THE INLAND WATERWAY: SEA ROAD SOUTH

Where to go, what time to leave, what to see on the way and what to do in the various ports along the 946.1-mile waterway between Norfolk and Miami
November 28, 1955

Beginning in the Elizabeth River at Norfolk, Va., an unbroken sequence of bays, rivers, inlets and canals called land Waterway (more formally the Intracoastal Waterway) stretches south to Miami. Starting from one point or the other a migrant yachts man can travel its entire length, rarely leaving salt water and never entering the unprotected ocean.

There is a popular belief—fostered in part by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, which maintains the waterway, and in part by a dim yachting tradition—that the waterway actually goes from New York City to Galveston, Texas. Someday this may be true. At the moment it is a harmless fantasy that ignores some 150 miles of open water on the west coast of Florida, a 26-mile stretch of ocean just south of New York, and a muddy nightmare known as the Jersey Waterway (see map).

From Norfolk to Miami, however, the waterway really exists, dredged to a mean low-water depth of eight feet to 12 feet, buoyed for boats heading in a southerly direction, and wide open to any boat owner who has the time, the money and an aversion to cold weather.

A fast (12-knot) power cruiser can make the trip in 10 days. Moving that quickly, however, is a mistake. Here is too much to see along the way, and there are too many places where it is fun to lay over for a day or two. Two weeks is a reasonable time to allow for fast boats; and in two weeks a sailboat with a good auxiliary motor can make the whole trip, moving every day but not getting in after sundown.

In spite of the number of boats that travel on the waterway each year (the Bahia Mar marina in Fort Lauderdale serviced more than 1,000 boats last year), a trip down the waterway is still a rather unique adventure. It keeps its originality for two reasons: 1) most waterway travelers are perennials—professional skippers delivering boats to absentee owners, charter-boat captains following the fishing seasons, and semiretired yachting migrants who live aboard their boats most of the year; 2) no two trips down the waterway are the same. With this in mind, SI presents on these and the following pages the first day-to-day guide to the Inland Waterway, noting what a traveler should look for and what he may expect—or be surprised—to find along the way.

NORTHERN APPROACHES TO THE INLAND WATERWAY

The coastal waters between New York and Norfolk are usually considered part of the Inland Waterway. Actually they are a jumble of mud banks, unpleasant or downright dangerous inlets, major shipping channels and open ocean. Boats heading south from New York have a 26-mile stretch of unprotected ocean from Sandy Hook to the first inlet at Manasquan—considered one of the two best inlets on the Jersey Coast but hazardous in a strong onshore wind. From there, shallow-draft boats (4 feet or less) can take the twisting, muddy Jersey Waterway to Cape May. Deeper boats stay outside, being careful to avoid the stoutly built fish traps that poke up all along the coast. From Cape May, seagoing powerboats and 30-foot-plus sailboats can make the 168-mile jump outside to Norfolk; but be sure to check weather first because there is nowhere to go in if there is a blow. The safe route from Cape May takes two or three days depending on speed of the boat. First leg goes up Delaware Bay, through the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal to Chesapeake City (74 miles) or to Annapolis (122 miles); then a rather pleasant run down the bay to Norfolk with a final stop-over for slow boats at town of Solomons.

THE WATERWAY—-DAY BY DAY

STARTING OFF
Best Dock in Norfolk at Norfolk Yacht and Country Club (clubhouse closed Mondays) on north bank Lafayette River just west of Hampton Boulevard Bridge; and this is the place to be in Norfolk. Water depth at gas pump is 20 feet at low tide, shelving to zero at water's edge. Yachts drawing 5½ feet tie up no more than half way in. Dockmaster on hand 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. six days a week for gas, diesel fuel, water, ice, shore power. Tide drop 3 feet. Dockage free first night, 5¢ per foot (minimum $2) succeeding nights. For your last-minute engine check phone MECHANIC Tyre Bain, available dawn to midnight; there is phone on dock and another inside main clubhouse. Full club privileges to yachtsmen with club affiliations include excellent dining room (coat and tie) with good food in $2 to $3 range, informal snack room bar (bring own bottle since Norfolk and points south to Florida are 3.2 towns), 15 rooms with bath, Thursday night buffet (until Dec. 7), with dancing 9 to 12, Saturdays 10 to 1. Club Commodore is John B. Maddrey, manager is William L. Halfacre. GROCERIES call Cavalier and they deliver to the boat. CHARTS and navigation books at W. T. Brownley or Eggleton and Co.; MARINE STORES at Paxton and Co. and they will deliver. BEST PUBLIC DOCK is Port Elco Hague Marina—quiet, well-managed, fully equipped and only six blocks from downtown Norfolk. FOR MAJOR REPAIRS try Virginia Boat and Yacht Service in West Norfolk, which has full dock service and is next door to Western Branch Diesel and Service (excellent mechanics) and Dunn's MARINE RAILWAY (handles boats up to 70 feet and 100 tons). SIGHTSEERS drive 20 miles northeast via Newport News ferry to Williamsburg (see map) or to Jamestown (first permanent English settlement in U.S.), or 17 miles to Yorktown (where Cornwallis surrendered). Hertz and Avis rental cars are available. HUNTERS try the Great Dismal Swamp for deer and bear, and contact H. L. Piggott, 205 Mill Road in Deep Creek, Va. He is secretary of Big Entry Deer Club, private club which frequently accepts guests (best contact man is Leo Ford, maintenance man at yacht club). For ducks and geese try Currituck Sound, 35 miles by road from Norfolk. Good guides are J. E. Barnes or E. E. Williams in Knott's Island. GOLFERS try the Ocean View golf course only 4 miles from yacht club; or Cavalier Yacht and Country Club course (open to guests at Cavalier Hotel in Virginia Beach—20 miles from Norfolk).

FIRST DAY
Leaving Norfolk head for Elizabeth City, N.C., 44.3 miles via Great Dismal Swamp Canal. WARNING—boats drawing 8 feet or more take alternate route through Virginia Cut to Coinjock, 43.3 miles from Norfolk. Leave no later than 9 a.m. to allow time for lockage and 6 mph speed limit in canal. First railroad drawbridge at south limit of Norfolk Navy Yard is notoriously slow opener. Be sure both spans of twin railroad-highway drawbridge just past red nun 34 south of Norfolk are open before you go through. Watch for logs and snags in the canal. Note that waterway channel markings in upper Pasquotank, as in many subsequent harbors, appear in reverse, i.e., black to starboard, red to port. So obey yellow Intracoastal Waterway triangles (starboard) and squares (port) painted on markers. BEST DOCK in Elizabeth City is Elizabeth City Shipyard on right-hand bank, one-fourth mile past highway bridge. Yard has room for 135 boats, with 20 feet of water in all slips and no tide. Dockage 3¢ per foot per day. Yard has full crew of three MECHANICS, four electricians, 100 carpenters, a huge machine shop and a MARINE RAILWAY to handle boats up to 200 feet. Yard crew on hand Monday to Friday 8 to 12 and 1 to 5, and docks have gas, diesel fuel, water, shore power and ice on call through the yard office. For dock service after hours see watchman in shed at gate. For repairs Saturday or Sunday phone Wilbur VanSant (manager of yard) at home, but be prepared to pay time and a half. Yard has lounge open 24 hours a day with wash rooms, showers, TV, lounge chairs, magazines and pay phone. For GROCERIES go six blocks to town for Colonial or P&Q supermarkets, or phone W. S. Jones for delivered groceries. LAUNDRY AND CLEANING through the yard office with 24-hour service. BEST RESTAURANT in town is The Circle (see map), a 25¢-per-person taxi ride (phone—DAY BY DAY Winslow taxi) for really superior steaks for $2. For quick lunch or breakfast, try Carolina Coffee Shop 6 blocks from dock. For SIGHT-SEERS Kitty Hawk (see map) is 45 miles by car from Elizabeth City, but this is really too far unless you make it a stop en route to SURF FISHING at Hatteras or Okracoke beaches for striper (best wait and surf fish out of Morehead City or Wrightsville Beach). DEEP SEA FISHERMEN (see map) telegraph 10 days ahead to Hatteras, N.C. to reserve boats of Ernal Foster, Clam Stowe or Edgar Styron for Gulf Stream fishing. HUNTING for ducks and geese on west shore of Currituck Sound, contact Guides Cecil, John and Woodrow Whitson through Currituck courthouse.

