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THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF SPORT

Aug. 08, 1955
Aug. 08, 1955

Table of Contents
Aug. 8, 1955

Events & Discoveries
Spectacle
  • A squadron of roaring hydroplanes and a couple of hot-tempered owners have stirred the Gold Cup city into a fever of excitement

Return Of The Jones Boy
Column Of The Week
Tip From The Top
Pulling The Longbow
Yesterday
  • In June 1899 my Grandpa, with an enthusiasm he soon lost, built a scow and took us boys on a river cruise. Poison ivy and rattlers in shore camp didn't bother us, but he gave up after stepping on a rusty nail

Acknowledgments
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over
Pat On The Back

THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF SPORT

CEREMONIES AT THE SHRINE

This is an article from the Aug. 8, 1955 issue Original Layout

Baseball pays tribute to six more of its alltime greats in the traditional manner—posting plaques in its Hall of Fame at Cooperstown, N.Y. to commemorate their deeds

Joe Dimaggio, 40, hit in record 56 consecutive games, batted .325 and produced 361 homers in 13 seasons with Yankees. DiMaggio has an interest in a San Francisco restaurant.

Ted Lyons, 54, won 260 games as a major league pitcher in 21 years with the Chicago White Sox after he was signed off the campus of Baylor University. Lyons is now a scout for the White Sox.

Ray Schalk, 62, was star catcher for the White Sox from 1912 to 1928 and caught 100 or more games 11 seasons in succession. He operates a bowling alley in Chicago today.

Frank (Home Run) Baker, 69, got nickname by winning two World Series games for Athletics against Giants with homers in 1911, hit 93 in 13 years to lead "dead ball" era. He is a farmer now.

Dazzy Vance, 62, fireballing Dodger right-hander, led National League in strikeouts seven straight years (1922-28) and won 197 big league games. Dazzy runs a fishing camp in Homosassa Springs, Fla.

Gabby Hartnett, 54, caught nearly 2,000 games in 19 years (1922-40) with Chicago Cubs, whom he also managed to a pennant. Like Schalk he owns bowling alley in Chicago.

U.S. STARS GET IN THE SWIM

National AAU championships at Los Angeles produce some record times and encouraging prospects for next year's Olympic struggle

Breaststroke Ace Bob Mattson of North Carolina State churns homeward on final lap in the 200-meter event an easy winner. Mattson, who has recorded the fastest time this year for 200 yards, posted an American record—2:46.8—in the race.

Backstroke Star Yoshi Oyakawa, who already holds two world marks, was a double winner at Los Angeles. The talented Hawaiian took 200-meter backstroke in 2:26.1 to establish U.S. long course record, won at 100 meters in meet record time.

THE HORSY SET

FOR ADIOS HARRY: A WORLD RECORD
With Driver Morris MacDonald in the sulky, the fastest pacer in racing today sets a world mark of 3:04 2/5 in winning the 1½-mile Nassau Pace at Roosevelt Raceway, Westbury, N.Y.

FOR GREYHOUND: A BIRTHDAY PARTY
One of history's great trotters celebrates his 23rd birthday with cake, friends at Sportsman's Park, Cicero, Ill. Greyhound lives these days in an air-conditioned knotty-pine stall.

FOR NASHUA: AN EASY GALLOP
Loafing several furlongs with Exercise Boy William McCleary in the saddle, William Woodward's bay colt takes it easy at Saratoga, as he prepares for race with Swaps, August. 31.

FOR SWAPS: A TRAIN RIDE
Posing with Trainer Meshach Tenney, Rex Ellsworth's red chestnut colt stands in boxcar stall at Chicago where he will run in the American Derby, then duel with Nashua.

SIX PHOTOSRICHARD MEEKPHOTORICHARD MEEKTED WILLIAMS, BEST BET FOR HALL OF FAME AMONG ACTIVE PLAYERS, LISTENS TO HALL-OF-FAMER CY YOUNG, 88, BEFORE EXHIBITION GAMEPHOTOPHIL BATHBACKS ARCHED GRACEFULLY, A FIELD OF SEVEN PUSHES AWAY FROM STARTING BLOCKS AS GUN SOUNDS FOR BACKSTROKEPHOTOPHIL BATHDON HARPER WAS UPSET WINNER IN THREE-METER DIVETWO PHOTOSPHIL BATHFOUR PHOTOS