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19th HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

Sept. 26, 1955
Sept. 26, 1955

Table of Contents
Sept. 26, 1955

Events & Discoveries
Spectacle
  • The blood quickens and the step becomes brisk. It's more than the winy air of fall. Next week is the World Series!

Preview: The World Series
Tarheel Triumph In The Old Dominion
The Wonderful World Of Sport
Football: Game Of The Week
Sporting Look
Sport In Art
Anniversary
Acknowledgments
Yesterday
  • In the throes of a pennant fight in 1934 the Tigers' great star, Hank Greenberg, wrestled with a problem of conscience. For the frenzied Detroit fans, the suspense was awful

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over
Pat On The Back

19th HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

QUESTION ANDANSWER
SIRS:
IN YOLK SEPT. 19 ISSUE JIMMY JEMAIL ASKED WHICH CHAMPION WOULD WIN IN AFREE-FOR-ALL, BOXER ROCKY MARCIANO OR WRESTLER LOU THESZ. THIS QUESTION CANDEFINITELY BE ANSWERED BY HAVING MARCIANO AND THESZ MEET. I PROPOSE TO PROMOTESUCH A MATCH AT THE COLISEUM IN HOUSTON WHERE I HAVE PROMOTED WRESTLING FOR THEPAST 35 YEARS. I WILL PAY ALL EXPENSES INCURRED IN SUCH PROMOTION AND WILLPERSONALLY POST A PURSE OF $25,000 FOR THE WINNER OF THE MATCH. IN ADDITION ALLPROCEEDS FROM THE GATE WILL BE DONATED TO THE BABE DIDRIKSON ZAHARIAS CANCERFUND. I HAVE ALREADY CONTACTED LOU THESZ AND HE IS NOT ONLY AGREEABLE BUTANXIOUS FOR THE CHANCE TO HAVE THIS QUESTION ANSWERED. IF THE MATCH CANNOT BEMADE UNTIL AFTER SEPT. 20 THESZ WILL MEET THE HEAVYWEIGHT BOXING CHAMPIONWHOEVER HE MAY BE.
MORRIS P. SIGEL
GULF ATHLETIC CLUB
HOUSTON, TEXAS

This is an article from the Sept. 26, 1955 issue

HELPLESSMARCIANO
Sirs:
I was amused by some of the answers to Jimmy Jemail's HOTBOX query, "CouldThesz beat Marciano in a free-for-all?" The question is a little likeasking, "Could a squash player beat a handball player?"

For all itsruggedness, boxing is a much-handicapped activity. The boxer must deliver hisblows a certain way, he can't seize an opponent's arm, tackle him, or use hislegs as offensive weapons. Defensively, he is accustomed to protecting himselfonly from the waist up. He is absolutely helpless once off his feet.

I don't doubtthat Marciano, who is the most wrestlerlike boxer since Tony Galento, wouldgive a good account of himself for a full second and a half. But then Thesz, orany good college middleweight for that matter, would either slip around behindhim or leg-dive him and that would be the end of Rocky.
REX LARDNER
New York

5 TO 1 ON LOU
Sirs:
I've been in quite a few arguments since Jimmy Jemail's HOTBOX (SI, Sept. 19).This is quite an interesting question. I think Thesz should win. So, somewrestlers are clowns but others aren't. The matches have to look interesting.That's what makes pro wrestling popular.

Rocky said,"Jimmy, why don't you and SI promote this fight?" etc. If there weresuch a fight, I'd give 5 to 1 odds on Lou Thesz winning it.
FREDERIC B. RODGERS
Slingerlands, N.Y.

PAIN IN THEFACE
Sirs:
I'd like to see it, but I don't think you'll ever get Marciano and Thesz in thesame ring. Each would rather keep on bragging that he would murder the otherone, and steer clear of the showdown.