SECOND DAY
Leaving Elizabeth City, slow boats (7 knots) get under way by 6:30 a.m. to make next stop at Belhaven, N.C. (75.5 miles) by dark. WARNING—before leaving, check weather with CAA in Elizabeth City since route crosses Albemarle Sound, famous for sudden storms. Look for snags in lower Pasquotank and especially in Alligator River-Pungo River Canal. BEST DOCK in Belhaven is River Forest Manor, a hard right just inside Belhaven breakwater. Manor has room for 20 to 25 boats. There are 8 feet of water at pierhead and supposedly same depth all the way in; but don't expect more than 5½ feet in close. No tide but a northwest or southeast wind can change depth as much as a foot. Dockage is free first night if you gas up, otherwise 4¢ per foot. Three-man dock crew is on duty 6 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. but don't expect too much action before 6:45 a.m. Dock has gas, diesel, water, shore power and ice, and there is supposed to be a Bendix on the pier by Nov. 21. For dock service after hours, check watchmen or go to desk inside the Manor—the big white house at the end of the pier. Pay phone, free showers and lounge chairs inside the Manor. MECHANIC, electrician, or electronic repairs through the office by asking Axson Smith, owner of the Manor. MARINE RAILWAY at Chester Sawyer's, a half mile up Pantego Creek past the Manor. GROCERIES at Tarkington's or Johnston's Monday to Saturday, and both deliver. Nights and Sundays the Manor has groceries. LAUNDRY through Manor maids for 8-hour service. DRY CLEANING picked up by Belhaven Dry Cleaners for same-day service. BEST RESTAURANT in town is in Manor which serves breakfast at any hour, dinner till 8:30 p.m. Food is average. Very late arrivals can get snacks through Mr. Smith. Manor also has 25 rooms running from $4 to $12 if you want to spend night ashore. HUNTING is the thing to do in Belhaven and worth a day's layover. This is exceptionally good year for Canada geese (see map). Through package deal with the Manor, you can get room, board and a full day's goose, duck, deer or bear shooting for $19. Same arrangement for quail—$22. FISHING package deal for largemouth bass, pickerel, crappie, perch, etc. costs $17. Or you can fish off the Belhaven breakwater for nothing.

THIRD DAY
Leaving Belhaven, skippers of slow boats can have breakfast ashore, leave at 8 a.m. and still make next stop at Morehead City, N.C. (58.6 miles) by 5 p.m. WARNING—light displacement motor cruisers consider laying over in Belhaven if wind is blowing strongly (25 plus) from south or southeast. Lower Pungo River and Neuse (pronounced noose) River can get steep and choppy in a blow. BEST DOCK in Morehead City is Morehead City Yacht Basin, a hard right before black can No. 1 on starboard hand just shy of the drawbridge. Dock has space for 40 boats (all in slips), but is often crowded. Late arrivals phone ahead (6-4146). Eight feet of water at the gas pump, 5 feet in shallowest slip and a 3½-foot tide. Dockage from $1 to $3 per day. Pier crew on duty 8 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Dock has gas, diesel, water, shore power. Ice by delivery, but not much after 5 p.m. unless you press point with Dock Manager Warren L. (Bump) Styron. For dock service after hours check the watchman. Pay phone, showers and rest rooms at end of pier. Five MECHANICS on hand 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. five days. See Styron to get mechanic Saturday or Sunday. Electrician through Styron, electronics next door to pier at Carteret Electronics. MARINE RAILWAYS at dock handle boats up to 140 feet. GROCERIES at Cherry's Market, and they deliver (owner available at store after hours). LAUNDRY AND DRY CLEANING at White Way Laundry. They deliver and will return morning laundry in late afternoon. BEST RESTAURANTS are Tony's Sanitary Fish Market or Capt. Bill's Waterfront Restaurant. GOLF at Morehead City Yacht and Country Club 3 miles from basin (open to yachtsmen living more than 50 miles from the city). HUNTING for deer and bear at Open Grounds Farm 20 miles northeast of town through guides John S. Mason (Beaufort 2-8536) or George Styron (Atlantic 312). For duck, try Guides Monroe, Tom or Luther Gaskill, or try Raymond or Eugene Styron—all on Cedar Island. FISHING, especially for striper on Core Bank from Drum Inlet to Cape Lookout, is worth extra day. Try Ace Harris or Earl Davis at Marshallburg for guide service. For DEEP SEA FISHING in Gulf Stream, many charter boats moored between Tony's and Capt. Bill's restaurants. Best are Hubert Fulcher's Blue Water, Willard Lewis's Gulf breeze, or any of Otis Purifoy's boats.

FOURTH DAY
Leaving Morehead City, slow boats shove off by 6:45 a.m. to make 67.4 miles to next stop at Wrightsville. WARNING—where waterway passes ocean inlets, viz. Bogue Inlet, New River Inlet, etc., watch for side currents throwing boat off course. Also look out for local fishermen in rowboats clogging channel through drawbridge at Wrightsville. BEST DOCK is Wrightsville Marina on left bank immediately past drawbridge, and single-screw boats be sure to make landing against the 1½-knot current. Marina has room for 65 boats (55 slips, others at pierhead). Fourteen feet of water at pierhead, 6 in shallowest slip and a 4-foot tide. Dockage 5¢ per foot per day. Dock crew on duty 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., and late arrivals try night watchman. Dock has gas, diesel, water, shore power and ice. Lounge with wash room and showers closes at 8 p.m. Five MECHANICS on hand 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. (Sundays and late hours phone Dock Manager Eugene A. Reynolds at home, Wilmington 3-1148.) Ditto electricians, carpenters, painters. MARINE RAILWAYS at marina handle boats up to 65 feet. GROCERIES from Rogers Grocery on Harbor Island, and they will deliver (Sundays phone 2280). LAUNDRY AND DRY CLEANING from New Way Cleaners and Laundry at Seagate for same-day service. BEST RESTAURANTS are Marina Restaurant just behind the dock and Faircloth's immediately across the bridge—both good on seafood (Marina is slightly more convenient), with steamed oysters a specialty. Wrightsville area is exceptional for SIGHT-SEERS, especially in springtime when local plantation gardens bloom. Airlee Plantation is only one-half mile from marina on west bank of waterway. Hire car or cab from Yellow Cab in Wilmington and drive to Orton Plantation on banks of Cape Fear River 24 miles from marina, Clarendon Plantation (18 miles) or Pleasant Oaks (20 miles). For fall sight-seers, in Wilmington itself are old buildings like St. James Church, Cornwallis House, Bellamy Mansion, etc. Also city-owned Greenfield Park and for north-bound boats the annual Azalea Festival the first week in April. GOLF at Cape Fear Country Club (see map), which honors other club memberships. This is where PGA holds annual Azalea Open in connection with spring festival. Or try Wilmington Municipal 5 miles from marina. FISHING in surf for striper miles away on beach. Or hire charter boats at marina to get other good striper fishing at Shell Island, Mason's Island and Elmore's Island. Same boats will go to Gulf Stream for marlin, sailfish (142 sails caught off Wrightsville last year), or stop in inlets for striper. Eddy Hanneman in Wrightsville Beach also charters, as does D. M. George in Wilmington—either of these will take parties for full day or half day.

FIFTH DAY
Leaving Wrightsville, slow boats on tight schedule start at 6:15 a.m., stock up on food and aim for Bucksport, 81.6 miles. Try to leave at dead low tide to ride current through sounds and down Cape Fear River. Boats drawing 5½ feet or less, with speed to make long jump to Charleston following day, head for Briarcliffe Yacht Basin near Myrtle Beach, 21 miles north of Bucksport. WARNING—watch for snags in 23-mile cut between Little River and Socastee Bridge. BEST DOCK, in fact only dock, in Bucksport is Bucksport Marina, on right bank just past red flasher 36. Slightly ramshackle dock holds 30 boats, with 15 feet of water at gas pumps, 6 feet at far end of pier. Tide changes 3 feet. Dockage 3¢ per foot per day. Dock crew oh duty 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. and late arrivals call night watchman on house-boat by store. Dock has gas, diesel, water, shore power and ice. Lounge on dock has rest rooms, showers, chairs, magazines, TV. MECHANIC on duty 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., and after hours rout out marina Owner J. P. Kittrell in two-story white house, 100 yards behind the dock. Electrician through Kittrell. MARINE RAILWAY at the dock hauls boats up to 60 feet. Some GROCERIES at marina, or Kittrell will drive you 3 miles to C. O. Marsh's. Give LAUNDRY AND DRY CLEANING to Kittrell to take to Conway for 24-hour service. Since nearest local restaurant definitely not worth the $6 cab ride, eat dinner on the boat. At Myrtle Beach try GOLF at Pine Lakes International Country Club (which also offers rooms at $6 to $14). Also excellent golf at The Dunes Golf and Beach Club, most convenient for guests at Dunes Village motel (rooms from $6 to $15. 6 miles north). Good RESTAURANTS are the Pink House (buffet), the White Heron or the Pinewood. FISHING off three jetties good, but the word in Myrtle Beach is relaxation.

