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The Question: Is there such a thing as a 100% honest golfer? (asked at Palm Beach)

March 28, 1955
March 28, 1955

Table of Contents
March 28, 1955

Pat On The Back
  • A salute to some who have earned the good opinion of the world of sport, if not yet its tallest headlines

Table of Contents
Events & Discoveries
Golden Gloves
Athletes Vs. Altitude
  • At Mexico City, competitors in the Pan-American Games met an unexpected foe. In the rarefied air 7,600 feet above sea level, they are being felled by anoxia

Sport In Art
Bowling
Horses
Big Business
Boating
Motor Sports
Snow Patrol
Fisherman's Calendar
Acknowledgments
Tip From The Top
Tennis
  • By William F. Talbert

    There are signs that tennis may be breaking out of Forest Hills

Anniversary
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

The Question: Is there such a thing as a 100% honest golfer? (asked at Palm Beach)

ROBERT J. SWEENY, London and Palm Beach
Golfer:
"I've never played against anyone who deliberately cheated. However, there are few amateur golfers in amateur tournaments. That's not 100% honest. Two former pros, Chuck Kocsis and Ted Bishop, have played in the amateur Walker Cup. But Britishers are true amateurs."

This is an article from the March 28, 1955 issue

E. F. HUTTON, Westbury, N.Y.
Investment Banker:
"I feel that I'm a 100% honest golfer. But I have my doubts about my opponents. That's because I'm naturally opposed to them. Let's put it this way: After many years of playing golf on many golf links, I'm convinced that there are no such people as 100% honest, golfers, only 100% honest politicians."

TED BISHOP, Norfolk, Mass.
Former National Amateur Champion:
"Yes, in tournament golf. You can't be anything but 100% honest. Too many are watching and they keep score for you. But outside the tournaments, the stories you hear at the 19th hole are out of The Arabian Nights. I wouldn't call them dishonest, exactly. They're like fish stories."

MRS. GREGG DODGE, Detroit
Housewife:
"I don't think there's such a thing as a 100% honest man—period."

JIM McHALE, Philadelphia
Two-time Member, Walker Cup team:
"The average golfer—I was one before playing tournament golf—doesn't hesitate to improve his lie and forget an occasional stroke. I got so that I'd never argue about another guy's handicap. In fact, I never met a golfer who admitted he could play to his handicap."

COUNTESS ELSA FILIPONI, New York and Naples:
"Yes, but you have to look for them. Unlike Diogenes, you should be able to find a 100% honest golfer once out of four tries without using a lamp. That's similar to everyday life, but people shy away from the thought. I married four times. I finally found an honest man on the fourth try."

LERAY W. BERDEAU, Palm Beach
Chairman, Everglades Golf Club:
"That's open to debate, particularly when you try to excavate or dig out individual handicaps. Every golfer knows the feeling behind the question, 'What's your handicap?' If there's a golfer anywhere who will answer that question truthfully, I have yet to meet him. Me? Mine is 25."

DR. CHARLES CROCKER, San Francisco
Executive Secretary, Pan American Medical Assn.:
"There's no question but that golf brings out the worst in people. Men break their clubs or throw them away. I've actually seen a frustrated golfer throw his clubs into the Pacific. They want to be 100% honest but with such a strain on their nerves, you have to be tolerant."

MRS. MURIEL FILER, Havana and New York
Housewife:
"I knew one. The Palm Beach newspapers printed his obituary. He reached in the cup for his ball. A snake bit him and he died before medical aid arrived. There went the last honest golfer. Now I suppose my husband's friends will say: 'No wonder Bill Filer wins so much money playing golf.' "

J. LESTER EISNER, Palm Beach
Retired:
"When he starts out, yes. Then he learns the dodges. He'll ground his club in the sand trap but won't take the penalty. When keeping his own score he may fool himself. If he improves his lie slightly, that's all in fun. But once at the top of his game, he is quick to note these deviations in others."

J. K. WILLIAMSON, Palm Beach
Lawyer:
"Certainly, at least 99½% honest. I know a ball is often picked up to identify it, a lie is improved because of grounds under repair or casual water, or one has to refer to the caddy for the total number of strokes. All this may be misunderstood but it is always in the interest and integrity of the game."

ILLUSTRATIONELEVEN PHOTOS

NEXT WEEK'S QUESTION:

How do you feel about the controversy between the skin-divers and conventional fishermen?