But if it didhappen, I would put my money on Marciano. Answering Jimmy Jemail's question,Rocky said, "I'd bat his brains out." He would, too, and for once thepained look on a wrestler's face would be the real thing.
MORTON K. GAITHER
St. Louis

NO PUNCH LEFT
Sirs:
I notice the people answering Jemail's question are split 50-50, with one onthe fence with "that depends." Let me tilt the scales in favor of thewrestlers—Lou would win in a hurry. Let him get one hold on Rocky (he would,easily) and Mr. Marciano is through punching. It's been done before. Wrestlersmay go in for horseplay to entertain the customers but they're athletes, anddon't you or Marciano forget it.
EDWIN KRAMM
New York

MIXED CHORUS
Sirs:
It would be Marciano by a knockout in the first two minutes.
SIDNEY LATHAM
Pittsburgh

Sirs:
Thesz will win and maybe then wrestling will be taken a little more seriously,as it deserves to be.
JAMES M. DOYLE
Charleston, S.C.

Sirs:
Marciano is in for quite a surprise but, after all, he asked for it.
C. T. CRANE
Buffalo, N.Y.

Sirs:
It would be Rocky's easiest victory.
EDGAR DAWSON
Des Moines, Iowa

Sirs:
If it happens, I want to see it. And I can name you the winner right now,without waiting for the outcome of the match. The winner will be Lou Thesz.
DOROTHY MEADE
Indianapolis

•SI, madeco-promoter by Challenger Marciano, hopes to be at ringside for this oddcombo.—ED.

IN BATTLEJOINED
Sirs:
I am delighted to see another MATCHWIT SI, Sept. 12). My young son and youngerdaughter have very little in common at this stage and little to share in theirdifferent ways of life. MATCHWIT they both enjoyed so much and I am so gladthat you decided to go on with this wonderful puzzle.
MARION GRIFTLER
Asheville, N.C.

REVIVAL
Sirs:
At last! Having mourned the MATCHWIT as dead I sure am glad that you decided torevive the two-headed monster. "More, more," says the Jenkinsfamily.
P. ANN JENKINS
New York

THE WONDERFULWORLD OF WIVES
Sirs:
As my husband will morosely testify, for these past months' life, the wonderfulworld of sport and SI all lost their flavor because of the inexplicable andmalicious absence of my very own ewe-lamb : the MATCHWIT. What a pleasantsurprise, especially as it was totally unexpected, to find in the Sept. 12issue another challenge to my keen mind and hubby's plodding, overmatched graycells! I hope I have many more MATCHWITS to look forward to.
PHYLLIS KIRKLAND
Baltimore

•SI, proud of itsinvention of the MATCHWIT, will continue to match its readers' wits with itfrom time to time. Those who are eager for battle will be pleased to know thatSimon and Schuster published a brand-new collection of 30 MATCHWITS on Sept. 30(see below).—ED.

THE VIEW FROM NEWHAVEN
Sirs:
It's very sweet of Herman Hickman to pick Army as one of the 11 top teams (SI,Sept. 12) but what I fail to grasp is how anyone can compare Army's oppositionwith the opposition faced by teams such as Michigan. If Army played a few lessbreathers, like Columbia or Syracuse, I fail to see how they could rank thathigh.

I must admit I'mbitter. What Yale student isn't after seeing what happened to last year's goodseason? But that shouldn't detract from the facts. Army is in a position whereevery member of their team is on a full scholarship. It is just as easy tooffer a scholarship to a smart football player as a smart weakling. Also, Armyinvariably has a winning season because they play the Ivy League. Yet when this"great" team encounters Navy or Michigan they invariably get licked. Idon't decry Yale's team, we've got the best team in the Ivy League and willprove it, but I do say that I think if Army were to meet a few teams which werecloser to their calibre we might see just how good the Kaydets are.
EDWARD EASTON
New Haven, Conn.

THE HURRICANESEASON
Sirs:
Paste this in your hat—the Hurricanes of Miami—Number One in '55!
SGT. BURT SAPERSTEIN
Miami

•Hmm! GeorgiaTech 14; Miami 6.—ED.

I PREDICT
Sirs:
I enjoyed reading Herman Hickman's predictions for the forthcoming gridironseason. I was especially happy to see that Collins (Mike) Hagler was one of thepromising sophomores for the University of Iowa Hawkeyes. Because of hiseagerness and competitive spirit he is destined to become one of the college'sall-time greats.