SIXTH DAY
Leaving Bucksport, slow boats get away by 6:15 a.m. to make 78.6-mile jump to Charleston. BEST DOCK in Charleston is the Charleston Municipal Yacht Basin, a hard right at red blinker immediately beyond red nun 4. Enter basin very slowly and look out for rusting, tumbledown iron bulkhead on left as you turn into basin. Marina has room for 150 boats, but space at pier is limited so phone ahead (unlisted number is 3-5737 and ask for Manager Moultrie Ball). Eight feet of water in all slips at low water, tide drops 5 feet and boats drawing 7½ feet leave on the half tide or better. Dockage costs 4¢ per foot per day. Dock crew on 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., Ball stays till 7, and later arrivals ask watchman for service. Marina has gas, diesel, water, shore power at 50¢ a night and ice. Shower and lounge next door at Charleston Yacht Club. MECHANICS at head of pier from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. during week, and Ball may be able to get one Saturday and Sunday at time and a half. Electrician through Ball, but no work Saturday p.m. or Sunday. Electronics same. MARINE RAILWAYS at Mt. Pleasant Boat Building Co. handle boats up to 110 feet. GROCERIES (fancy) from Harold's Cabin, and they deliver; or try Rodenberg's Supermarket 4 blocks from marina. LAUNDRY AND DRY CLEANING notify marina office for 24-hour service. RESTAURANTS and HOTELS in Charleston are superb. And this, for southbound boats, is first real oasis due largely to Charleston's genteel disregard of state liquor laws. For dinner, try Perditas and order she-crab soup and broiled softshell crab. Try informal lunch at Harold's Cabin. Fort Sumter Hotel (rooms $4.50 to $20) and Francis Marion Hotel ($5 to $24.50) offer superior accommodations. Fort Sumter's Manager Don Grady is chairman for Advertising and Promotion Committee of local chamber of commerce and good man to check on Charleston activities. SIGHT-SEEING is perhaps best on waterway, and tours are arranged by the hotels. Includes Fort Sumter, St. Michael's Church (built 1752), Old Powder Magazine (Revolutionary War), St. Andrews Church (1706), Sword Gate House (antebellum wrought iron), etc. Boats heading north in spring don't miss Magnolia Gardens, or Middleton and Cypress gardens. Also fine sight-seeing walking down High Battery where waterfront lined with old houses, or try taking horse-carriage ride through old section of town. FISHING for largemouth bass and fresh-water striper is excellent in Santee-Cooper Lakes; or for weakfish, channel bass, king mackerel, bluefish and Spanish mackerel from Charleston jetties. There is some deer and turkey HUNTING if you want to scramble, and GOLF is good at Charleston Country Club or Charleston Municipal.

SEVENTH DAY
Leaving Charleston try to shove off 1½ hours before low ebb to catch strong tidal currents along 59.5-mile run to Beaufort (pronounced Byewfutt). WARNING—there are four slow, hand-operated drawbridges (plus two mechanical bridges) between Charleston and Beaufort. Approach slowly and have small anchor made up ready to heave off stern for extra-quick stop, in case bridge is extra slow. Channel twists, turns so often and so sharply that next mark you see ahead may not be the one to head for. Moral: keep close check on charts. BEST DOCK in Beaufort is combination of Beaufort Municipal Dock (no fuel) and Gulf Dock, hard right past Beaufort drawbridge. Gas up at Gulf Dock, then move to Municipal. Line-handling by dock crew here is likely to be sloppy, and there is strong eddy off Gulf Dock at flood tide, so watch your landing. Combined docks hold 14 boats. There are 15 feet at the gas pumps, 3 feet on inside of Municipal Dock. Normal tide drops 6 feet, and new-moon spring tides drop 9, so leave slack on bow and stern lines, and use plenty of springs and fenders. Dockage minimum $1 a boat, 2¢ per foot over 50 feet. Dock crew on 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., then phone Manager Arthur Green at home. Gulf Dock has gas and diesel, both docks have water, shore power and ice. Municipal has showers and lounge open 24 hours. MECHANIC Willy Yeomans available any time at 716-J. Electrician through Green. No electronic service. MARINE RAILWAY across river at Beaufort Boat Works takes boats up to 60 feet. GROCERIES one block from marina at Piggly Wiggly or A&P, or Woods Supermarket for dockside delivery. LAUNDRY and DRY CLEANING through City Laundry and Dry Cleaning Service for 24-hour service and dockside delivery. BEST RESTAURANT is in Gold Eagle Hotel, but check meal schedule. Same hotel has pleasant rooms from $3.50 to $8. For quick, informal steak, however, try Al's Steak House. HUNTING for deer and dove is monopolized by private clubs; but see Al Wilhelm at Al's Steak House for best local introductions. For quail, duck or turkey (at $100 a day) wire Fred Hack at Hilton Head Island; for quail also try G. B. Schurmeier at Land's End Plantation on St. Helena Island, or Richard Rowland at Tidal Home guest house. Local FISHING for drum, cobia, sea bass, sea trout, small and largemouth bass, bream and redfish; see Al Wilhelm or N. W. (Toots) Martin at Harvey's Barber Shop. GOLF at Ladies Island Country Club 5 miles from marina.

EIGHTH DAY
Leaving Beaufort, you have time for breakfast ashore (Ocean View Cafe half a block from marina). This is easiest day of entire trip. Shove off at 9:30 or 10 a.m. for 46.4-mile hop to Isle of Hope. WARNING—buoys in lower Beaufort River and Port Royal Sound are widely spaced. Check chart carefully and do not cut across shoals south and east of Parris Island. In upper Wilmington River just north of Causton Bluff, black range 23 and red range 24 are set back in bushes and hard to see against morning sun. BEST DOCK at Isle of Hope is Brady Boat Works. Some boats, however, pick Thunderbolt Yaqht Basin 12 miles north of Brady's. Thunderbolt has room for 23 boats, 18 feet at pump and 18 feet in slips, full dock service for gas, diesel, water, shore power, ice on 10-minute call, a good lounge with showers, a far bigger MARINE RAILWAY (111-foot capacity) than Brady, and is 4 miles closer to Savannah. But Brady has excellent dock crew and plenty of float space—essential in area of 8-foot tides. Brady's holds 48 boats, has 15 feet at pumps, 7 in shallowest slip. Gas, diesel, water, shore power, ice at the dock. Dockage $1 if you gas up, otherwise $2 up to 50 feet, $3 to $4 over 50 feet. Line crew on 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., after 7 go to Mr. Brady's two-story, white house at end of pier, or phone him (8349) from pay booth on dock. Marina has shower but no rest rooms. Two MECHANICS on 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. six days a week. After hours see Brady. Ditto electricians. Electronics call James Ryals (Savannah 4-5177) anytime. Four MARINE RAILWAYS take boats from 28 to 50 feet. GROCERIES at Smith's Groceries half a block to the right, seven days a week. Shopping center 5 miles away at Remler's Corner (call Yellow Cab from Savannah or take Savannah bus) has two supermarkets (A&P and Colonial), and LAUNDRY and DRY CLEANING—also a self-service laundry—at C&D Cleaners. BEST RESTAURANTS near marina are Johnny Harris (dancing) 6 miles away on Victory Drive and Our House in Remler's Corner area. In Savannah (8 miles) most fun is Pirate's House—waitresses in pirate costume and cannon balls in the yard, with good steak and drinks. The Rex (somewhat fancy) also good; and the Savannah Yacht and Country Club (no gas, tiny dock but good food) welcomes visiting yachtsmen. BEST HOTEL for weekending is plush General Oglethorpe ($9 to $17) 6 miles east of Savannah on Route 80, offering outdoor pool (chilly this time of year but fine in spring), 18-hole golf course, riding, candlelit dinners and dancing. Oglethorpe guests may want to rent car from Avis or Hertz. In town try the Manger (hard g) at $4.50 to $10, or the DeSoto ($5 up). Other GOLF courses at Savannah Golf Club (if you know somebody) or at Bacon Park (public) 3 miles from Brady's. For SIGHT-SEEING go to Low House, Owens-Thomas House, others for fine displays of antiques, or go antique-buying instead (see map). HUNTING for quail or dove very good this year at John C. Coleman Hotel at Swainsboro 90 miles west of Savannah by rented car ($15 buys room, guide and dogs). GOOD FISHING for cobia and weakfish near Savannah, and for latest local information check Otis Stubbs at Stubbs Hardware Co. (phone 5149) or at home (phone 3-5008).

