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TONY'S TROUBLE

Aug. 15, 1955
Aug. 15, 1955

Table of Contents
Aug. 15, 1955

26 Million Magazines Later
Events & Discoveries
Spectacle
The Gold Cup Race
The Wonderful World Of Sport
Physical Fitness
A Hotbox Special
SI Sampler
Anniversary
Tennis
  • By William F. Talbert

    At first a major concern, Trabert's injury now is just a minor part of the continuing Davis Cup nightmare

Belmonte
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over
Pat On The Back

TONY'S TROUBLE

At first a major concern, Trabert's injury now is just a minor part of the continuing Davis Cup nightmare

By William F. Talbert

The Pre-Davis Cup nightmare which started last week persists. In the Australian camp, Captain Harry Hopman benched troubled Lew Hoad and substituted Rex Hartwig who played five erratic sets before defeating Japan's Kosei Kamo in the inter-zone semifinals. In the Eastern grass court quarter-finals, Vic Seixas' game, which has consistently been off, went to pot. He was cleanly upset in two sets by the Texan, Sammy Giammalva, who after troubled years seems to be making his bid. Ham Richardson is still in his slump, and then from Tony Trabert's doctors came word that while his ailing shoulder was "nothing serious," he should skip playing Newport, R.I. this week.

This is an article from the Aug. 15, 1955 issue Original Layout

William White, SI's health writer, and Dr. Paul Peck, the magazine's medical illustrator, talked with Tony's specialists.

Here is White's report: As close as they can pinpoint it, Tony suffered a minute yet painful tear near the tendon which joins four shoulder muscles to the upper arm bone. To heal the tear, physiotherapists are applying wet hot packs and massage one hour each morning. To relieve the pain at the back and tip of the shoulder, doctors are using Novocain. This should have the shoulder fit (he runs daily to keep his legs in shape) for Tony to team up with Seixas to defend their national doubles title at Longwood, August 15.

Inside view of Trabert's right shoulder shows that the sore spot centers at the shoulder joint (circled) where the teres major muscle (l), teres minor muscle (2), infraspinatus muscle (3) and supraspinatus muscle (4) attach around the greater tuberosity (5) of the humerus or upper arm bone. The muscle tear, so slight that it cannot be seen by the naked eye, lies in the region of the attachment. These four muscles regulate the rotation of the arm; highly developed in Trabert's case, they control his overpowering service and overhead game.

ILLUSTRATIONBACK VIEW
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ILLUSTRATIONSIDE VIEW
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