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LEARNING TO SWIM IN THREE HOURS

July 11, 1955
July 11, 1955

Table of Contents
July 11, 1955

Events & Discoveries
Spectacle
  • A sailplane pilot soars through a wide, noiseless world, forever searching for the free power to keep him there

  • Flapping and flopping for a thousand years in imitation of eagles, crows, beetles and fish, man finally found his way into the air. In sailplanes he now flies well and high with very little fuss and no feathers at all

  • By William F. Talbert

    The U.S. Davis Cup captain, a Wimbledon witness, reveals the young Cincinnatian finally capturing the world's most coveted tennis title

The Wonderful World Of Sport
Anniversary
Sporting Look
All-Star Preview
Acknowledgments
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

LEARNING TO SWIM IN THREE HOURS

"Once a person is willing to put his face in the water and do the dead man's float, learning to swim is no problem," says Mrs. Phyl Williams (left) of Glens Falls, N.Y. To make her point, Mrs. Williams, who has taught 4,000 people to swim in the last 12 years, recently commandeered Ed and Jim Bagnell, 10-year-old identical twins neither of whom could swim a stroke. Using accepted Red Cross methods at a clinic for prospective water safety instructors at Brookline, N.H., Mrs. Williams condensed a normal six-hour instruction program, and in only three hours she had the Bagnell boys swimming 50 feet with acceptable overarm technique. The Red Cross hopes eventually to teach the rudiments of swimming to the estimated 90,000,000 Americans whose swimming is still not up to safety standards.

This is an article from the July 11, 1955 issue Original Layout

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