NINTH DAY
Leaving Isle Of Hope, slow boats get off by 6:15 a.m. to make 74.7 miles to next stop at St. Simon's Mills. Tide is no factor in determining departure time from Brady's, since current changes direction nine times en route to St. Simon's. WARNING—there are no regular gas facilities from Isle of Hope to St. Simon's, so low-capacity auxiliaries take on extra 5-gallon cans. Watch your turn coming out of Little Mud River and keep good line on stern range 196. Also keep sharp eye for ranges set back in bushes along edge of Buttermilk Sound. BEST DOCK at St. Simon's is Olsen's Yacht Yard on starboard hand just past Frederica River draw. Room for 40 boats, with 18 feet all around the dock. Tide drops 8 feet, but all boats are secured to floats except at pierhead and in slips on north end of pier where you have to bridle out. Olsen has gas, diesel, water, shore power and ice. Dockage from $1 to $2. Pier man on 24 hours. If not on dock, check house back of boat yard. Office building at pier end has shower, rest rooms, lounge. MECHANIC comes on 5:30 p.m. and works till boats are finished. If not on hand, phone Olsen at one of numbers posted in lounge. MARINE RAILWAY at yard handles boats up to 60 feet. GROCERIES delivered by Brooks Quality Food Store on Sea Island Road (phone 3951), and they are closed half day Thursdays. LAUNDRY slow (48 hours) from Universal Laundry and Dry Cleaning in Brunswick, and they deliver at the dock. DRY CLEANING with 24-hour service, and Village Wash-O-Mat 2 miles away in St. Simon's Village; Yard Owners Olaf Olsen Sr. and Jr. will drive you in if you're stuck, or call Island Taxi (9451). BEST RESTAURANT for quick, easy dinner is Sea Island Yacht Club across bridge from Olsen's, (they also have dock with gas, diesel, etc., but no floats), and they will pick you up. For seafood, try Deck Restaurant in Brunswick which also transports guests. Nontransporter but purveyor of best steak on St. Simon's Island is Frederica Yacht Club 8 miles from marina. THE THING TO DO if you have the time and the money ($18 to $38 per day, American plan) is to spend a few days at The Cloister hotel on Sea Island 6 miles from Olsen's. This is one of Atlantic coast's truly fine watering places, featuring fancy beach club with kidney-shaped swimming pool (surf here is muddy and mild), horseback riding on beach, buffet luncheons, excellent golf course, skeet shooting, fishing, marsh-hen hunting, sight-seeing tours (ancient battle fields). Not quite so fancy is King and Prince Hotel on St. Simon's Island beach. Other GOLF at Brunswick Country Club 10 miles from Olsen's. Car rentals through The Cloister but phone at least three days ahead. Other FISHING through R. A. Taylor on St. Simon's (phone 4552) at $15 to $20 per day for rod, boat, motor, guide; and you can go for half a day.

TENTH DAY

Leaving St. Simon's, slow boats can push off at 7 a.m., make the 62.7 miles to Jacksonville Beach before sundown. WARNING—watch for dangerously strong currents 3.7 miles south of St. John's River, where rip tide goes through Atlantic Boulevard span at 6 knots. Auxiliaries and small single-screw powerboats wait for slack tide. Twin-screw boats coming downtide advance very slowly and blow horn. When span is fully open, run through at nearly full power; coming uptide enter as close as possible to dead center, with engines at full. BEST DOCK is El Verde Yacht Basin and Club on east bank just past second draw, south of St. John's River. (Outboarders and small inboard cruisers try Beach Marine Service just north of bridge. Beach Marine has gas, diesel, water and ice on 10-minute call. Service is good, but basin is not fully completed and space for big cruisers and auxiliaries is limited.) Pulling into El Verde be sure to land upcurrent as per instructions of owner and dock man, A.C.J. Mayer. Basin has room for 30 boats, with 12 feet all through the basin. Tide drops 2½ feet. Mayer open for business 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. and available after hours in his room over club-house at end of pier. Dock has gas, diesel, water, shore power and ice on call. Dockage 4¢ per foot. MECHANIC and electrician on call from J. F. Bellinger and Sons at Atlantic Boulevard Monday to Friday, and other days ask Mayer (Beach Marine has Mechanic-Electrician Johnny Moore on hand all the time). MARINE RAILWAY at Bellinger's takes boats up to 110 feet (Beach Marine has lift for boats 32 feet). GROCERIES from Banner Supermarket on Jacksonville Beach, and they deliver. LAUNDRY and DRY CLEANING at Beach Laundry and Dry Cleaners for 24-hour service, and they also deliver. BEST RESTAURANT for quick meals is the Homestead one-fourth mile up beach road from marina; but if you're tired, phone the Surfmaid which delivers hot meals like chicken in a basket to the dock. Dinner dancing at Le Chateau on Atlantic Beach 6 miles from marina is worth a try (call Beach Yellow Cab, or hire car in Jacksonville from Avis, Hertz or National). Some entertainment in Jacksonville (like Rainbow Room at George Washington Hotel). But best move, especially for yachtsmen-golfers with extra day or two, is stay at the Inn ($17 to $32, American plan) or The Innlet ($5 to $11.50, European) in Ponte Vedra Beach 7 miles from marina. Eighteen hole GOLF course available to Inn and Innlet guests is one of best in Florida. Other golf at Jacksonville Municipal course 25 miles from marina. Good fresh-water FISHING for schooling bass, bream and crappie in St. John's River. For latest local fishing information call Harry Finkelstein's tackle store or The Sport Shop (both in Jacksonville).

Alternate stopover between Jacksonville Beach and next full day's run to Daytona Beach is St. Augustine, 26.5 miles from El Verde and worth a stop for sight-seeing. Slow boats leave El Verde by 7 a.m. to give fullest possible day in St. Augustine. BEST DOCK is City Yacht Pier on west bank immediately below Bridge of Lions draw. Make your landing against 3-knot current. Dock (currently under repair) holds 8 boats, with 15 feet of water at the pierhead, 3½ in shallowest slips. Tide drops 5 feet. Dock, open 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., has gas, diesel, water, shore power, ice on call. Dockage $1.25 up to 50 feet, $1.75 50 to 60 feet, $2 over 60 feet. Dock has shower and rest rooms. MECHANIC on call through Manager J. L. McDaniel. Nearest MARINE RAILWAY at George's Marine Shop 2 miles up San Sebastian River holds boats up to 60 feet. Dock is right in middle of town, but GROCERIES will be delivered if you call S. A. Snyder or Weinstein's. LAUNDRY and DRY CLEANING also delivered by St. Augustine Soft-water Laundry with same-day service if you give it to them by 9. BEST RESTAURANT for quick early lunch is Blue Bay across the street. Then start on SIGHT-SEEING tour of St. Augustine, which is oldest permanent white settlement in U.S. Tours are arranged by St. Augustine Trains (motor-drawn) at $1.50 per person to see such sights as Fountain of Youth, The Old Slave Market, Mission of Nombre de Dios. If you want to make it fast, call St. Augustine Transfer Co. for a limousine. Slower and more novel way is to hail a horse carriage ($2.50 per hour). Or you can save the money and just walk (2 blocks to Castillo de San Marcos, 3 blocks to oldest house in U.S.). Incurable GOLFERS may want to play a few quick holes at Ponce de Leon Golf Club 2½ miles north of marina and open to yachtsmen. FISHING for sailfish and tuna is good through such charterers as Captain George Maust (phone Valley 9-3401) or Captain Robert M. Brown (Valley 9-8881) for $36 to $45 per day for four people. But this is all-day proposition, and best plan for St. Augustine is to arrive early (about 10 a.m.), see the sights and shove off about 3:30 p.m. in order to spend night at Marineland 15.6 miles south. You will thus avoid spending night tied to exposed pierhead where 5-foot tide (no floats) and wash from local shrimp boats can chew up your woodwork.

