The Question: Which sells more newspapers, the front page or the sports page? (Asked at the AP Managing Editors' Convention, Broadmoor Hotel, Colorado Springs)

February 13, 1956

ROBERT G. SHAND
Managing editor
New York News
"I assume you mean men readers. The first question is: What's on page one? It's page one that the reader sees on the newsstand, so that's what gets first crack at his attention. I'll go along with surveys of men readers that show 95% preferring page one, 90%, for sports."

HARVEY W. PATTON
Managing editor
Detroit News
"We couldn't get out a good paper without the sports page. Sports are just as much news as anything else that gets into a newspaper and they have as strong an appeal as the headline news. We often run a good sports story on the front page and allow it to compete with the headline news of that day."

N. DWIGHT ALLISON
Managing editor
San Antonio Light
"The sports page. What have we got without horse racing throughout the year, and football in season? Nothing. Sure, some people are interested in general news, but they'll glance at the front page and turn to the sports pages. You can broadcast news, but you can't broadcast a racing chart."

J. EDWARD MURRAY
Managing editor
Los Angeles Mirror-News
"Sports pages have more popular appeal, certainly, among men, and women readership of sports is improving. Sports pages sell more newspapers to the average man except when front page news is hot. I'd compare the front page to the heart and the sports pages to the lungs."

GEORGE BEEBE
Managing editor
Miami (Fla.) Herald
"The front page is the show window, but in sports-minded Miami, our sports section is just about our best selling feature. That's why we never hesitate to give page-one play to top sports events. With TV bringing sports to a new audience, we expect sports pages to become even more important."

MICHAEL J. OGDEN
Managing editor
Providence (R.I.)
Journal and Bulletin
"The front page. If a newspaperman had to make a choice, he'd take the front page first, then sports. The front page has the basic ingredients, the reason for publishing a newspaper. In the long run, we wouldn't sell more newspapers with sports on the front page."

PALMER HOYT
Publisher and editor
Denver Post
"It's hard to say. We run more sports news than most papers and thus consider sports to be more important. In my recent travels through the country, I've seen newspapers that could improve their circulation through sports. Sports are as much a part of our life as politics and business."

RALPH C. TAYLOR
News editor
Pueblo (Col.) Star-Journal
"I attended the American Press Institute Managing Editors' Seminar at Columbia University, where this question came up. I'm convinced that we must do more with sports, not just more sports, but the background and glamour of sports, as SI has done. Why should we let you fellows take the cream?"

DAN ALBRECHT
Managing editor
Herald-Sews
Joliet, Ill.
"On the day-to-day operation, especially in larger cities, the front page sells more. But over the long pull, a good sports section will do more to build circulation than any other part of the paper. Some of the most vivid writing to be found anywhere is being done by today's sportswriters."

PAUL S. SWENSSON
Managing editor
Minneapolis Tribune
"The sports page does not sell more newspapers than page one. Nor will it until the sports pages attract women readers in large numbers. Some sports promotions have succeeded in attracting women fans. Very few sports pages have acquired the technique of attracting them."

ALAN HATHWAY
Managing editor
Newsday
Garden City, N.Y.
"It's a mistake to relegate top sports to the back pages. They're news. The sport fan's ability to recall a spectacular play on TV is insufficient to satisfy his needs. The viewing of a top play stimulates his desire to see the photographs and to read the description in a newspaper or magazine."

ELEVEN PHOTOS ILLUSTRATION

NEXT WEEK:

What sport not now included do you think most deserves to be added to the Olympic Games?

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)