Mike comes fromthe nation's capital, was an All-Metropolitan choice in 1953, his last year inattendance at Armstrong Technical High School. Armstrong has already producedLenny Ford of the Browns and Avatus Stone, who plays in the Canadian proleague. Mike has always played defense and offense. I predict that, besidesgetting his share of All-America notice, Collins Hagler will be the nation'soutstanding sophomore.
JAMES LUCAS
Albany, Ga.

HE STANDS FOR THEBEST
Sirs:
Thanks for the excellent character study of a very great leader, Bud Wilkinson,ex-Minnesota and ex-Syracuse (SI, Sept. 12).

Bud clearlydemonstrated his potentialities when a member of Ossie Solem's coaching staffat Syracuse for several years. We alumni who were privileged to have contactwith him then fully realize what an inspiring opportunity it is to the youngmen who play under the close supervision of this modest gentleman of soundjudgment. He stands for all that is best in sport.
WILLIAM H. EMERSON
Rochester, N.Y.

THE PHILOSOPHY OFA GENTLEMAN
Sirs:
I have just finished reading your splendid article on Bud Wilkinson.

As far as I know,this is the first published account of Mr. Wilkinson's philosophy of trainingyoung men. It gives an intimate insight into why he has been so successful atOklahoma University and why we of the Oklahoma alumni think so highly of him,not only as a coach but also as a fine gentleman.
WILLIAM H. HAUN
Wichita, Kan.

THIS LEADER
Sirs:
The President no doubt has in mind the type of leader personified by Wilkinsonconcerning his desire for a nationwide physical fitness program.
C. E. RHODES
Brookline, Mass.

SIMPLEREPORTING
Sirs:
I read Whitney Tower's Sept. 12 report on the Nashua-Swaps race and enjoyed theabundance of detail, all well expressed.

But my pleasurestopped when Tower abandoned reporting in favor of opinion. Personally I'm notat all interested when Tower confessed to me that, "Sadly, I have toconclude that he [Swaps] didn't like competition...." And I am annoyed whenhe pressures me "to conclude" something I haven't the faintest desireto conclude one way or another. Please stick to simple reporting.
PAUL SWENSSON
Managing Editor
The Minneapolis Tribune
Minneapolis

•One more readingis in order. Whitney Tower "confessed" nothing. He was quoting SI's LosAngeles correspondent, an expert observer, who had given his conclusion afterseeing the race on television.—ED.

THE SPIRIT OF THEMAN
Sirs:
It was gratifying to see the well-deserved tribute to Bobby Jones and hishistoric Grand Slam triumph (SI, Sept. 12, 19). I was playing at Royal Lythamand St. Anne's in the British Amateur this spring, and the first day there Ibegan to realize that the place was practically a living shrine to BobbyJones.

There is amagnificent picture in oil of him hanging in the clubroom. His mashie-iron withwhich he played a fabulous shot in the 1926 Open at St. Anne's is hanging onthe wall in the foyer. A large album containing the actual scorecards withJones's signatures and many photographs, mostly of him, is in a prominent placein the clubroom. Out on the course in a sand trap on the 17th hole is a plaqueof bronze, forever marking the spot from which the aforementioned shot wasplayed.

The members spokeof Jones as though he had played there at some very recent time, a true livingmemory. On reflection, I felt it was incredible that Bobby had actually playedand won his British Open there 29 years previously and at the tender age of 24years! What a magnificent spirit and personality this man must have had to havegenerated this kind of worship and reverence and to have had it last unchangedfor 29 years!
HENRY TIMBROOK
San Francisco

OUR ACTIVEREADERS
Sirs:
Congratulations on the Blue Jay article (SI, Aug. 29). Within the past few daysour firm of naval architects has received inquiries for kits and complete boatsfrom over 70 families from all over the country—a fine compliment to youractive readership. Though the class is still modest in size compared to ourLightning design, listing 380 boats as compared to over 6,000 Lightnings, ithas more than quadrupled its registration in the last two years. Twenty yachtclubs have officially adopted the Blue Jay for junior training and most of themset aside one or two, days a week for adult use, proving the boat's appeal as areal family sailer.