Alternate stopover 29.6 miles north of Daytona Beach is Marineland—particularly for sight-seers. ONLY DOCK is the Marineland Dock on east bank just past white flasher 87. Pier has room for 10 boats, with 7 to 8 feet of water throughout basin. Tide drops 2½ feet. Dockmaster Barney Murphy lives on dock and is available after hours. Gas, diesel, water and shore power at pier, with dockage $1 minimum. Showers and rest rooms at Dolphin Restaurant open until 9 p.m. MECHANIC available through Murphy only in emergency; so this is not the place to break down, since nearest major repair facilities (including marine railways) are 15 miles away at St. Augustine. Light GROCERIES can be bought at the dock. No quick laundry or dry cleaning available. Boats on a schedule should plan to push off for Daytona in early afternoon. SIGHT-SEEING is the thing to do in Marineland, and the place to go is the huge Oceanarium (see map) 200 yards from dock. Oceanarium holds vast collection of saltwater fish (amber jack, tarpon, angelfish, shark, barracuda) visible through 300 portholes built into side of tank. Marineland open 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Feedings are at 11 a.m., 2 and 4 p.m. and after Dec. 1 added feeding hours at 10 a.m., 12:30 and 3 p.m. Trained porpoise act goes on at 9:30 and 11:30 a.m., 1:25 and 3:30 p.m.

ELEVENTH DAY
Leaving Jacksonville Beach for straight 71.7-mile run to Daytona Beach, slow boats get off by 6:15 a.m. (no stops at St. Augustine or Marineland). WARNING—there are four successive drawbridges (not counting span at Ormond Beach) crossing waterway in 2-mile stretch just off Daytona Beach. Do not shortcut out of channel by taking direct line from second span (Fairview Bridge) to third (Carlton-Blank Bridge). Stay in channel and best keep up to starboard markers to avoid shoaling east of fairway. BEST DOCK in Daytona, in fact best-managed marina with most superior repair facilities thus far on waterway, is Daytona Beach Boat Works, a right-angle turn below fourth bridge and immediately past black daymark 39. Many boats, especially small power cruisers, stay at Daytona Beach Municipal Yacht Basin (hard right just after fourth draw), which has room for 100 boats, 10 feet of water throughout basin with 7-foot entrance channel, full dock service, showers, a Bendix on the dock and is 2 to 3 blocks closer to shopping center. But Boat Works is worth a night's stay in itself, and their repair facilities are (repeat) superb. Boat Works has room for 150 yachts, but they are usually loaded with houseboats so try not to get in too late unless you want to nest. If you do get in after dark, turn off the waterway, then line up two green ranges in rear of basin. Eight feet of water throughout basin and only 10-inch tide. Dockmaster Jim Smith on hand 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. for gas, diesel, water, shore power and ice on 15-minute call. For service 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. call watchman by dialing 6421 on pay phone in lounge (small white building along pier). Dockage for transients free first night, after that 2¢ per foot in open, 3¢ under sheds. Full yard facilities open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. five days, with half day Saturday include MECHANICS, electricians, carpenters, riggers, sheet metal workers, welding and pipe men, painters, electronic experts, sailmakers and MARINE LIFT and RAILWAYS for boats up to 165 feet. Lounge with TV, magazines, chairs (very comfortable), open 24 hours, and attached luncheon room (open 8 a.m. to 7:30 p.m.) has really good, quick food. LAUNDRY and DRY CLEANING through dockmaster, and 8 a.m. clothes come back clean at 5 p.m. If determined to leave basin (or if staying at municipal dock), call Clinton taxi and ride three-fourths mile to Johnson's Coffee Shop, or for slightly quieter meal go 2¼ miles farther to Chez Bruchez. Boat Works also has guest cottages (twin beds, living room, kitchen and bath) over-looking harbor for $6 per day or $30 per week if your boat is being fixed. Beach at Daytona is one of longest and widest in world, but end of Nov. too late for sensible swimming. In spring, however, install yourself at Daytona Plaza Hotel ($6 to $16) 3 miles from basin. Lounge on beach all day, have cocktails across street in Seabreeze Manor, then dance in hotel's Ocean Room or hire car (Avis or Hertz) and go for drive on beach. GOLF at Ellinor Village Course or at Daytona Beach Golf and Country Club half a mile from boat works, or at Riviera Country Club 6 miles away—all open to visiting yachtsmen.

TWELFTH DAY

Leaving Daytona, shove off by 6:15 a.m. to make Eau Gallie (pronounced O'Galley), 73.5 miles away. BEST DOCK in Eau Gallie is Eau Gallie Yacht Basin, an extra-hard right at red flasher 2 below Eau Gallie, then follow port-hand daymarks into basin. There is room for 35 boats with 15 feet of water at the dock. Channel in, however, is dredged to only 8 feet. No tide. Dock crew on 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. After hours see Manager T. R. Whitehead in room over office. Dock has gas, diesel, water, shore power. Ice from 6 a.m. to 7 p.m. on dock, and afterward see Mr. Whitehead. This yard is miniature of Daytona Boat Works, i.e., they have everything, but on small scale. MECHANICS at yard 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. five days and till noon Saturday. After hours see Mr. Whitehead. Ditto electricians, carpenters, metal workers, painters, canvas workers. Electronics especially good here, MARINE RAILWAYS handle boats up to 85 feet. GROCERIES from Crew's Supermarket 2 blocks from marina on U.S. 1. LAUNDRY AND DRY CLEANING through Whitehead, 24-hour service. Best idea is to have dinner on boat, then sit on fantail and fish for nothing in particular in this quiet, pleasant little basin. Boats making long jump to West Palm Beach may want to bypass Eau Gallie for Indian River Marine Basin 4 miles farther south in Melbourne. Take an extra hard right at red nun 4, then up small 7-foot channel into basin. Get gas or diesel at dock on right; has room for 40 boats, 9 feet at pumps. MARINE RAILWAY for boats up to 50 feet. Then move to Melbourne City Dock 400 yards farther inside harbor. Dock takes 22 boats, water and shore power available. Dock is also block from shopping center and from Pickwick Tea Room (try the broiled pompano). Other good food at Marie's River View, a block from dock. Less than a block away is Havenaire Motel ($7 for double room), pleasant place to spend night ashore. However, Eau Gallie docking facilities are better.

Alternate stopover at Fort Pierce, 44.8 miles south of Eau Gallie (in case 12- to 13-hour run to West Palm Beach sounds too long to slow boaters) is one of top fishing spots on waterway. WARNING—bad tide rips through Fort Pierce Inlet carry across span of first drawbridge. Moral: hang back till the draw is wide open, then go through with plenty of power, favoring side from which current is flowing. BEST DOCK is Fort Pierce Yacht Basin, right-angle turn at red nun 2 just below second drawbridge. Basin holds 120 boats, with 8 feet all the way around (entrance channel dredged to 5½ feet). Tide drop is one foot. Dock crew on 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. for gas, water, shore power and ice. After hours, blow horn for attendant who is there 24 hours. Dockage 3¢ per foot per day. There are showers at end of dock. MECHANIC on call around the clock through dock man. Electrician same; electronics through Manager Joe Tierney. MARINE ELEVATOR takes boats up to 65 feet. GROCERIES at A&P 1½ blocks from marina and they deliver. LAUNDRY and DRY CLEANING at Warren's Laundry for 12-hour service. Ship Ahoy Restaurant at the basin is adequate for quick meals. However, Simonsen's on causeway one mile from basin (Fort Pierce Cab Co.) best bet for dinner ashore. SIGHT-SEEING worthwhile here but involves some heavy traveling. Seminole Indian reservations (see map) are 57 miles away on Lake Okeechobee. Rent car from Hertz. If traveling in outboard cruiser or inboard cruiser drawing 3½ feet or less, you can take extra two to three days and go to Okeechobee via the St. Lucie canal from Stuart, 20 miles south of Fort Pierce by water. Also might try McKee's Jungle Gardens (elephants, penguins, bobcats and vast botanical display) 14 miles down U.S. 1; but this is not a must. FISHING is the big attraction in Fort Pierce. Gulf Stream charter boats (try Capt. George Archer of the Victory Two or Capt. Walter Ergle of the City of Fort Pierce) at marina for $60 per day for six persons. Sea trout, channel bass in the Indian River section of waterway from Fort Pierce to Stuart. Boats and guides from Capt. Walter Cochrane at Ankona 8 miles south. Easiest (and least expensive) salt water fishing from Fort Pierce causeway. Fresh-water fish, especially bass in north branch of St. Lucie River and at Stuart 18 miles by car from Fort Pierce marina. Incidentally, Stuart has fairly good small-boat facilities at Anchorage Botel, and somewhat more spartan tie-ups for bigger boats at Stuart Marine Service and Gulf Dock.

