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THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF SPORT

June 06, 1955
June 06, 1955

Table of Contents
June 6, 1955

Events & Discoveries
Spectacle
Indianapolis '500'
The Wonderful World Of Sport
Baseball
Anniversary
Track
Acknowledgments
Horses
  • HORSES 49

    NASHUA SET A NEW RECORD IN THE PREAKNESS BECAUSE AN OLD RIVAL NAMED SARATOGA DECIDED IT WAS FINALLY TIME TO "RUN HIS RACE"

Tennis
  • TENNIS 50
    By William F. Talbert

    CONTROVERSY HERE AND THERE: ON JACK KRAMER'S BLAST ABOUT MONEY-MAKING AMATEURS AND HOPMAN'S DAVIS CUP CAMPAIGN

Keep In The Pink
Fisherman's Calendar
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over
Pat On The Back

THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF SPORT

TRIPLE MIRACLE...TRIPLE PLAY...AND THREE FOR ARNIE SOWELL

This is an article from the June 6, 1955 issue

TRACK MASTERWORKS

It seemed so unbelievable, that race in London's White City Stadium. For the first time three men ran the same mile race in under four minutes: Laszlo Tabori (3:59), an airsick Hungarian; Chris Chataway (3:59.8), jovial British brewery salesman who feared he was not in shape, and Brian Hewson (3:59.8), RAF bombardier who had run the mile before only in club races. Hewson took the lead from Pacesetter Alan Gordon in the third lap, but Tabori took both him and Chataway on the final turn, won by seven feet. Chataway edged Hewson for second.

The doings in London took headlines away from Pitt's easy-striding Arnie Sowell who, for the third time outdoors (left), outran Fordham's Tom Courtney at IC4A meet in New York City.

A BONUS FOR TV'S MILLIONS
Last Saturday's game between the Brooklyn Dodgers and New York Giants was televised nationally. It was a fortunate choice, letting millions of viewers in on one of baseball's rarities—a triple play. The play developed in the fourth inning when the Dodgers' Jackie Robinson (above) hit a pop fly (circle) to short right field that looked like a sure hit. Giant Second Baseman Davey Williams raced back, got his glove on the ball (right), juggled and then held it. Dodger runners Gil Hodges at second and Carl Furillo at first were well on their way. Williams threw to Shortstop Al Dark to double Hodges off second. Dark's relay to first (below) caught a flabbergasted Furillo fully 10 feet off the bag. But for all their histrionics, the Giants lost the game 5-3, dropped the series, two games to one, and fell even farther (nine full games) behind the league-leading Dodgers.

ORDEALS OF WINNERS

Unwritten But Binding as any rule of sport is the winner's obligation to the crowd—his role, under camera fire, in the victory-circle tableau. Last week the ritual was performed in contrastingly separate fashions in Britain and the U.S. In the pearl-gray-topper world of Epsom Downs, a 3-year-old colt named Phil Drake won the 176th running of the famed Epsom Derby—great granddaddy of all derbies—and this brought to the winner's circle not only Phil Drake but his chic French owner, Mme. Suzy Volterra, widow of the late owner of the Folies Berg√®re. Mme. Volterra held Phil Drake's rein, posed for pictures, received a gold cup from Queen Elizabeth. In happy impromptu, the band struck up If You Knew Susie. Meanwhile, in the sport-shirt world of Catalina, Motorcyclist John McLaughlin won one of the races, found himself in the winner's circle with photographers, an admiring crowd and a pretty blonde in a bathing suit.

On Catalina Island off California, amid roars and choking exhaust fumes, motorcyclists get away at start of 60-mile race that preceded 100-mile Catalina Grand Prix.

Beaming winner, John McLaughlin of Duarte, Calif., poses with Margie Tenney, representing motorcycle manufacturer.

Shying politely, McLaughlin turns the left cheek as Margie moves in at photographers' request for more intimate pose.

At epsom downs Owner Mme. Suzy Volterra coaxes colt Phil Drake to pose for victory picture. Triumph was poignant one for Suzy, who lied to dying husband in 1949, told him his horse had won Derby. Actually it had lost in a photo finish.

Before victory Suzy smiles confidently, clutching mink, field glasses. Her horse, at 100-8, won with spurt in last 50 yards.

After victory Suzy raises gold winner's cup, which was presented to her by Queen Elizabeth, for a sip of champagne.

TRAPSHOOTING—DOWN WITH CLAY BIRDS

Trapshooting, or the art of taking pot shots at whizzing clay targets, comes on the costly side. Guns, ammunition, targets and club membership fees (there are few public trapshooting ranges in the U.S.) run to hundreds of dollars. Nonetheless, it is not only good out-of-season practice for duck shooting but a fine skill in itself, and there are more than 100,000 men and women in the U.S. who enjoy it. On New York's Travers Island recently, 143 of them fired freely at the National Clay Target Championships for Amateurs. Their ages ranged from early teens to late 70s, their costumes from informal" cardigans to elaborately festooned shooting jackets. There was even one competitor with the improbable name of Pearley Gates (Pearley had an off day, was not in ultimate contention). For three days the shooters blasted away, sending up an almost constant barrage of shotgun fire. The new champions: Mrs. Bonnie Jonas, 32-year-old mother of four from Philadelphia, and George Van Wyck, 60-year-old Nyack, N.Y. contractor.

Veteran trapshooter E. E. Gardner, 78, shot 89 out of 100, but lost the senior championship to 71-year-old J. J. McHale Sr., who scored a remarkable 96. Gardner was after his fifth title.

Smile of victory by vivacious Mrs. Bonnie Jonas, wife of a Philadelphia surgeon, comes after she won the women's title. This was her first major competition in 2½ years of trapshooting.

PHOTOHUNGARY'S LASZLO TABORI WINS HISTORIC MILE AT LONDON, BEATING CHRIS CHATAWAY (LEFT) AND BRIAN HEWSON. ALL BROKE FOUR MINUTESPHOTORUNNING EASILY, ARNIE SOWELL WHIPS TOM COURTNEY IN HALF-MILE RACE AT NEW YORKPHOTOROBINSON POPS BALL TO RIGHT FOR SEEMING HIT AND WILLIAMS (EXTREME LEFT) TAKES STEP BACK AS RUNNERS BREAK FROM FIRST AND SECONDTHREE PHOTOSGIANTS' WILLIAMS GLOVES BALL...JUGGLES...COCKS ARM FOR THROWPHOTO...AND TOSSES TO DARK (19) AT SECOND TO DOUBLE UP HODGES. DARK RELAYS TO FIRST IN TIME TO COMPLETE TRIPLE PLAY ON FURILLO (6)SIX PHOTOSPHOTOWILBERT H. BLANCHENEW MEN'S CHAMPION, GEORGE VAN WYCK, FIRED A PERFECT 100 OUT OF 100 TO COME FROM BEHIND AND WIN HIS FIRST MAJOR CHAMPIONSHIPPHOTOWILBERT H. BLANCHEW. C. LOBOMBARDE ADJUSTS GOOD LUCK TAM BEFORE FIRING ROUNDPHOTOWILBERT H. BLANCHEPEARLEY GATES AND RALPH BEVIS AWAIT THEIR TURNS AT THE TRAPSTWO PHOTOSWILBERT H. BLANCHE