry it up. I'm hungry."
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)