THIRTEENTH DAY

Leaving Eau Gallie for straight run to West Palm Beach (no stops at Fort Pierce or Stuart), slow boats get under way by 5:30 a.m. This is longest single day on the waterway (95 miles), and although West Palm marinas are well lighted, it is never much fun coming into a new harbor after dark. BEST DOCK in West Palm Beach is the West Palm Beach Marina on west bank of waterway immediately below Flagler Memorial drawbridge. Basin holds 140 boats, with 13 feet of water at the pumps, but only 5 feet on far side of most southerly pier. Tide 2½ feet. Dockmaster Clay Caullett on hand 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. for gas, diesel. For fuel between 7 p.m. and 10 p.m. ask men in gas station at end of pier. Shore power and water costs 25¢ per day. Ice deliveries at 6:30 and 8 a.m., and Caullett keeps 500 pounds at the dock for emergencies. Dockage 3¢ per foot, $1 minimum. Showers, rest rooms available 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. in Snack Bar (small white building at end of pier where food is served from Nov. 15 to May 15), and ask for key at gas station. MECHANICS for gas engines from Wood's Chrysler or for diesel from Marine Engine Equipment Co. 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday to Saturday. Sundays and late hours see Caullett. Electrician and electronics from Sykes and Zweig across street from marina 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; nights and Sundays phone Sykes at home (7936). MARINE RAILWAY for boats up to 90 feet at Milling's Marineways in Riviera Beach (pronounced Ruh-veer-a) on waterway 3 miles from basin. Rybovich Boat Yard in West Palm Beach miles from basin takes powerboats up to 70 feet and is one of best men in Florida on repairs. GROCERIES (expensive) from Bustani's Supermarket or (less expensive) from Southampton Markets, and they both deliver. LAUNDRY and DRY CLEANING with a.m. to p.m. service from Gulfstream, Dixie or West Palm Beach Laundry. Patio RESTAURANT 2½ blocks west of marina is quick and good. Morrison's Imperial House in the Pennsylvania Hotel 3 blocks south is the place for a family dinner. For soft lights and French food Nino's Continental 2½ blocks east. BEST HOTELS are The Palm Beach Biltmore and The Breakers across the bridge in Palm Beach. Least expensive is Biltmore ($14 to $32 including breakfast). Breakers, closed until Dec. 15th opening of winter season, has not released new rate schedule. Dancing (young, jazz) at O'Hara's or the Montmartre in Palm Beach—Yellow Cab. Dancing at Monte Cristo Hotel or Casa Blanca. FISHING for blues, pompano, mackerel, snook off bridges or end of Palm Beach fishing pier. Charter boats for Gulf Stream fishing at marina or at Layton's Park in Riviera Beach 3 miles north. GOLF at Palm Beach Winter Club 7 miles north on U.S. 1, or West Palm Beach Country Club 3 miles south, or at Lake Worth Golf Club 7 miles away in Lake Worth. Yachtsmen welcome at all three. Good alternate tie-up in West Palm Beach is Palm Beach Yacht Club (public), on west bank of waterway at red nun 16 immediately north of Flagler Bridge. Room for 46 boats, with 8 feet of water on north side of pier, but only 4 feet in close on south side. Gas, diesel, water, power by meter with 25¢ minimum, ice on call 8 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Showers, rest rooms, small lounge with TV open till midnight. Club is 2 to 3 blocks farther from stores.

Waterway Terminus No. 1 is 35.5 miles south of West Palm Beach at Bahia Mar marina in Fort Lauderdale, where last year 850 people stopped short of Miami to spend winter aboard their boats. Basin is on east bank of waterway past black daymark 19, below Las Olas swing bridge. Bahia Mar holds 450 boats with 10 feet throughout the basin. Tide drops 2½ feet. Service station crew on hand 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. for gas, diesel. After hours see watchman at the tower. Ice available at dock. Water, shore power in all slips. Dockage May to Nov. $1 for boats up to 50 feet, $2 over 50. Dec. to April dockage from $1.50 to $7 per day depending on dock used. MECHANICS at dock 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. and after hours through watchman. Electricians and electronics on call during and after hours. Three MARINE ELEVATORS in basin handle boats up to 60 feet. Boats over 60 feet (and up to 125 feet) go to Broward Marine 4 miles up New River. GROCERIES from Bahia Mar Market (open 6 a.m. to 7 p.m.) and marina also has full stock of marine stores. LAUNDRY and DRY CLEANING picked up at the dock by Jack Haworth Laundry with same-day service. GOOD RESTAURANT at Marina open 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Private club (bar and dining room membership $100 per year with $200 initiation fee) is on second floor of same building and is the Place to Be for Bahia Mar regulars. Water taxis to town 35¢ for anyone who wants to go. Three boats leave marina twice daily for three-hour SIGHT-SEEING trips into Everglades. Excellent ocean beach is 200 yards from marina. Twenty-one charter boats for Gulf Stream FISHING (rates average $70 a day) at the basin. GOLF at Plantation Golf Course, 7 miles west of town, or at Fort Lauderdale Golf and Country Club, 5 miles away (both open to yachtsmen).

FOURTEENTH DAY
Leaving West Palm Beach for straight hop to Miami (no stopover at Fort Lauderdale) slow boats leave at 7 a.m. to make final run of 56.6 miles. BEST DOCK for visitors who want to spend nights aboard their boats (some Miami marinas do not allow this) is Dinner Key Yacht Basin five miles south of Rickenbacker Causeway. Basin holds 166 boats, but depth in basin and lead-in channel is only 5 feet (deeper boats—up to 9 feet—should go to City Yacht Basin). Tide drop is 3 feet. Dock crew on duty 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., after hours try guard or watchman on all night. Gas at Santana Marina 100 yards north, gas and diesel at Merrill-Stevens Boat Yard, 200 yards north. Dockage at Dinner Key is 5¢ a foot overnight, 4¢ a foot if you stay a month. Showers and rest room in main building. MECHANIC from Merrill-Stevens, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., and after hours through watchman at dock. Electricity and electronics at Merrill-Stevens, where MARINE RAILWAY handles boats up to 70 feet. GROCERIES from Village Market in Coconut Grove one mile from marina, or deliveries from Miami Grocery or Tip Top in Miami. LAUNDRY and DRY CLEANING picked up and delivered at dock. Miami is six miles from the marina by local bus (leaving every 20 minutes), or rent a car from Hertz or Ryder Service. RESTAURANTS and night clubs abound. For a starter, the Red Coach Grill, the Bahama and the Flame are all good steak houses. In Miami Beach, the Cathay House (Chinese) and the Embers (barbecue) are worth a try. The Vagabond NIGHT CLUB in Miami and the Beachcomber in Miami Beach usually have entertaining shows. However, practically all the big hotels in Miami Beach have passable shows at lower prices than night clubs. For HOTELS in Miami try the McAllister ($7 to $22) or Columbus ($6 to $23), or any of the hundreds of hotels at all rates in the area. For Gulf Stream FISHING there are 15 charter boats at Dinner Key ($50 a day for four), and there are 38 charter boats available at the famous Pier 5 at City Yacht Basin ($50 to $65 for 4 to 6 persons all day, $35 to $45 half day). For GOLF try the Biltmore course in Coral Gables or the Miami Springs, both public courses, or the Miami Shores, open to yachtsmen with club affiliations.

HIGH POINTS AND LOW MOMENTS

The Traveler who has sailed the waterway is likely to experience one of two sensations when he reaches his goal: relief at the trip being over, or regret. This is true of practically all boat trips, but the waterway, being somewhat longer than the average cruise, has a way of producing particularly intense feelings.

Take the first day. It is possible to get from Norfolk to Elizabeth City in seven smooth hours. It is also possible to take a lot longer, especially if you catch the keeper of the railroad drawbridge at the south end of the Norfolk Navy Yard on one of his bad days. He is one of the waterway's celebrated individualists. Therefore it is wise, after blowing for the bridge, to shift into neutral—if not reverse. After a considerable time the span may swing open. If it doesn't, resist the natural impulse to turn and wait out of the channel in the Navy berths on the starboard hand. The writer tried this a few weeks ago. In mid-maneuver there was a hoarse blast like one note on an old ah-ooo-ga Model T horn and a large life raft came hurtling off the end of an aircraft carrier and whammed into the water about 150 yards from the boat.

