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THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF SPORT

Oct. 24, 1955
Oct. 24, 1955

Table of Contents
Oct. 24, 1955

Events & Discoveries
Spectacle
  • One man and a mean, squealing, kicking, twisting piece of sinewy horseflesh battle it out for supremacy at Tucson

The Pros Are Upside Down
The Wonderful World Of Sport
Weidman's Burden
Underwater
Sport In Art
  • Battered and weathered, the plain board door of Theodore Roosevelt's cabin in the Badlands of Dakota Territory in the '80s served as background for a painting

Acknowledgments
Preview
Yesterday
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over
Pat On The Back

THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF SPORT

BASKETBALL AT ST. PETER'S

This is an article from the Oct. 24, 1955 issue Original Layout

Pope Pius XII watches a demonstration of the game in the Vatican's famous square after addressing the crowd on the spirit of proper sportsmanship. 'To win,' the Pope said, 'is not so important as to prove one's skill and fortitude' (see also page 11).

Pope plus congratulates captain of winning basketball team on 10th anniversary of Italian sports movement he restored.

Throng of 80,000 also heard the Pope express his satisfaction that the 1960 summer Olympics will be held in "Christian Rome."

Italian sports center player tries a push shot as the Pope watches from elevated throne at main entrance to St. Peter's.

RED VERSION OF 'DAMN YANKEES'

Not to be outdone by U.S. showmen who turned their national game into a smash hit on Broadway, Soviet folk dancers, like the three butting an imaginary ball above, are wowing sophisticated Parisian audiences with a caricature of the U.S.S.R.'s favorite sport of soccer

Ballet begins as pompous officials march on the field

Soaring dancer viciously kicks the ball toward goal

Chasing ball, opposing players leap down the field

Desperation dive by the goalie results in vital save

KEEPING FIT IN PHILLY

Professor Thomas Cureton, the University of Illinois physical-fitness expert who has helped several of the world's outstanding athletes, tests a number of Philadelphia businessmen softened by office-chair squat

Abdominal muscles of Walter Lenhard, 41, vice president of Quaker City Life Insurance Co., are tested by having him blow into a tube hooked up to a column of mercury. Lenhard pushed mercury up to a fair 105 millimeters, but Cureton (left) told him to "do something more strenuous than volleyball."

Balance test finds Ralph Eaton poised on board running along floor of Central Branch YMCA. After tests were finished, Eaton groaned, "I play golf regularly and bowl once a week, but I didn't realize how little some of my muscles have been used."

Flexibility test shows Frank Peberdy, a purchasing agent for an engineering firm, to be above average. A diabetic, the 49-year-old Peberdy has reduced from 303 pounds to 278 by regular workouts at the Y on the recommendation of his doctor.

Heart test is administered to Ralph Eaton, 50, president of Lummis and Co., by Cureton, who found Eaton's pulse a bit below average. Cureton suggests gym work rather than sports because, as he puts it, "many sports are not pointed up to fitness."

Former athlete George H. Braceland, 42, vice president of printing firm, expected to do better than the slightly above average he made in tests. Once a semipro baseball and football player, Braceland now finds swimming to be his major exercise.

Spare tire on William Hamilton, dean of the Pierce Business School, undergoes scientific squeeze in fat-measurement test. Although two-thirds of the 70 men tested belonged to the Y, Cureton found the majority only average or below physically.

Tennis player William J. Clothier II, 39-year-old coal company executive, encountered little difficulty passing most of the tests. Despite Clothier's above-average performance Cureton still highly recommended an individual long-term calisthenic program.

SEVEN PHOTOSBERNIE CLEFFFIVE PHOTOSAL TAYLORTHREE PHOTOS