The Question: Women are not permitted to compete in national and international fishing tournaments. Should they be?

April 18, 1955

MRS. FREDERICK R. WEISSMAN, Palm Beach
Housewife
"No. In England it isn't cricket for a wife to call a club to see if her husband is there. It's his refuge. That's the way it should be. There's only one club like it in the U.S., the Whist Club in New York."

WALTER I. McDONOUGH, Booth Bay, Me.
Chairman, Atlantic
Tuna Tournament
"Certainly. I'm not responsible for this rule. Walter O'Malley had it passed when he was chairman. He browbeat me and made me stand up and be counted when the vote was taken. Ladies, write to him with your gripes. Address him in care of the Brooklyn Dodgers."

BILLIE BURKE, Palm Beach
Actress
"No. Men want to get away. Living and other conditions at sea are salty, to say the least. Women would be in the way. Men would have to cater to them. The women who insist they can compete with men in a tournament which takes days and requires a lot of stamina are just fooling themselves."

FLEET ADM. WILLIAM F. HALSEY, New York
USN, Ret.
"Do women really want to compete? Judging by the job our Navy Waves do, they'd be good competitors. But think it over, ladies. Take a tip from this old sailor. It gets mighty rough out there sometimes. I've been told that a seasick lady doesn't look too glamorous."

BARONESS HELENE DE GRANDCOURT, Paris and New York
Socialite
"No. Fishing is the men's last refuge. They want to get away from their wives. Can you blame them? A smart woman won't compete with a man. She'll build up his ego while remaining her sweet and feminine self. Women who catch the biggest fish are those who follow this philosophy."

COL. EDWARD L. AUSTIN, USA, New Haven
Professor of Military Science and Tactics, Yale University
"No. The long periods which these competitions require are not compatible with feminine charm. Imagine the language when someone loses a 600-pound tuna. It's no place for women when men reveal their basic character. Constant restraint on the men would make the fish laugh."

EUGENIE MARRON, Brielle, N.J.
Internationally famed angler
"Of course. Women welcome the battle of the sexes. Men don't. Can't you guess why? To protect male ego. To be beaten by a woman is unthinkable. In fishing that's a strong possibility. Women have a nice sense of rhythm and balance and a keen sensitivity in handling light or heavy tackle."

LUIS MUNOZ MARIN, San Juan
Governor of Puerto Rico
"Of course. In Puerto Rico women are expert fishermen. They add to the enjoyment of fishing. And they are sporting competitors. Alberto Bachman owns a tiny island here. His hobby is fishing, but his wife and daughter trim him regularly. Rather than tear his hair out he's proud of them."

JOHN B. MAHAFFEY, Springfield, Mo.
TV and radio producer
"Certainly. There's one big argument in their favor. A lot of men would be able to fish if their wives compete. And the fish would fight with each other for the privilege of biting at a charming woman's line. The outstanding angler in our town is a woman, Sylvie Eckbert."

DENNY CROWNINSHIELD, Manchester, Mass.
Nationally known fisherwoman
"Yes. Men like you to think that they want to get away from the telephone and their wives, but they're really afraid women will lick them at their own sport. Hooking a big fish takes a lot of luck. I admit it. A man won't. I landed an 882-pound tuna in an hour and 50 minutes. Sure I was lucky."

JOHN E. PEARSON, Riverside, Conn.
Company president
"Why not? I pride myself on being a pretty good fisherman. But my wife has it all over me. She's really an expert. A lot of men can take lessons from her. She caught the biggest blue marlin I ever saw, a 300-pounder. Prior to that she hooked the biggest goldfish on record—me."

ILLUSTRATION ELEVEN PHOTOS

NEXT WEEK'S QUESTION:

Where do you think your team will finish in the pennant race this year?

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)