The carrier was testing its catapult. It worked fine.

Just below the Navy Yard is the Great Dismal Swamp, an extensive bog inhabited by deer, bear and catfish. It is not a good idea to run out of gas or break down in the Great Dismal Swamp. In the final 10 miles to the outskirts of Elizabeth City there are two houses, one at Possum Quarter Landing (no interest in passing boats) and one at Shipyard Landing (no shipyard). And the man who tows you into Elizabeth City—as the writer knows to his sorrow—charges $10 an hour, portal to portal.

Too many of these experiences can bend the spirit of even the most enthusiastic cruising man. It is, however, possible to sweep all the way to Miami without the smallest mishap—except the occasional running aground which is so standard on the waterway that it embarrasses no one.

You are likely to run into some characters—like the three ladies, none of whom had ever before owned a boat, who bought a cruiser and set out from Norfolk with no charts aboard but an automobile road map. Every time they came to a body of water they couldn't see across, they waited and followed the next boat that happened along. These tactics convulsed marina operators along the route. By all reports, however, the ladies reached Miami with no trouble beyond an occasional absent-minded running out of gas.

The marina operators also tell about the man in the converted landing craft who would get a local fisherman to tow him into mid-channel each morning, where he would flag a passing boat and get a tow as far down the line as possible while he sat in the stern of his barg watching television. He made it all the way to Morehead City before one of the tow boats found the barge's engine never did work and walked off with the TV set in payment for the tow.

Even without breakdowns and the characters, there is enough on the waterway to keep the yachtsman interested through a dozen trips. There is an extraordinary beauty to a Carolina salt marsh on a late fall afternoon, with the great barrier dunes in the background. And in the winding swamps below Bucksport the past of great plantations and pirate raiders hangs close to the live oaks and Spanish moss. In the towns, too, like Charleston and Savannah, there is a magnetic feeling of oldness. And during the last days of the trip there is, of course, Florida, where it might be possible for a yachtsman to become bored—but he would have to work at it very hard.

ILLUSTRATION5 ILLUSTRATION19 TWO ILLUSTRATIONS9 ILLUSTRATION7 ILLUSTRATION47 TWO ILLUSTRATIONS ILLUSTRATION12 ILLUSTRATION10 TWO ILLUSTRATIONS6 ILLUSTRATION8 ILLUSTRATION16 MAPNEW YORK
PHILADELPHIA
WILMINGTON
CHESAPEAKE CITY
BALTIMORE
ANNAPOLIS
WASHINGTON
SOLOMANS
CHESAPEAKE BAY
NORFOLK
DELAWARE BAY
MANASQUAN INLET AND BRIELLE
JERSEY WATERWAY FOR SHALLOW-DRAFT POWERBOATS ONLY
OUTSIDE ROUTE TO NORFOLK: SEAGOING POWERBOATS AND 30-FOOT-PLUS SAILBOATS ONLY
ATLANTIC OCEAN
MAP ILLUSTRATIONWATCH FOR THESE WARNINGS
STORM SIGNALS DISPLAYED AT GOVERNMENT STATIONS
SMALL CRAFT WARNING WIND APPROX. 25 MPH
ILLUSTRATION[See caption above.]
NORTHEAST STORM WIND APPROX. 32 TO 75
ILLUSTRATION[See caption above.]
SOUTHEAST STORM WIND APPROX. 32 TO 75
ILLUSTRATION[See caption above.]
SOUTHWEST STORM WIND APPROX. 32 TO 75
ILLUSTRATION[See caption above.]
NORTHWEST STORM WIND APPROX. 32 TO 75
ILLUSTRATION[See caption above.]
GALE OR HURRICANE WIND 75 MPH UP

WATERWAY TRAVELERS HAVE THESE THINGS ABOARD

FOR THE MEN

1 pair Topsiders
1 pair loafers
4 pair wool socks
2 pair nylon going-ashore socks
2 pair nylon undershorts
3 T shirts
2 pair flannel pajamas
1 pair Bermuda shorts (old)
1 pair dungarees
2 pair khakis (new enough to wash and wear ashore)
2 polo shirts
1 work shirt
2 going-ashore shirts
1 sports jacket
1 light sweater
1 heavy sweater
1 foul-weather suit
1 going-ashore raincoat optional: swim trunks

FOR THE LADIES

1 pair Topsiders
1 pair sensible shoes
1 pair heels
4 pair wool or nylon socks
2 pair Bermuda socks
1 pair dark Bermuda shorts
1 pair dark wool slacks, or
1 pair dungarees and long johns
1 pair short shorts
2 nylon blouses nylon underwear
2 flannel nightgowns or pajamas
1 light sweater
1 heavy sweater
1 slicker
1 street dress
1 good sweater and skirt
2 pair nylon stockings
1 light shore raincoat optional: swimsuit

FOR THE BOAT

1 good jackknife
1 small Danforth anchor with 5 feet light chain and 50 feet half-inch nylon line for kedging off mud banks, for stern anchoring and for heaving off stern to make quick stops at bridges.
extra docklines for springs and bridles
1 searchlight or flashlight with minimum beam of 150 yards
1 sounding pole (and line) with draft of boat marked in bright paint
2 extra fenders and 2 fender boards
U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey charts: No. 400 for Norfolk Harbor, Nos. 829-848 for waterway, No. 1,228 for Albemarle Sound
1 copy U.S. Coast Pilot, Atlantic Coast, Section D
1 pair strong binoculars (for buoy and bird watching)
optional: Texaco, Mobilgas or Esso cruise maps of Norfolk-Miami area

LOOK FOR YELLOW BANDS OR BORDERS ON ALL INLAND WATERWAY MARKERS

Port-Hand marks are black with odd numbers. Pointers indicate deep water inside the channel.

Black Dolphin includes a square daymark and a flashing light for nighttime navigation.

Black Cans are good tide indicators. They lean in the same direction current is flowing.

Black Ranges must be kept in perfect alignment, with circle directly on top of the diamond.

Black Daymarks are square—waterway symbol for marks that should be left to port.

Yellow Triangle on a black harbor buoy means waterway travelers leave buoy to starboard.

Starboard markers are painted red, carry even numbers. Pointers indicate navigable water.

Red Nuns are starboard counterparts of black cans, also make good tide direction-finders.

Red Ranges should be approached same as black—dead ahead and in perfect alignment.

Red Daymark is triangular—waterway symbol for markers to be left to the starboard hand.

Red Dolphins show red or white flashing or fixed light at night. Black shows green or white.

Yellow Square on red harbor nun means waterway travelers leave nun on their port hand.

THE INLAND WATERWAY

[MARINA]MARINA
[DANGER AREA]DANGER AREA
[RESTAURANT]RESTAURANT
[HOTEL]HOTEL

A traveler's guide to the various yacht basins, sports, sight-seeing, restuarants, hotels and minor hazards encountered along the 946.1 consecutive miles of sheltered waters between Norfolk, Va. and Miami, Fla.

FROM NORFOLK
WILLIAMSBURG, VA., 20 MILES BY FERRY AND ROAD FROM NORFOLK YACHT CLUB, WAS CAPITAL OF THE COLONY. CAPITOL BUILDING (RIGHT) IS PART OF IMPRESSIVE RESTORATION PROJECT IN WHICH COLONIAL TOWN WAS RECONSTRUCTED BY ROCKEFELLERS AND OPENED TO VISITORS

FROM NORFOLK, ELIZABETH CITY
WATERWAY PASSES WITHIN 15 MILES OF KITTY HAWK ON CAROLINA BANKS WHERE THE WRIGHT BROTHERS MADE THEIR FIRST FLIGHT IN 1903

FROM NORFOLK OR ELIZABETH CITY
DEER AND BEAR HUNTING IN THE GREAT DISMAL SWAMP ON THE VIRGINA-CAROLINA BORDER IS AMONG FINEST IN COUNTRY. BEST SHOOTING GROUND IS OWEND BY PRIVATE GUN CLUBS, BUT GUEST HUNTERS ARE OFTEN WELCOMED

FROM NORFOLK, ELIZABETH CITY
CAPE HATTERAS LIGHT, WITH DISTINCTIVE BARBERPOLE MARKINGS, IS ONE OF THE TALLEST BRICK STRUCTURS IN WORLD, MARKS DANGEROUS DIAMOND SHOAL-CALLED GRAVEYARD OF ATLANTIC BY MARINERS