We want tocongratulate you on your complete sports coverage in general and on yachting,America's most popular participation sport, in particular.
ROBERT J. SPARKMAN
New York

OFFICE ROUTINE
Sirs:
A "pat on the back" is in order, I believe, for your staff ofimaginative and extremely able cartoonists.

Invariably I pinseveral of their products every week on the bulletin board in the large officewhere I work. Popular demand has grown to such an extent that I must continueor else.

So please tellyour cartoonists that my job depends on their continued excellent work.
BILL ARCHBOLD
Fulton, N.Y.

A DIFFERENCE OFOPINION?
Sirs:
This is not intended to call John Bentley to task; he is a tribute to the worldof motor sports. But did somebody goof, or is there a difference of opinionextant between the engineering division and technical publication department ofthe Triumph TR2 (SI, Aug. 29)?

A newsletter fromthe importers of the Triumph, dated August 1955, describes modifications to theLe Mans cars which included SU H6 carbs and disc brakes but not even a whisperconcerning a seven-gear overdrive transmission. The special factory supplementrelative to the Laycoek de Normanville overdrive states clearly, "Noprovision is made for overdriving any gear other than top gear, nor is itrecommended."
FRANK J. SALKOSKI
Fort Pierce, Fla.

•Up to July ofthis year the Lay-cock de Normanville overdrive available for the TR2 wasdesigned for use only off the top gear. However, the works car test-driven byJohn Bentley was equipped with the overdrive described in SI, which last monthbecame available on production models.—ED.

I DID IT
Sirs:
Thanks for that interesting do-it-yourself article on "How To Climb TheMatter-horn." I was so impressed that one week after I bought the July 25issue I did do it myself.
LT. THOMAS P. MCKENNA, USA
Nürnberg, Germany

KINGMAKERS
Sirs:
In your August 29 issue, some unkind person must have upset the checkerboard. Inotice in your column, OTHER RESULTS FOR THE RECORD, under "checkers"that Mr. Tinsley won by a 3-0 score in a 40-game match, with 35 games ending indraws. What happened to the other two games? Am I in your king row?
JOHN A. FERGUSON
Englewood, Colo.

•SI's king rowremains unthreatened. With Tinsley leading by three games and with only twogames to go, the match was closed since Hellman could not possibly win.—ED.

SURE THING?
Sirs:
What percentage would a marksman have to score on a minimum of 500 registeredtargets to be given a Grand American Handicap of only 19 feet as SI stated inits Sept. 5 issue? Perhaps I could make it at next year's Grand!
EDWIN E. ALSMAN
Rushville, Ind.

•At any rate Mr.Alsman is a more successful judge of distance than SI's myopic reporter, whomeant to say 19 yards.—ED.

GOLFMANSHIP ATCHEVY CHASE
Sirs:
Today was a turning point in my golf!

After buying yourmagazine (for the 57th time) I discovered the greatest article on defensivegolf I have ever read ("Golf: The Defense," E & D, Sept. 12).

Laden with threecopies of the piece I went out to the clubhouse. I thrust one in each of mypartners' golf bags and waited. On the first fairway the clipping wasdiscovered. First laughter and then the thought of their own mistakes came.Having the upper hand I, for once, helped my game; not by my score, as itstayed the same, but by their laughter, which did not help their accuracy.
L. MACKAY
Chevy Chase, Md.

WE TWO OUT OFHUNDREDS
Sirs:
My husband and I were thrilled with your article in the Sept. 5 issue on agreat sportsman—Cecil Smith.

We wereparticularly interested to note that he considered the 1949 match here with theArgentine team his greatest play. Perhaps Mr. Smith would be pleased to knowthat at least two—and there must be hundreds—of those who witnessed histremendous performance will never in their lives forget it.

I would rathersee that match replayed just as it was back in 1949 than attend the OlympicGames in Australia, all expenses paid.
LILIAN STEVENS
Los Angeles

PHOTOCOVER OF SIMON & SCHUSTER'S MATCHWIT PUZZLE BOOKILLUSTRATION"Knight to bishop four, check."THREE ILLUSTRATIONS