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THE WRAGGE LOOK

Jan. 09, 1956
Jan. 09, 1956

Table of Contents
Jan. 9, 1956

Events & Discoveries
Spectacle
The Bowl Games
The Wonderful World Of Sport
Conversation Piece:
Sport In Art
Fisherman's Calendar
Basketball
Part I: Bob Cousy
Sporting Look
Snow Patrol
Ski Tip
  • SKI TIP 59
    By Friedl Pfeifer/Coach, U.S. Olympic Team

    SKIS CHATTERING IN A TURN CAN LOSE YOU PRECIOUS SECONDS OR EVEN CONTROL. HERE IS SOME ADVICE, FOR NOVICES AND RACERS

Acknowledgments
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over
Pat On The Back

THE WRAGGE LOOK

The American most responsible for the classic spectator look of American women at the world's resorts, Sydney Wragge, spends almost as much time on the golf courses and sailing the waters of the Long Island Sound and off Boca Raton as he does on New York's Seventh Avenue. His two favorite sports are reflected in his clothes, in middy blouses, golf-ball-print polka dots. The Wragge look, synonymous with elegant silks and linens, restrained color and custom detail, grew out of Sydney Wragge's men's shirt designs. Women bought the shirts, demanded skirts to match. His 1956 collection of resort clothes, photographed at Boca Raton near his winter home, is shown on this and the following three pages.

This is an article from the Jan. 9, 1956 issue Original Layout

Two colors and textures are typical of Wragge clothes. Neville Gezelschap wears silk-and-linen shorts and middy ($35), carries matching sun umbrella at the beach.

YACHTING COLORS—red, white, blue—fly in most Wragge resort collections. Aboard the Jessica S at the Australian Pier, Palm Beach, Barbara Freeland wears a white linen dress ($45); Mrs. Gezelschap a pleated silk skirt ($35), cummerbund ($6.95) and blouse ($23.95); Chris Ledridge a red linen sheath ($39.95) and white linen officer's jacket ($45). The clothes pictured above and elsewhere on these four pages are available at the following fine stores: Burdine's, Miami; Bonwit Teller, New York; Julius Garfinckel Co., Washington; Harold's, Minneapolis; I. Magnin & Co., San Francisco; Neiman-Marcus, Dallas; Rich's, Atlanta; Scruggs-Vandervoort-Barney, Inc., St. Louis.

Oriental influence is introduced to the American casual treatment in a golden silk overdress, called "Tea-timer" ($55 with white linen skirt). As a hostess, Mrs. Freeland here wears it with white linen slacks ($19.95).

Modern art influences many Wragge designs. Here he creates a pastel pattern by contrasting colors and fabrics. Ruth Flynn wears the pink-and-white silk-and-linen coat ($75) in the Cloisters Patio of the Boca Raton Club.

Scarf Necklines, always different, are another Wragge signature. This beige raw silk scarf, worn by Peggy Brannen in Boca Raton, buttons at the neckline of a white linen dress ($39.95).

Demishirt, cropped halfway up the back, is an innovation of the 1956 Wragge collection. A red Oriental-print shirt ($14.95) is paired with beige wool jersey bloomers ($17.95) by Mrs. Ladridge.

PHOTOJERRY COOKEDESIGNER SYDNEY WRAGGESIX PHOTOSJERRY COOKE