FROM BELHAVEN
CANADA GOOSE SHOOTING ON MATAMUSKEET LAKE NEAR RIVER FOREST MANOR IS THE BEST IN THE YEARS. ALSO GOOD GOOSE SHOOTING IN CURRITUCK AND PAMLICO SOUNDS

FROM MORELAND CITY
TRYON PALACE, BUILD DURING 1760'S FOR ROYAL GOVERNOR, IS 37 MILES FROM YATCH BASIN, DESTROYED BY FIRE 157 YEARS AGO PALACE IS NOW BEING RESTROED BY STATE

FROM MOREHEAD, WRIGHTSVILLE
YACHTSMEN WHO LAY OVER FOR A DAY CAN SURF FISH FOR STRIPER OFF BEACHES OR HIRE GUIDES TO TAKE THEM TO OUTER BANKS

FROM WRIGHTSVILLE BEACH
CAPE FEAR COUNTRY CLUB, 7 MILES BY ROAD FROM BOAT BASIN, OFFERS YACHTSMEN GOLF OVER SAME CHAMPIONSHIP COURSE ON WHICH PGA HOLDS ANNUAL AZALEA OPEN

FROM BUCKSPORT
ON ROUTE BETWEEN BUCKSPORT AND CHARLESTON, CHANNEL PASSES THROUGH CAPE ROMAIN BIRD SANCTUARY, BIGGEST PRESERVE ON THE ATLANTIC COAST. THIS IS BIRDWATCHERS' PARADISE—EGRETS, HERONS, CURLEWS, GREBE

FROM NORTH CAROLINA MARINAS
FISHING IN GULF STREAM, WHICH SWINGS TO WITHIN 10 TO 20 MILES OF SHORE FROM WRIGHTSVILLE TO HATTERAS. CHARTER BOATS ALONG COAST GO OUT FOR MARLIN. BARRACUDA, OTHER GAME FISH

FROM CHARLESTON
FORT SUMTER IS ONE OF PRIME TOURIST ATTRACTIONS IN TOWN THAT OFFERS PERHAPS BEST ANTE-BELLUM—AND BELLUM—SIGHT-SEEING ALONG WATERWAY. EXCURSION BOAT CONDUCTS DAILY TOUR AT 2:30 P.M. TO THE FORT.

FROM ISLE OF HOPE
ANTIQUE HUNTING IS A TOP SPORT IN SAVANNAH, 8 MILES FROM THE ISLE OF HOPE. GOOD HUNTING GROUNDS; THE ROSEMARY SHOP, SMITH ANTIQUES, GOODMAN'S ANTIQUE SHOP

FROM ST. SIMON'S MILLS
THE CLOISTERS HOTEL ON SEA ISLAND IS THE FOCAL POINT FOR ONE OF THE MOST PLUSH RESORTS ON THE COAST—BEACH, GOLF, HORSES, DANCING, ETC.

BEAUFORT TO ST. SIMON'S MILLS
CAROLINA-GEORGIA COAST IS GAME BIRD TERRITORY. TURKEYS SCARCE BUT SOME SHOOTING ON HILTON HEAD ISLAND-QUAIL AND DOVE GROUNDS WEST OF ISLE OF HOPE AND ST. SIMON'S MILLS RAIL AND COOT IN SALT MARSHES

FROM DAYTONA BEACH
THIS IS ABSOLUTE NORTHERN LIMIT OF SENSIBLE BEACH ACTIVITY DURING LATE FALL AND EARLY SPRING. ALSO AT BEACH, MEMORIALS TO AUTO RACING. NASCAR SPEED WEEK FEBRUARY 12 TO 20, INCLUDING ROAD RACES FOR SPORTS AND STOCK CARS AND ONE-MILE SPEED TRIALS

IN MARINELAND
MARINELAND AQUARIUM HAS OWN DOCKS. BIG ATTRACTION IS FEEDING HOUR (11 A.M., 2 AND 4 P.M.) WHEN PORPOISES JUMP FROM WATER TO TAKE FISH FROM KEEPER'S HAND

FROM FORT PIERCE
BRIGHTON SEMINOLE INDIAN RESERVATION IS 57 MILES FROM FORT FIERCE ON NORTHWEST SIDE OF LAKE OKEECHOBEE. SEMINOLES DO BOOMING BUSINESS WITH TOURISTS IN INDIAN HANDIWORK

FROM MIAMI
WINTER RACING SEASON IN MIAMI OPENS AT TROPICAL ON NOVEMBER 28. HIALEAH, ONE OF LEADING TRACKS IN NATION, HOLDS TOP STAKES OF WINTER—WIDENER HANDICAP (FEBRUARY 18) AND FLAMINGO STAKES (FEBRUARY 25). SEASON ENDS AT GULFSTREAM APRIL 21

FROM FLORIDA MARINAS
BIG-GAME FISHING FOR BLUE AND WHITE MARLIN, SAILFISH, DOLPHIN, BARRACUDA IS YEAR-ROUND SPORT IN FLORIDA. FORT PIERCE CLAIMS BIGGEST PER CAPITA CATCH; BUT FISHING IS EXCELLENT BY CHARTER BOAT FROM MIAMI, FORT LAUDERDALE AND DOZENS OF OTHER PORTS ALONG THE ROUTE

START: Norfolk Yacht and Country Club, Norfolk, Va.

[MARINA] 1ST DAY: Elizabeth City Shipyard, Elizabeth City, N.C.—44.3 miles from Norfolka
[DANGER AREA] Lookout for hidden snags in Dismal Swamp Canal
[RESTAURANT] The Circle
[DANGER AREA] Watch for sudden squarlls crossing Albemarle Sound

[MARINA] 2ND DAY: River Forest Manor, Belhaven, N.C.—119.8 milesa
[DANGER AREA] Neuse River dangerous during heavy winstorms.

[MARINA] 3RD DAY: Morehead City Yacht Basin, Morehead City, N.C.—178.4 milesa
[RESTAURANT] Capt. Bill's Waterfront Restaurant and Tony's Sanitary Fish Market
[RESTAURANT] Marina Restaurant

[MARINA] 4TH DAY: Wrightsville Marina, Wrightsville Beach, N.C.—245.8 milesa
[DANGER AREA] Caution: side currents at ocean inlets may throw boats off course
[HOTEL] Dunes Village

[MARINA] 5TH DAY: Bucksport Marina, Bucksport, S.C.—327.4 milesa
[RESTAURANT] Perditas
[HOTEL] Ft. Sumter Hotel and Francis Marion Hotel

[MARINA] 6TH DAY: Charleston Municipal Yacht Basin, Charleston, S.C.—406 miles
[DANGER AREA] Four slow drawbridges on route to Beaufort

[MARINA] 7TH DAY: Beaufort Municipal and Gulf Dock, Beaufort S.C.—465.5 miles
[HOTEL] General Oglethorpe Hotel

[MARINA] 8TH DAY: Brady's Boat Works, Isle of Hope, Ga.—511.9 miles
[RESTAURANT] Pirate's House

[MARINA] 9TH DAY: Olsen's Yacht Yard, Simon's Mills, Ga.—586.4 miles
[DANGER AREA] Six-knot current through Atlantic Boulevard drawbridge

[MARINA] 10TH DAY: El Vorde Yacht Basin and Club, Jacksonville Beach, Fla.—649.3 miles
[MARINA] City Yacht Pier, St. Augustine, Fla.—675.4 miles*
[MARINA] Marineland Docks at Marineland, Fla.—691.4 miles*
[HOTEL] Daytona Plaza

[MARINA] 11TH DAY: Daytona, Beach Boat Works, Daytona Beach, Fla.—721 miles

[MARINA] 12TH DAY: Eau Gallie Yacht Basin, Eau Gallie, Fla.—749.5 miles
[MARINA] Ft. Pierce Yacht Basin, Ft. Pierce, Fla.—839.3 miles*

[MARINA] 13TH DAY: West Palm Beach Marina, West Palm Beach, Fla.—889.5 miles
[HOTEL] The Breakers and The Biltmore
[MARINA] Bahia Mar Marina, Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.—924 mites*
[RESTAURANT] Red Coach Grill
[HOTEL] Columbus and McAllister hotels

[MARINA] 14TH DAY: Dinner Key Marina, Miami, Fla.—946.1 miles

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)