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MEMO FROM THE PUBLISHER

Nov. 14, 1955
Nov. 14, 1955

Table of Contents
Nov. 14, 1955

Events & Discoveries
Spectacle
Yankees In Japan
The Wonderful World Of Sport
Conversation Piece:
Tip From The Top
Field Trials For Spaniels
Fisherman's Calendar
Acknowledgments
Yesterday
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over
Pat On The Back

MEMO FROM THE PUBLISHER

Chess, bird watching and the Olympic Fund may not appear at first glance to be closely related, but as I ran into them one day last week, they were. Each had a story to tell about what happens, as something so often does, when people read SPORTS ILLUSTRATED.

This is an article from the Nov. 14, 1955 issue

As for chess, the problem published in our article on Samuel Reshevsky (SI, Oct. 17) led to another problem when it came time to publish the solutions in the 19TH HOLE (Oct. 31). It seems that the teletypesetter who received the assignment to transmit the solutions to the printer refused outright to have anything to do with them. This was not, as it turned out, because of the eye-popping demands of the job (1 Kt-B6, K-Q3; 2 B-B2 etc., line after line), but because he had personally been wrestling with the brain twister ever since it appeared in SI and had no intention of taking the easy way out. His understanding boss obligingly passed the problem over to a non-chess man, and the last I heard our teletypesetter was still working on it.

In Fairfield, Iowa, Mrs. Lillian Walker has just finished working—on a quilt. Active and industrious at 85, she makes a lot of them. But her son, Wendell Walker of New York City, who sent me the accompanying photograph, told us that this was one of the most challenging patterns she ever tackled. I'm sorry that you can't see its color in this illustration, but if the quilt looks familiar, it's because it's a reproduction of our May 16 bird watchers' cover.

The Olympics came into it when I learned that we needed another printing of Happy Knoll Country Club membership cards. As you may recall, shortly after we first offered these cards, one reader suggested that we charge a $1 membership fee, the $1 to be contributed to the U.S. Olympic Fund. I'm happy to report that the wise and continuing response of our readers to the suggestion has already resulted in a considerable contribution to the fund, which is even more gratifying than the fact that Happy Knoll has undoubtedly become by far the largest country club in the world. And I should add that "memberships" of course are still open, at the same fee.

TWO ILLUSTRATIONS