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The Question: Norbert L. Harms of St. Louis, in his answer to the Hotbox question, "Should women hunt?" said: "...basically, women are poor sports." Are they?

Aug. 01, 1955
Aug. 01, 1955

Table of Contents
Aug. 1, 1955

Events & Discoveries
Spectacle
Civil War In Virginia
The Wonderful World Of Sport
Sport In Art

The Question: Norbert L. Harms of St. Louis, in his answer to the Hotbox question, "Should women hunt?" said: "...basically, women are poor sports." Are they?

AVERY BRUNDAGE, Chicago
President, International Olympic Committee
"No. A great benefit derived from sport is the development of moral fiber and sportsmanship. Women have made considerable progress even though they are comparatively new in competitive sport. They've given us many athletes who are excellent exponents of true sportsmanship."

This is an article from the Aug. 1, 1955 issue

JOHN C. FISCHBECK, Honolulu
Manager, Royal Hawaiian Hotel
"No. And I'm competent to answer. I was purser of the S.S. Lurline for years, with plenty of chances to watch shipboard competitions. Webster defines sportswoman: 'One who in sports is fair and generous; a good loser and a graceful winner.' Women of my acquaintance have been all of this."

FURBER MARSHALL, Carlisle, Pa.
President, Carlisle Corp.
"Women sure are great sports. I wouldn't dare say anything but that. What do you want to do, ruin my marriage? My wife is the former Sarah Hall, who, in her high school days, was captain of the basketball team that won the Alabama state championship. As I said, women are great sports."

FAYE EMERSON, New Canaan, Conn.
Actress
"Give us a chance. Men weren't always good losers. It's taken generations of training. Some are still poor losers. Faking injury in football to stop the clock isn't sporting. Sure, some women lose poorly to each other, but they're the best losers to men. They've taken it on the chin for centuries."

THEODORE S. PETERSEN, San Francisco
President, Standard Oil Co. of California
"No. Women are wonderful sports. They assume most of the drudgery and the hard jobs while men go their merry way. They have to be good sports to take it. In competitive sports, no one likes to lose; but I've observed that women lose a bit more gracefully than men."

VINCENT AURIOL
Former President of France
"No. They are just as sportsmanlike as the men. My own daughter-in-law, Jacqueline, recently bettered the women's air-speed record—formerly held by Jacqueline Cochran—flying a French Mystere IV turbo-jet fighter. She is thoroughly sportsmanlike, as are all French women athletes."

LIEUT. RED GRAVE, Atlanta, Ga.
U.S. Navy
"Yes. A woman hates to lose and is overbearing when she wins. I've seen it in basketball. And I've read about Suzanne Lenglen quitting in the middle of a tennis match at Forest Hills when Molla Mallory, the American champion, took a set from her for the first time in two years of tournament play."

BABE DIDRIKSON, Tampa, Fla.
"No. I have never competed against a woman who showed poor sportsmanship. I have watched men in sports for a long time. They are not better sports than women. I should know because I've probably competed in all kinds of sports longer than any athlete, man or woman, living today."

WILLIAM M. WILSON, Huntington, N.Y.
Advertising Executive
"Yes. Their inherent jealousy of other women makes them poor sports. This permeates their thinking and shows in athletic contests. The green-eyed monster may permit a girl seemingly to congratulate an opponent, but inwardly she usually fumes and seethes."

FLORENCE SHIENTAG, New York
Former Justice of Domestic Relations Court
"Yes. Women are hard giver-uppers. Did you ever see women wrestlers when they get mad? And the girls in the roller-derbies? Sports teach generosity and good will toward opponents. That's the wonderful thing about athletics. They are the great levelers. Women are learning."

BRUCE BARTON, New York
Advertising executive
"Yes. At the finish of a recent women's golf match, I never saw such grim and unsmiling faces. Men have built codes of sportsmanship through generations of competition. But women will catch up. Those who have been competing the longest have already caught up."

ELEVEN PHOTOSILLUSTRATION

NEXT WEEK'S QUESTION:

Who is, or was, the toughest pitcher for you to hit?