Search

For all over-80 golfers

Dec. 05, 1955
Dec. 05, 1955

Table of Contents
Dec. 5, 1955

Events & Discoveries
Spectacle
  • The match race between Swaps and Nashua provided the biggest racing moment of 1955 and determined the year's top Thoroughbred

Horses
The Army Arrived By Land
The Wonderful World Of Sport
Boxing
  • BOXING 44

    SCORING A BOXING MATCH ADDS TO THE FUN AND CAN BE DONE, EVEN IN FRONT OF A TELEVISION SCREEN, IF YOU KNOW THE RULES

Fencing
  • FENCING 47

    AMERICA'S DIM HOPES FOR ITS FIRST OLYMPIC FENCING TITLE ARE BRIGHTENED CONSIDERABLY BY TWO DETERMINED NEW BLADES

Fisherman's Calendar
Sport In Art
Acknowledgments
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over
Pat On The Back

For all over-80 golfers

If I were to select one idea or thought for golfers of all playing abilities except perhaps the good golfer, it would be this: Develop an easy, relaxed manner of taking your grip, walking up to the ball, soling the club, moving into the waggle and the forward press, and then and only then, swinging the club. Every good player has a distinct rhythmic movement in the address and waggle before he starts his swing. It is so well coordinated and blends into his backswing so easily that it is not noticeable, or seems not to be, to the average player watching. It has become part of his swing from imitating good players as a youngster or simply from trying to feel a coordinated movement before starting the swing. Many good players have worked hours at a time changing their preliminary movements to achieve a more coordinated swing. If these preliminary movements are so necessary in a good player's swing, then they certainly should be helpful in improving the swing of an average player.

This is an article from the Dec. 5, 1955 issue Original Layout

Remember: The beginning movements of your swing start the moment you first sole your club to the ball. From that moment on, there should be no point at which you come to a complete stop before you start a swing from the ball. You cannot develop a powerful, smooth, rhythmical swing from a still position. You have to be in motion, and you have to keep yourself in motion until you move into your backswing.

from CHARLES (CHUCK) CONGDON, Tacoma Country and Golf Club, Tacoma, Wash.

TWO PHOTOSFOUR ILLUSTRATIONSChuck Congdon moves into his swing

NEXT WEEK'S GUEST: JOE BELFORE ON THE SHORT PITCH